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An employer in germany can give gifts to their employees. The baseline is that any substantial gift is treated like wage or otherwise subject to taxes. There are tons of rules about the details (in particular about gifts for occasions like anniversaries, birth day, birth of a child, Christmas, ...) but the following points are relevant here: Monetary gifts ...


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The short answer is that France not only gets to decide how donations are taxed, but what a donation (for tax purposes) is in the first place. It doesn't matter if the company calls it a donation, because it isn't.


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First, on a purely technical level, what's usually called a “donation” in French law is unilateral so it wouldn't be very appealing to an employer. Usually it's used for real estate as if you are just giving cash (don manuel), you don't need to involve a notary or draw up any specific act. In fact, what the donation achieves is documenting the change of ...


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I think you mean a "gift". Clearly pay for work is not a gift. It's a payment for consideration (consideration means your work). Gifts don't have consideration. Passing it off as such is fraud. It's also the case that the rules for companies gifting their employees are different than the ones for individuals gifting individuals. But you're not describing ...


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The distribution schedule of ETFs depends on the stocks themselves. For example, if most of the S&P 500 constituents are on quarterly schedule, then the S&P 500 ETFs would be on quarterly schedule. If real estate rent is monthly, then the real estate ETF would be monthly. It would be sub-optimal if your selections are limited to a certain type of ...


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