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Both dividends and capital gains are referred to as distributions in that context. https://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/distribution.asp: A distribution generally refers to the disbursement of assets from a fund, account, or individual security to an investor. Mutual fund distributions consist of net capital gains made from the profitable sale of portfolio ...


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These are not industry conventions. NRA W/H means Non-Resident Alien Withholding Tax. REV could mean anything e.g. Revenue, Reversed, Revised. Ask the broker who designed this description.


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A stock that currently doesn't pay dividend can be worth a lot of money, because the stock will eventually pay dividend. An example: Let's consider you own a stock with market value that represents 0.01% of the total world economy. The total world economy grows 5% nominally. Average stocks pay 3% dividend. However, this particular stock grows 8% nominally ...


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Yikes. I highly suspect your corp has under-reported income in the past, if you are claiming personal vehicle costs without corresponding business income. Seek paid advice from a tax expert about filing a "voluntary disclosure" to make things right before you do anything else. Dividends can be paid out of passive income, but it seems quite possible ...


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I'm not saying that this doesn't exist but in 20+ years of investing in and trading preferred stocks, as well as buying IPOs of preferred stocks, I have never seen this. OTOH, I have seen and traded many equity IPOs that had one or more warrants attached. Until the warrant(s) becomes detachable, you can only trade the unit as a whole. Once the warrants ...


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The source you cited is likely wrong. Preferred stock would have custom, ad hoc terms regardless. A company could definitely sell preferred stocks with detachable warrants that still gets dividends. Maybe the author of that article is implying it's standard practice to do such a thing, but I don't think so. The value of the preferred stock would be little ...


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It makes no sense to invest in a stock solely because it pays a dividend. Dividends do not provide total return. Only share price appreciation does so. Though taxed as income, dividends are not income. You should be investing in high quality companies that are leaders in their sector with strong, growing free cash flow, low debt, and good management. If ...


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It's not crazy to invest in the US - any non-US investors buying a 'global' fund are paying a withholding tax on US dividends within that fund. This article discusses reducing the tax to 15% by personally claiming your country's tax treaty or by investing in an ETF that can claim a tax treaty. For individual high-yield stocks, if you believe the US stocks ...


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KWEB declared a special dividend of $2.58 on 12/29/21. A special dividend is one that is not regularly scheduled so therefore you cannot screen or search for it. At best, if a company has a pattern of declaring special dividends, you might be able to anticipate the date but definitely not the amount. And while you did not ask this, there is no benefit to ...


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