New answers tagged

41

This is extremely serious and needs to be stopped instantly - today. I can only see two routes, Immediately phone someone like an Aunt or Uncle, if there is such a person, and tell them everything. Walk to the police station and tell them everything. Your Mom is going to be pissed at you for awhile. You're just going to have to accept that. Do 1 or 2 as ...


-5

Uhmmm... what if your mum is the scammer? The evil one? Let's try a different interpretation. I won't focus on the African friend part, but on this I heard her talking about paying for this "signature" and to send the money over so that some people could forge this signature so that he could then send some money over To me, this sounds like a ...


85

Yes there are many scams like what you describe. Criminals like money, and as one movie villain said "the best kind of money is .... other people's money!" Popular game and music codes are easy to convert back to money. It is easy for the scammer to resell these locally. It is difficult to tell what the scam is from your description, but fake ...


2

You say “a friend”. Is it someone who you have known for many years? Who you meet for a beer or two once or twice a week? If not, it’s a scam. Your so-called friend will take $32,500 off you and you will never hear from them again. If yes, your friend has been falling for a scam himself. Tell him that you are not sending any money anywhere, and if he sends ...


5

Think of below questions: Why don't your friend open a bank account himself and get the money himself. Why is he using your account for routing the money ? This seems too suspicious. Why your friend is giving you 35% of share, just for sharing your bank account details? This seems too suspicious. Banks are asked to report cash transfers > $10000, as ...


11

If it's not money laundering, here's what will happen: You receive $50,000 in your account. You give your "friend" $32,500. The deposit gets reversed. Your $17,500 disappears, and you are on the hook for the remaining $32,500. You will be unable to contact your "friend" again. Even the setup is fishy. The highest price for Bitcoin in ...


3

Payment must be irreversible A fundamental part of most scams is that payment methods must be irreversible. It must be impossible for the "mark" to clawback the money once the jig is up. Suppose the scammer took the money via a credit card. They would have to establish a relationship with a card processor, and prove to the processor their ...


1

Western Union is a way to send money to someone who doesn't have a bank account, or doesn't have access to their bank account. (Say, far from home.) Scammers like it because with a fake ID it leaves no useful records of who got the money and thus it makes it much harder to catch them.


1

From Wikipedia's piece on the Madoff scandal: Madoff was a "master marketer" who, throughout the 1970s and 1980s, built a reputation as a wealth manager for a highly exclusive clientele. Investors who gained access, typically on word-of-mouth referral, believed that they had entered the inner circle of a money-making genius, and some were wary of ...


14

For clarity, in case this helps someone: It's an extremely well-known, very popular, scam (in India and elsewhere). It's totally common to get 3 or 4 calls with this particular scam each month. Completely ignore it.


17

If you mean "recharge" as in add more money to your phone payment account, then this is 100% a scam. For the following reasons: The phone provider will most likely not call you asking for personal details to apply a payment. Even if they did call to tell you a payment is due, it would either be an automated message that says "your payment is ...


19

Yeah, you do have a self-help option... SUE THEM! It elegantly solves all the problems Because of the fraud, they're into you for at least triple damages, and possibly a lot more if their behavior would enrage a jury. Suing someone is a "self-help" legal solution that allows you to forbid, compel, or take money damages. You can't send them to ...


16

Never, ever, take the law into your own hands: the state doesn't like competition, and assuming that you're a law-abiding citizen who hasn't obscured his identity you're an easy target. As others have said, report it to the police... I assume your (or your daughter's) bank is already aware. If you don't get satisfaction that way, then use the services of ...


17

Assuming that these guys are scammers, you have no idea how professional these people are. They could be part of a gang, they could be part of a mafia group, they could be terrorists, you don't know exactly who these scammers are. The best thing to do is to clear your head and tell the authorities what you have found. In the first place, you should have ...


43

As others have mentioned: You could attack an innocent person. You will face legal ramifications if you do attack whoever it might be — their wrongdoing doesn't exempt you from facing consequences. Let the criminal justice system deal with the scammers. AND equally as important: you yourself might come to bodily harm — if they are scammers I'm sure they ...


273

There is a real chance that you haven't found the scammer. You may have just found another victim. The risk to you is that you decide to try and scam the scammer, or you try to physically strike the scammer, and then you find out you were wrong. The police will then become very interested in you. If you haven't contacted the police and/or your bank do so now....


0

If it's in the United States tell him to mail you the application then it's a fraud if they FedEx it to you or UPS it it's not. And I would never give that information out to anybody but the landlord and you can check with the county see who owns it if it's ever in question


24

I've personally encountered a scam with these kind of features, twice. Both times it happened to a friend - one was a tenant applicant and the other was a landlord. The scammer rents a property for a week or two e.g. on AirBnB. They advertise the property as a long-term rental, claiming to be the landlord or representing the landlord. They take as many ...


0

You lost $650 to scammers. It is your choice whether you want to increase your loss to $1850 or not. Your $6,000 gains do not exist, and you will never get them. If it wasn’t a scam, and there was $6,000 that you earned, and for some unimaginable reason there was a $1200 fee, any honest place would just send you $4,800. PS. You got $650 worth of education ...


34

You're right, at best this is very strange and at worst they are trying to scam or steal from you. I can not think of a single reason why a landlord would tell the current renters to collect applications and fees from potential tenants. Sometimes a landlord will waive any lease-breaking fees if the current tenant finds someone to replace them immediately ...


0

You didn’t take many circumstances like inflation, the price for used items (even if you haven't manipulated with them anyhow, the second-hand status lowers the cost), and the market’s feature. Moreover, I agree with other commentators. You pay more than 1000 in truth, and no one will give you the same sum.


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