New answers tagged

28

The first six digits of a Visa or MasterCard card comprise the Bank Identification Number (BIN) and card type (Visa, M/C, etc), which identifies the issuer, the next 9 digits (when a Visa or M/C) are the issuer-assigned account number unique to the card, and the last digit is a checksum. Having the BIN makes it simple to know if the issuer is one that ...


2

It’s all just a scam. The last thing a scammer wants to do is actually get law enforcement involved, so in answer to your question of “what should I do” - delete, block, move on. And don’t enter into these kinds of arrangements in future with someone you haven’t met in person.


2

This smells like money laundering. That is usually the case when someone gave you money and now they want you to send the money to someone else. Was that what happened? If it's dirty money, you'd get in trouble for it.


2

It's a classic scam with extra "theater" added on Their ultimate goal is to either swindle you out of money, or use you as a "money mule" to launder money they have obtained via other means, like hacking other people's bank accounts. Typically they will ask you to forward money to them through an irreversible means, after they send money ...


1

While there are good answers, I feel one aspekt is missing: Regularly (at least once in eight weeks, doublecheck your local/bank rules) check your bank account for any irregular withdrawels. As the setting you described screams "illegal activity", they could try to fake a sepa direct debit mandate to get your money. When you notice anything like ...


4

I recall being involved in a nonprofit organization where someone had used a personal PayPal account to collect conference registration feeds and then forwarded it to the organization; it ended up being a major finding the next time there was an internal audit (which lead to a very tense meeting about the organization's finances). Point being, it is not ...


0

I'm sorry to hear that someone took (or tried to take) advantage of your willingness to trust, but that's how scam artists like this work. Your post doesn't say exactly WHAT "supplies" you were supposed to buy to do the job, but whatever they were doesn't change the fact this was simply a way to con money out of someone. And unfortunately they are ...


6

when I first gave them the IBAN for the bank account they said they were not collaborating with that (admittedly minor) bank and asked me to open an account with another bank from a list (all of them reputable and well known banks.) IBAN is a universal payment method, and is standard for all companies hiring employees. Different payment methods may apply ...


29

This is definitely a scam, and it's a variation of the 'money mule scam' scam, where they send you a check, asking you to deposit it and then send a portion back to them or on to one or more others. You could VERY easily find yourself in deep legal hot water if what you're being asked to do is interpreted as money laundering, and almost certainly that's what ...


72

Never transfer money 'on behalf of' someone else. Never personally register for something that requires you to perform cash transactions in your own name, on behalf of your company. [I've edited to remove a suggestion that you try and get paid - you've been there a day, better to just call this a loss and move on] Changing payment terms like this is common ...


0

I've been thinking of asking him the next time we meet in person to give me some sort of ID or proof that he really does own that property, though I'm sure that would seem like a weird thing for a potential tenant to ask. Of course. That must be the normal way of renting a property. Both parties exchange their IDs, check for counterfeition, acquire photo-...


2

Hmm, I can think of legitimate reasons for all of this. Meet at a public place: Maybe he's just being cautious. If he's living in this house and is renting out a room, maybe he doesn't want to give out his address to any random person who contacts him. He figures he wants to at least meet the person first. Generic application downloaded from Internet: I don'...


4

If you have to ask if it's a scam, the answer is already obvious. That's the way I generally answer these. Yes, they haven't asked for money yet, but they will. They have to lay the foundations and warm up the orchestra first before the violins start playing. These things start with seeing if a) you're willing to answer, b) are you willing to keep ...


1

YOU NEED TO CONTACT A LAWYER IMMEDIATELY!!! They will recommend whether or not you should contact the police, and (if not) will advise you if (when?) the police come looking for you. All the other answers explain possible details of the scam, but none of them spell this conclusion out explicitly! You have almost certainly logged into an account and ...


14

Yet another possibility is something along the lines of: they ask you to perform an operation they have the website display the outcome of a different operation instead they claim you screwed something up and sent more money than you were asked to they demand you compensate them A recent video by Mark Rober showcases a real-life scam, primarily targeting ...


11

Since the bank account is fake, it's practice. The scammer is actually cultivating you. It's a confidence game, but in a form called "the long con". For scammers, the limiting factor (the scarce resource) is the human resource: the scammer's own time. They can't afford to waste their own time working with skeptical "marks" who will ...


24

This sounds like the definition of a "confidence scheme", in which the scammer does things which at the beginning seem legitimate or, even if suspicious, work out exactly as they promise they will. Naturally it starts with small amounts as 1) a way to lure you in ("it's only a few bucks, what's the harm in that?" you might think), and 2) ...


52

The scammer gave you login credentials to account X and had you move money to account Y. The scammer didn't own account X. What is likely is that the person who owns account Y was told "I" will transfer $5,000 to your account, you keep $500 and send the rest as a money order to this address. The reason why account Y now appears invalid is that the ...


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