New answers tagged

5

Anyone can print this stuff and make it look official. Have you met your boyfriend in person, or only online? I'm afraid if you haven't met him in person this is very likely to be the beginnings of a scam and you would be safest to cut off contact and move on. I'm sorry.


6

Cancel the sale. Report the buyer. Most likely, this is a legit eBay account that has been hacked. Telling eBay will help the owner get it back. The purpose of saying "Africa" was to self-declare as a scammer. Scammers do this for good reason. Any genuine buyer in Africa would know (by now) how to buy on American eBay properly. For instance they would ...


63

With eBay, what's important to always keep front and center is how to protect yourself via eBay's policies, because diverging from them can easily result in all monetary burdens resting on you, possibly along with account penalties being incurred. I'll explain, but to start, in answer to "how to deal with" this situation: In Short, How to Proceed Reply to ...


3

Its a SCAM! Happened to me. They copy the PayPal page. When you click the link to check the payment the sites states that the funds are being held. Paypal doesn't hold money. Payments are transferred between parties instantly and if there isms problem then you file a dispute. Whenever anything seems a little off check the url. They will trick you with ...


33

I think JTP's answer is a good one, you will want to cancel this order. Their reasoning is maybe a little more zealous than I would handle it, but in this case, I agree with your assessment - this is almost certainly a scam. But it seems your real question is: How do I cancel this transaction. Here is a link to an eBay site explaining how to cancel it. ...


77

I've sold a limited number of times on eBay (not for profit, just cleaning out basement). Any time a buyer offers anything that's not 100% 'normal', i.e. needing anything at all outside the terms of normal sale, I cancel the transaction. Maybe you'll lose the honest buyer who genuinely had some issue. It's a big world, and they'll find their item elsewhere, ...


10

It is a scam, plain and simple. throw the check away and discontinue contact with the person who sent it. I know it is tempting to think there is a small chance it is real, but it isn't. It fails the smell test of why a stranger would mail you that much money for no reason and no strings attached.


2

The most important thing first: Don't send this person any money! Also important: Any legal threats are empty. If he was stupid enough to complain to the FBI, he'd be the first to be arrested, so that's not going to happen. And expect the money from the checque to evaporate.


7

What the scammer is really trying to do is get you to send $1500 through Zelle! After you do that, the $2000 payment will evaporate. The cashier's check will bounce, the EFT will be reversed as fraud, whatever the case may be. And then you will owe the bank $2000. Everything out of the scammer's mouth is a lie, for that single purpose. The scammer ...


21

Take a look at some of the other questions in the sugar-daddy tag. Your experience is not unique, sadly. The tag description shows what I think is happening to you: A sugar relationship is often used as a setup for more ordinary fraud by enticing the sugar-baby as a mark. The scammer suggests to the sugar-baby that he likes her and would like to send her ...


8

And now she's saying she also wants me to [...] be her "account manager". [...] she's already told me she wants to keep money in my bank account. You are being recruited as a money mule. The criminal will send you money from hacked bank accounts to your personal account and then ask you to forward that money. Often in form of hard to trace methods like ...


14

Likely mode of the scam: You'll funnel some/all of the transactions through your own bank account and then the money he sent to you to fund the transactions will bounce or disappear. He's already laying the groundwork by telling you he has many transactions, frequently out of town, etc. In 3 weeks, he will have an "important opportunity out of the country" ...


5

Protection of their identity is definitely the reason for doing it. That way when the police start investigating a bank account that is being used for money laundering or fraud, it will be your name that is on the bank account, and not theirs.


11

“Remote” job position plus “bitcoin” = scam. I’m sorry - your best bet at this point is to block them, delete any messages and move on. If you have already given them any of your personal information then you may need to watch your credit report, and definitely change any passwords if you have given those out.


6

Question is - can I get money back? Most likely not (see the more extensive answer from Nosjack) Two important warnings: 1. If you have been scammed successfully, the scammer(s) will (most likely) try to scam you again! They have your phone number/email (and maybe other personal information) so it is quite likely the will try to scam you again in a ...


38

Sorry to say, your money is most likely gone for good. You bought the gift cards from the store yourself, in some cases intentionally bypassing the procedures put up by the store to prevent gift card fraud. You mention "red flags" that the merchant and credit card should have seen, but you failed to see them yourself. You could argue that the merchant is ...


12

Unfortunately, you fell for the scam, bought gift cards and (presumably) gave them away, so most likely neither the merchant or credit card company are obligated to help. Merchants are trained to help stop scams, but they can't be experts at fraud prevention and they can't be held liable if all they did was sell you the gift cards you wanted. People ...


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