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9

Health Insurance/Private Medical Insurance in the UK is a luxury not a requirement The NHS in the UK is funded through National Insurance and general taxation that is taken from pay at source (generally), the amount of which varies by earnings of the individual. Access to NHS services is based on residency (if you live outside the UK but use NHS services ...


2

I searched for “Cavendish Online FSCS” and found a page of Ts and Cs https://www.cavendishonline.co.uk/faqs/what-happens-if-cavendish-online-or-fundsnetwork-go-out-of-business This pointed me at a different page hosted on Fidelity: https://www.fidelity.co.uk/how-is-my-money-protected/#239206 which says pretty clearly that you would be protected to £85,000 ...


0

What is to prevent someone from buying a share on one exchange and simply selling it in due course on another? In principle, nothing. In practice, it might be simply that your brokers internal systems do not support it, possibly because they use different custodian banks for different exchanges and don't have procedures in place to have a clearing house ...


2

What is to prevent someone from buying a share on one exchange and simply selling it in due course on another? Costs. This include transaction costs, forex costs if in different countries, costs of maintaining a brokerage relationship with multiple entities, legal restrictions, timing if the stock exchanges are in different time zones etc. People assume ...


0

In order to hedge against a potential increase in property prices, I would suggest investing in an ETF which tracks a property index. For example "The FTSE EPRA/NAREIT UK Index offers exposure to UK listed real estate companies and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITS)." BlackRock has one, and I'm sure others do too. Then if the UK market suddenly increases ...


1

Cash ISAs are usually poor investments, their rates are often low and their only benefit is the interest is untaxed. And, for most people, the personal savings allowance 1 makes it moot anyway. For just a year, an old fashioned savings account would suit. Generally, internet only banks offer better rates than the well known high street names. So, go with ...


3

You say that you're planning on buying a house. You don't seem to have any specific need to buy a house, so you can afford to take some risk. You should focus on bonds, but you can have some of your money in stocks. Even if there is a dip in the stock market, it's likely to be accompanied by a dip in the real estate market, so you'll need less to buy the ...


-1

From an investor's point-of-view the question is, does the view of the UK housing market indicate any macro investment opportunities ? For instance if the GBP is expected to decline then a sell position in the GBP/USD would produce about 0.75% rollover interest on the leveraged amount. Then the 45000 number easily takes a 225000 forex position which ...


4

You should be putting it in a cashlike, very low volatility investment, preferably an insured one like a CD or municipal bonds. It might seem clever to put it in the stock market and get a 10% bump, but you could just as easily take a -20% beating. That is called volatility and it's the thing to avoid.


5

In as short a time as a year, the best way to invest money is to simply save it. "A penny saved is a penny earned". Simply not eating out all the time will save you thousands of dollars a year, which is more than most investments will earn, unless you have a large amount in an investment and have some really good stock brokers working for you. For instance, ...


1

Open an account at a discount brokerage and invest in an ultra-short term bond fund -- either a mutual fund or an ETF. The better ones have been yielding as much as 3.8% for the past year, and any downside going forward should be very brief. For example, the bobble in equity markets at the end of 2018, from which some equity funds took a year or more to ...


14

There are no safe one-year investments that pay a high rate of return. If they existed, then everybody would be putting all their money into them. If you want to be confident that the money will still be there in a year's time, just put it into the best bank or building society account you can find. The interest over one year will be negligible anyway. ...


30

The standard answer is that if you need the money soon (less than three or so years), you should not be putting it in risky investments and just park the money in your savings account or similar "safe" holdings. Since you plan to buy in a year, you probably should leave it in your bank account. Sure, you won't gain much interest, but you also sound like you ...


1

Assuming the two shifts you worked were done since the beginning of April then you need to select B. You wouldn't have paid tax on that previous job if it would have fallen within your tax free allowance, however the income is still classed as taxable income and would be added to all other income for the tax year to work out your total tax liability (which ...


4

Given that your employment contract explicitly says it's "fixed-term", I don't think you can say it's permanent. The government site about fixed-term contracts is talking about specific rights that employees on fixed-term contracts get. In that context, I think excluding apprenticeships is just to make it clear that those specific rights don't apply to ...


5

If you have income, you will pay income tax. Your employer has front-loaded your first two months pay, paying more in December, and less in January. This is to your benefit, as you have the use of the money earlier than you would have had the accountant not been on holiday. Your problem with the salary in the contract not matching the offer letter (you ...


1

A donation/contribution to a trust is not considered a gift as long as the beneficiary has a future interest in the gift. If you are referring to a payable on death account than it is the same as your parents leaving you the monies when they die--except it avoids probate. Note that your parents have a large estate exemption so this would only be relevant ...


0

Look for another country that offers "hospitalisation tourism" for your expensive medical operation, e.g. South Korea, Thailand, etc. (update on OP clarify the house mortgage repayment) You can re-mortgage your house with a new term. Since your current mortgage is 20 years, adding extra 20~40k is not going to increase the repayment a lot. Look around for ...


3

You have more than 40% equity in your mortgage, so I would expect that the cheapest way for you to borrow would be to borrow more on that. Either remortgage for a larger amount or your current provider may be willing to loan you more (e.g. https://www.nationwide.co.uk/products/mortgages/borrowing-more/is-borrowing-more-right-for-you). The important ...


0

Many private hospitals and doctors will negotiate a payment plan for an expensive operation. To go this route in the UK you would have to have the operation by a private doctor. In Spain, I assume it is similar in that you would just need to find a hospital that can do the operation and is willing to negotiate a payment plan. One issue is that they may be ...


4

The easiest way I have found is to simply Google the transaction description, or at least the most unique part of it. Googling "PO LTD Telecoms" gives the UK Post Office phone/internet "contact us" page as the first result. Google is sometimes really smart at figuring out what appears to us as a random collection of characters. Beyond that, there are a ...


1

To start, I'd offer some color coding changes: Column F "Purchase cost" should be red since it's a debit Column G "Sale Proceeds" should be blue since it's a credit Column J "Taxable Gain" should be blue for gains and red for losses In the USA, there are 3 ways to determine cost basis (I don't know if these apply to you in the UK): Average Cost FIFO Lot ...


1

Doubtful, as the bank can't give you what they don't have. Many businesses have their credit card agreements running under slightly different, misspelled, abbreviated, or outdated names, and don't bother to ever change them. I know many mom-n-pop shops where the credit card charges appear under the name of the business that closed fifteen years before in ...


0

This seems to be scam. Stay away from it. One cannot legally send cash in box. Depending on the reasons there is tax implications and various provisions of foreign currency management act. The next is more likely someone claiming to be custom official or law enforcement asking for money.


3

Yes, it can. See the guidance here. If you need to claim certain state benefits your LISA savings will normally be taken into account. If you have sufficient savings in your LISA you may not be eligible to receive state benefits. This can potentially put you in a tricky situation, since while the LISA savings can stop you getting benefits, you can’t ...


0

I don’t think anyone here can answer that directly as the details of your personal circumstances can massively affect which benefits you are entitled to. However, in general, yes, savings accounts are taken into consideration when assessing benefits eligibility. Your best bet would be to use one of the (free, anonymous) benefits calculators linked from ...


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