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As others have said, the order depends on your personal scenario. However, after a quick Google search this article translates a similar list into a UK Equivalent and the steps are: Save a 1 month emergency fund Pay off all debt except house / student loan Save 3 months of expenses Max out pension contributions Create sinking funds Pay off home early Build ...


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I think the big difference between the UK and the US is that in most cases you should lower the priority of your student loans, assuming they are the standard government-backed ones for undergraduate degrees. The repayment terms are pretty generous - they'll be written off if you don't eventually pay them back, and you only have to pay back up a certain ...


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The "correct" order varies with your situation. One of the things affecting your situation is which country you are living in. Don't try to apply a simplistic "one size fits all" even within a country. Looking at the differences between the US and UK, you've already identified one - student debt isn't typically as large. That doesn't ...


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There are two aspects to your question: That's not to say that I want to be able to pick specific companies but just companies with more like minded goals. What you are looking for is something called socially conscious or socially responsible investing. There are mutual funds that specifically choose stocks to invest in that are “responsible” or “...


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An IRA is simply an investment account with a status flag flipped from "taxable account" to "IRA" or "Roth IRA". This gives it the tax status of an IRA, and restricts certain transactions e.g. distributions when under age 59-1/2. As such, it is a simple thing for almost anyone who offers investment accounts to offer an IRA ...


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It sounds like you have IRAs with a financial/investment advisor attached. Some firms specialize in this and don't really offer IRAs that you can (easily) manage yourself. These can vary from shady (they invest for the maximum commission) to helpful (you tell them how long until retirement and they do the rest). Regardless, it's your money so you should be ...


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There is nothing about an IRA or Roth IRA that limits you to investing only in mutual funds or ETFs. You can use it to invest in companies you pick. You can invest it in bonds or bond funds. The mechanics of doing so depend on which investment company you are using. The costs and limits are set by their rules. The amount of new money that you can add each ...


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