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4

Strictly-speaking, no, you don’t need a brokerage account to trade ETFs. If you are determined to avoid brokers, you can, but it’s usually not worth the trouble to do that. ETFs are Exchange Traded Funds, so using a broker is the primary way to trade them. Your alternatives to using a broker are to either find someone who wants to sell the ETF you’re ...


1

Open an account with one of the brokers listed at https://monevator.com/compare-uk-cheapest-online-brokers/ . They all have slightly different charging structures, and some may be better for a purely ETF portfolio than others. If you're UK tax resident, you almost certainly want to open an ISA account rather than a regular trading account. You can ...


-1

yes you can do this easily by setting up a brokerage account. Check out fidelity.com; It's free, it's simple to use, and most of all you can invest in stocks, call options, shorts, use margin, etc. Google "brokerage" firms- find one in your area and check out its competitors on Google Finance- and see what they offer you as a customer in the U.K. Check out ...


0

Any given listed stock will have been bought at various prices. Except for perhaps the first very little while after listing, each stock will also have had its ups and downs. So whatever price it has ‘now’ can represent a big profit for one and a big loss for another, and various positions in between. Further, there are different strategies for investment. ...


2

It's some analyst's opinion. It basically means that they think that the stock is going to go down at some point (not necessarily immediately) and you should either sell what you have or, if you're really daring, create a short position. You could also sell covered calls or buy puts if you want to use options to capture downward movements. Note that sell ...


1

I like to follow the mantra of "give some, spend some, save some". It helps one decide no matter how much extra there is, or if this is extra being made over time or a lump sum. In your case, you are citing a range of 30K, which could buy a pretty nice new car. So I would give some, and lean towards 10%. This can be spread across several charities or one ...


0

Putting it in total stock market index funds with a low management expense ratio is statistically the best bet for any long-term investment. At a 10% growth rate (long-term average of the market) 50K would be worth ~541K when you retire. If you follow the 4% rule you should be able to draw down 21.7K extra every year indefinitely which might make your ...


0

1. If you have the plan of "trading" ... So, you will actively buy and sell stocks (say, at least once a week, possibly daily) to profit. ... totally forget it. This is not even worth discussing. Forget it. 2. If you have the idea of "picking stocks" ... So you have the idea that you will sit there, decide on stocks you should buy. You buy them. Over ...


0

Depends on the brokerage fees you have, or expect to have. For example if your broker charges £5 per trade, and you're investing £500, then you're immediately down 1% on your investment. But if the market goes up by 10% every year on average, 1% isn't that much, and you're OK. On the other hand if you're only investing £50, then £5 is 10%. You instantly ...


1

As many as you need for global coverage. It is a big mistake to invest in one market, e.g. just US stocks (recently, US stocks have become so expensive that I might even recommend smaller than ordinary weight for US stocks). Many index funds do precisely that, and are intended not to be your full portfolio, but rather be a part of a well-diversified ...


0

Retirement accounts can be a great way to save for future charitable gifts. Rather than count as an itemized deduction, Qualified Charitable Distributions do not count as income, which helps some retirees benefit from the standard deduction. Without knowing your full circumstances, I cannot comment on what is best for you. The above is for educational ...


0

I agree with @RonJohn would also just add that there are a lot of brokerages out there that offer various MERs on funds that track the same underlying index. Vanguard and iShares are probably the best and offer MERs as low as 0.03% in some cases.


3

The standard Keep It Simple recommendation is a Total Stock Market Index Fund, a Total International Stock Index Fund and a Total Bond Market Fund. https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Three-fund_portfolio If your brokerage doesn't offer them, or don't trust the volatility of emerging market stocks, etc, etc, then an S&P 500 index fund and a high grade ...


0

You have some misconceptions. Trump did not change the tax law, he might of proposed it but congress voted for it and approved it. Furthermore, the change in tax law did not remove the deduction for charitable donations but increased the standard deduction so that fewer people would be able to itemize. In effect simplifying the tax form or many. Formerly, ...


3

Scale your efforts with your funds If we assume investing is not something you mainly do for fun, we can evaluate how much effort you can justify given your portfolio. This becomes fuzzy when you are risk averse or like to learn, but let's just start simple. Scenarios Suppose you have a trivial minimum risk option available, one scenario would be to ...


4

If you don't have 3-6 months expenses saved, I'd probably try to get that nest egg built up before I did any significant investing. You might decide to start investing some smaller sums while contributing the lion's share of your excess to cash savings. Reason being that you don't want to draw from your long-term investments in the case of large unplanned ...


11

The default choice for UK medium size investing should be a "stocks and shares ISA". You can invest in trackers or you can even buy individual stocks this way. A huge range of these standard products is available from UK banks. You can invest up to £20,000 per year this way, and take it out at any time (although not put it back in that year!) If you do it ...


18

If you are able to invest £2000-£3000 a month then you are already in amazing shape if you ask me. That's my entire wage (and that's after tax!!). I invest something like £80 each month, and even that will add up to quite a bit by the time I retire in 40+ years. Not quite sure what the "best investment" is, and it greatly depends on the timeframe you're ...


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Two parter: Part 1: How much money do you need to have before you invest? You want to ensure that you have enough money in liquid form to cover emergency expenses/etc. before you invest in anything. If you lose your job and the market is down you don't want to have to touch your investment. I would keep enough money to cover 6 months of expenses/rent/...


46

Any amount greater than 0 is fine really.* Investing great lump sums is akin to timing the market, just set a monthly target and stick to it.** Consistency over the long term is the key to success. This is a marathon, not a sprint. [*] just make sure you use a low fee broker(some even offer promotional 0 fees choices) and ETF investing (a mixture of bonds/...


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I agree with most -- perhaps all -- of the advice already given, but one point has not been raised, by either the OP or any of the answers. What are your career prospects? You have just gone from $25/hour to $50/hour -- a handsome raise. You must have done a lot of things right, from the point of view of your employer. If you concentrate on your current ...


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