New answers tagged

1

The screen shows a conversion of currency. Consider this: 5000x(155.27 close - 153.09 ave price) = 10900 dollars gain 10900/8737.85 = 1.25 dollars per pound conversion rate


0

Operating Income or Loss and a Net Income. Is it the same ? No - companies can have revenue and expenses that are not based on the actual operations of the company - interest paid on debt is a common example. Net Income starts with the Operating Income (Operating Revenue minus Operating Expenses) ,and adds/subtracts any non-operating revenue/expenses. For ...


0

NO -- Operating Income is NOT the same as Revenue. This company is a weird example - it looks like it's going BK. But, an example: Revenue = $100 --- Payroll = ($30) --- Office Rent = ($20) --- Operating Income => $50


2

Nanoman explained the Lost Decade, and that explains the period from the late 1980s through around 2003; massive growth (that was far more than it should have been) followed by a massive collapse both due to that being a bubble, and demographic pressures that still exist today. However, the period after 2003 is not really particularly similar. Starting ...


3

For what it is worth, if you work in some regulated industries an employer CAN make you provide access to your investments for compliance checking. Mine does, as do most of the other big Accounting firms. They can't do anything except see what my investments are, not even sure if they see the dollar amounts. At my company they download it every day and ...


0

The simplest way to determine the return of an asset is to take the ending value and divide it by the starting value. Let's build that up in terms of how complex you may want to get: 1) If you start with $100 in the bank, they pay you $2 in interest, and you end the year with $102. 102 / 100 = 102%, and after subtracting the 100% you started with, this is a ...


0

This is not easy. It is made harder by there being several measures of return. One is money-weighted rate of return and the other is time-weighted rate of return. If you did not make any changes, the return is 100*(market_value_now / market_value_3mo_ago - 1). This formula requires that there are no dividends, or that you wish to exclude dividends from the ...


2

They have no way of getting electronic access unless you give it to them, or if they get a court order. Does that mean they can look at my investments? Maybe. For some positions they can ask periodically for financial information. They are looking for items on your credit history/file that will point to a financial problem, that would show you as an ...


1

No, your employer can very likely not see your private investment portfolio. Not unless you are making those investments through the company itself (like with an employee stock options program). Rules can exist even without an easy way to detect any infraction. Internal rules against insider trading exist in most publicly traded companies, because insider ...


9

"The fact that that exists appears to indicate that they would have a way to see if an employee was engaged in this." Are you suggesting that laws only exist when there is surveillance of your compliance? Petty theft is illegal even if there is no camera looking at the till. To answer your question, no your employer cannot see your investment holdings ...


21

The Japanese economy has had a unique history, with a huge bubble in the 1980s and a long unwinding afterward. I don't see why that would result in a market that appears to have brief periods of growth. If anything, I'd expect their recent economic history to produce a market that goes straight down, rather than inconsistently hovering back up. Apart ...


1

The broker will let you make this trade, although probably not allow you to sell the 151 call after you buy the spread. The systems are smart enough to know that the 151 call is protecting you from infinite potential losses. You should never need to "exercise" this spread, or be forced to buy any stock. Just close out the spread on expiration day or sooner. ...


1

You should try prefixing your stocks with the correct exchange. For example try NASDAQ:FB (Facebook listed on Nasdaq) instead of just FB, or try NYSE:IBM (IBM listed on NYSE Exchange) instead of just IBM. Please note that as of late 2019 when the referenced article below was published, "Google Finance’s sheets integration ... doesn’t include most ...


4

Assuming you are sure you want to make the move (and I agree, I did the same): The best time is when they are (both) rather low. That way, you 'harvest' losses for taxes. You get less when selling, but you also pay less when buying, which about evens out. This is true for any taxable investments, so do it on a (near) bottom-day. It does of course not apply ...


7

The only certain things about investing are taxes and fees. So, calculate how much you lose to taxes when making the transition. Calculate how much you would save on fees every year after making the transition. You didn't specify the details of the taxation scheme. I'm not familiar with US tax system, but at least in Finland we pay 30% capital gains tax on ...


13

To me, there are two great reasons to invest passively. The first is that it is impossible to time to market. Bargains may come along and you may choose to do some individual stock investment then, but it will be for meaningless amounts of your portfolio (< 5%). The second is that you are far better off concentrating on your chosen career then trying ...


-3

If you can put zero down, then do it. Your loan rate is what 3 to 3.5%. So for 30 years you'll have the lowest loan rate you'll probably ever have and probably get to itemize your deductions. Imagine getting only 8% return for the stock market for 30 years on 135k.... 1.3 Million. AND all stocks are ON SALE! Year This Year's Return Total Returns Total ...


2

Risk is exchanged in finance, because not every investor has the same risk tolerance. Risk in finance is most simply defined as volatility in future returns - it does not mean the same thing as 'loss'. If you put $100 in the bank and it pays 2% interest, you will end the year with $102. Depending on your country, your government probably guarantees that ...


4

Common advice given is that if you decide to become an active or passive investor, you should stick with the choice you've made. That you're less likely to be successful if you try to pursue both active and passive investing strategies. Do you have a source for this? That advice is so very wrong. It suggests, that once you make a choice you can never ever ...


18

Short answer: It probably makes sense to avoid the PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance), but it ultimately depends on how probable it is that you are unable to pay the monthly installments with/without the extra savings. Long answer: While i am not an expert on the specifics of the US mortgage market (I presume the question pertains to US), it seems that a ...


4

Common advice given is that if you decide to become an active or passive investor, you should stick with the choice you've made. No you shouldn't. It is perfectly fine to supplement an active portfolio by passive index funds, or to supplement an index fund portfolio with several carefully chosen stocks. What is bad advice is to buy lots of various active ...


5

Yes, it could mean selling low and buying high, but it could also mean selling high and buying low. There really is no way to know. Because it is inside an HSA, there are no immediate tax implications; you don’t have to worry about paying capital gains or triggering wash sale rules as you might if you were liquidating and rebuying in a taxable account. ...


4

Is it possible to trade these commodities on the stock market? No. Commodities are traded in a commodities market. Stock markets are for stocks. Please do a lot of research prior to executing trades it is akin to options investing. However you can trade companies that benefit from increasing prices in oil and gas. For example Exxon or for a more ...


1

When you are buying CSPX, which uses USD as Base Currency, the FX issue comes in two forms: One-time transaction fee. Exchange rate change over a period of time. The first part, one-time transaction fee, is dependent on whether the conversion is performed by your own Bank, or by a Market Maker that aims to maintain no-arbitrage condition between CSPXN.MX, ...


-2

So, right now Brent Crude is at 28.16$ (it was above 70$ this time last year, and it hasn't ever gone below 30$ since at least 2016). For various reasons I'm 100% sure that the oil price will go up in a timeframe of years, and the same will happen with natural gas. There's a fair likelihood that oil price is going to be more expensive in the future. But, it ...


1

Norbert's Gambit only saves you on the one-time transaction fees. It does not help you "lock-in" an exchange rate over a period (e.g. a year). To prevent the exchange rate from moving, you need Leveraged Forex or Canadian Dollar Futures. The concept is like this. Suppose 1 USD = 1.45 CAD. Before Stock Purchase: Stock (USD) 0 Cash (USD) 0 ...


20

As long as I can buy it today and sell it at a date of my choosing Typically investors don't purchase shares representing indefinite ownership of commodities, instead they are traded as futures. Oil Futures have a settlement date, i.e. they expire and you have to buy them again. Let's take a look at NYMEX WTI Light Sweet Crude Oil futures. Here we can ...


7

What are good areas for me focus on that are likely to see eventual high gains without requiring too high an effort or understanding in trading from me? A low-cost stock market index fund. Preferably one that is internationally diversified. If you can't find an internationally diversified stock market index fund for low cost, buy market-specific funds to ...


2

Since I want to exploit the current low market I assume that would mean targeting areas hit worse by the Corona fears, but I honestly don't know what industries those are or how to target them with minimal investment experience. A popular brokerage firm provides a large group of sector mutual funds which depict the sectors hardest hit by coronavirus. The ...


0

Find companies that have a large loss of revenue and a large amount of debt and those companies are at risk of re-organization in bankruptcy. The lower debt companies in recent history have been the newer technology companies. One measure to consider is the debt-to-equity ratio. And certainly consider revenue.


-1

I would personally recommend Airline industry. Airline stock prices have dropped drastically in the past couple of weeks, and they had a good probability of climbing back up after this passes. I wouldn't go all-in at once, but definitely airlines. Some Examples: DAL (Delta Air Lines) JBLU (JetBlue) BA (Boeing) (more risky kinda) AAL (American Airlines)


1

The price is vulnerable to the inscrutable politics of Saudi Arabia. In 2016 they defied all expectations of $100 to $85 WTI oil in order to put the shale oil industry out of business, taking the price down to $24. And still they failed to put the shale oilers out of business. Now they are driving the price down to hurt Russia? With out-of-left-field ...


-3

I had $1M for 3½ months, I would put ~$900k in four 3-month CDs (if you can find them) and use ~$100k as the underwriting for a payday advance company. Getting in contact with the right people will take some work though. This could give $10-15k in gains, even considering the current economic climate. Others might not like my idea, but you asked for ...


1

Unfortunately there's not a simple answer since "crude oil" is a very broad spectrum. From the supply side, oil is produced in multiple locations across the globe, and with varying properties (e.g. "sour" crude contains more sulfur and thus is cheaper, but requires special equipment to be usable to refineries. It can also be traded between countries, so ...


-2

How would I do a supply and demand analysis for crude oil? List the reasons you might think oil price is going up. List the reasons you might think oil price is going down. I think you'll find it's way too hard to calculate a "fair value" for a barrel of oil. Oil is a commodity, and as such, its price is extremely volatile. Thus, by predicting its price, ...


1

I'm currently making below the poverty line, but I'm getting by. 20k alone invested today isn't going to prepare you for retirement. At an 8% average return, in 30 years you'll have about $200k, which isn't a lot to live on today and will likely get worse as expenses like health care (which will be increasingly more important to you as you get older) rise ...


1

I'm specifically looking for a low-risk, low-maintenance option that makes the most sense over a long period time (30 years-ish?). If you lived in Finland, and if you were lucky enough to find joint forest ownership for sale, I would recommend investing into a joint forest. It's low-risk, low-maintenance option, definitely. However, I'm in my 30s, living ...


2

If you don't expect to need the money for the next 30+ years, the best thing you can do is invest in the stock market. The return on investment for CDs is abysmal. They're only a good choice if you need absolute certainty that your investment won't lose value (or, won't lose value too quickly after adjusting for inflation). Real estate is risky, ...


0

What I would do (which I think is the safest given the circumstances) is to take advantages of the welcome offers most of the bank have. They are offering around $500+ cash if you open an account and leave your money typically about 90 day. Most of well known banks here in US offering this bonus cash. If you can do this persistently do this for say four ...


0

TrailingCrypto is a service that works with many Cryptocurrency brokers and they offer a tool called OCO (order cancels order) that achieves exactly what you're asking for. Here is an article describing it: https://www.trailingcrypto.com/support/article/oco-order-cancels-order


1

Of course, I would always consult a fiduciary investment advisor. I would imagine my investment advisor would recommend investing the money long-term in a diversified allocation portfolio, possible refinance the land debt (when interest rates drop lower, hopefully soon) and service the land debt from the growth/income from the invested money.


23

In addition to R.Hamilton's answer (upvoted), I would add that there is some not insignificant risk at the moment of financial crisis #2 due to the demand and supply shocks, (covid 19 + oil market drops ), overstretched corporate borrowing, and central banks having run out of ammo trying to keep 2007 on ice. I think it would be very wise to split the money ...


4

Possibly, invest the funds long-term and re-finance the land debt from a position of better credit standing. Also, close to 50% of the funds in a brokerage account can be taken out of the account on margin and institutional margin rates can be found. Then an interest-only loan can be developed such that simply future performance of the investment possibly ...


5

Unless you want take a more significant risk, that's probably anout the best you can do. Investing it into the market - bonds or ETFs or even shares - would give you a chance to earn a lot on it, but also to lose a lot on it. With a short time horizon like this, you would not be able to recover losses. If you had ten years, the recommendation would be to ...


109

If you need that money for a payment 3 1/2 months away, then you need to be extremely risk averse. Maybe even to the point that you may want to spread that $1mil to several banks to stay under the FDIC limits of $250k/account. You will not get great return, but you will be sure to have it when you want it such a short time away.


0

Having a fix percentage is going to be a nightmare to maintain but it's perfectly fine to have some numbers to use for measurement. One important factor to consider is that when you don't have much money to investment you don't have much money to lose so at that time it doesn't matter too much how your investments are divided. It's also important to know why ...


2

Unless you're somehow already wealthy at 18, you probably shouldn't be investing in stocks and bonds at all. Instead, you should invest in yourself, by earning a college degree. That will ensure that you can earn enough to invest properly and retire later. If you have any money left over after paying for college and having an emergency fund equal to at ...


4

This is a fundamentally opinion based issue but I feel at 18 your plan had two flaws. Firstly it is a bit too risk averse. You have many years to invest and bonds tend to give very poor yields in the long term. Second you have no international exposure. In most cases if you have a longer time horizon it can be worth having some international funds. I would ...


0

No. The younger you are the more risk you should take. No bonds or dividends.


0

If you are asking such questions, then your level of readiness is zero. You are NOT ready. You do NOT understand it at all. Financial markets are suited only for very small group of people with distinctive and very narrow types of personality. Everyone who does not meet knowledge and personality criteria will fail miserably. "Invest" your money into your ...


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