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2

This is a follow-on to @SimonB's excellent answer. People have been worried about hyperinflation ever since the aggressive QE (Quantitative Easing, aka buying government bonds to increase the money supply) of 11 years ago. But, as @SimonB mentioned, it hasn't happened. What is the best thing to do in my situation to at least prevent my fund from being ...


3

Base rates have been low for many years now, and high inflation hasn't happened yet. The central banks are monitoring inflation rates, and will adjust the base rates if necessary. To a large extent, the point of keeping interest rates low is to discourage people from hoarding large amounts of money in cash savings. If the interest rate is below the rate ...


2

You've got an interesting theory, but you likely won't be able to actually implement it. Essentially, the IRS wants your tax money during the tax year and not just when you file the return. In fact, the IRS refers to income tax as a "pay as you go" tax. Even self-employed individuals (who have no employer with whom to file a W4) are usually required to ...


6

If the loan doesn't have a pre-payment penalty, then the typical loan doesn't require a doubling of the monthly payment to cut the loan period in half. while it would seem that the doubling the payment would cut the term in half, in fact the additional money when it lowers the balace quicker also saves reduces the amount of interst paid each month. I used ...


1

The country with the high interest rate deposit accounts: might every well have restrictions on taking that money out of the country. Otherwise, everyone in the world would be doing what you suggested and the Ukraine would go broke within weeks, and has a very good reason for offering those high rate deposit accounts; currency instability is one that leaps ...


0

If you decide to move, and it's so hard to find a replacement, you should consider paying someone to take over your lease. After all, you're saving $300 per month.


5

As others already mentioned, 1300 is quite a lot of money to just walk away from, especially for someone who would consider moving to an appartment that costs 'only' 500. So, consider these scenarios for the next 12 months: Find a new tenant now, then move Total cost: 500*12 = 6000 Find a new tenant in coming month, then move Total cost: 800 + 500*11 = ...


0

I think you haven't really thought this through. I don't know wher eyou live, but there are two possible scenarios: Too many flats or too many renters. If there are too few flats available, as in many larger cities, finding a replacement should be quite easy. By the sounds of things it was hard to find the 500$ room, so I guess this is the case in your city....


2

From financial point of view, you will be worse-off short-term but better off in a few months time, as you can see from some other answers. But I think you fail to take into account that the time is ticking, and the room may not be available. Furthermore, it might come with its own issues which your current accommodation doesn't have. Should those issues ...


36

In the United States the security deposit is to cover damages you make to the apartment or common areas. It is not to allow you to skip out of the contract. Frequently you are responsible for finding a person to take over the lease, but they still must be approved by the owner or their representative. If you do terminate the lease early you are generally ...


18

Since $1300/$300 = 4.333, it'll take you a bit over four months to recoup the lost $1,300 deposit. So... all else being equal and you plan on living in the $500/month apartment for five months, it makes mathematical sense to move if you also have enough cash for the deposit on the $500 apartment. HOWEVER "all else" is rarely equal! Why is the $500 ...


2

He'll lose money in two ways: 1. The value of his money will decline with inflation. Inflation in the US has been running about 2% per year, so he'll effectively lose 2% every year. 2. There's the opportunity cost of the money he COULD make if he invested the money in some way. For example, the stock market has been averaging about 7% per year over the ...


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