New answers tagged

4

You are falling for the coca-cola fallacy. When buying smaller container of CC you pay more per ounce than buying large container, so the higher price must be due to desire to push people to buy bigger ones. Here it means that Printer with Ink is cheaper than Ink itself then it means company want to sell the printers. So you assume that selling more is ...


12

Yes, you are missing something. Missing is the fact that 'starter' cartridges have a fraction of the ink of the full, new cartridge. Say the new printer on sale is $100. And the set of replacement cartridges is $120. It's not the same volume of ink, searching shows it's about 1/4 or so. The new printer contains $30 worth of ink, and is only worth buying if ...


-3

If you can put zero down, then do it. Your loan rate is what 3 to 3.5%. So for 30 years you'll have the lowest loan rate you'll probably ever have and probably get to itemize your deductions. Imagine getting only 8% return for the stock market for 30 years on 135k.... 1.3 Million. AND all stocks are ON SALE! Year This Year's Return Total Returns Total ...


18

Short answer: It probably makes sense to avoid the PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance), but it ultimately depends on how probable it is that you are unable to pay the monthly installments with/without the extra savings. Long answer: While i am not an expert on the specifics of the US mortgage market (I presume the question pertains to US), it seems that a ...


13

The critical question is posed in a comment by BernhardDöbler: do you need this money soon? The danger in selling is that you may be following the pattern of many casual investors: fear of missing out drives them to buy stocks when the market is very strong and then fear of losing all drives them to sell when the market is very weak. They end up "buying ...


4

There is no sure prediction of the future, but historically, the markets recover quickly (within months, at max up to three years). Taking your money out after the markets dropped is typically a way to lock in the losses, and miss the rebounds. Going into bonds means to lose again when the market go up. Nobody knows for sure, but the professional ...


-7

possibly switch to bond funds instead of stock funds


0

Well, the U.S. overnight bank rate is 1.25% but that rate is not currently available to investors in short-term government bonds and is not expected to survive much longer in special-rate bank deposits. Since a fund or a savings account is required for on-going deposits, then the likely choices are a 2.2 year duration investment-grade corporate-bond fund, a ...


7

Imagine if you had put your funds into a diversified equity mutual fund 2 weeks ago. You might have lost ~15-20% of the value of your downpayment savings. In a scenario where you need funds on the short term [and 3 years is short term for these purposes], you want to take on as little risk as possible. That means a savings account, or some form of a ...


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