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I have never seen such an arrangement in practice, but there's nothing stopping someone from making one up. The main problem with such a scheme is that it needs to be reasonably priced. If you exchange a home worth X for some financial arrangement, that financial arrangement also needs to be worth X. If you (and presumably the seller) expect the housing ...


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What you propose is a variant of rent-to-own, so you may find something useful in that space. With rent-to-own, you can somewhat hedge a future decline in the home's value (as you seek), by acquiring an option to buy the house (and renting it in the meantime) rather than buying it up front. If the value declines, you can walk away and instead buy a house at ...


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You ask about legal impediments but you don't specify a jurisdiction. I'm hard-pressed to imagine that a country would outlaw such an arrangement but there are an awful lot of countries in the world. You'd certainly be free to negotiate such a contract in the US. On the other hand, it is highly unlikely that such an arrangement would be practical. You'd ...


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This is a job for an appraiser. You can find a local (to the property) appraiser through Yelp or Google, or ask your favorite realtor for referrals. Appraisers are trained to valuate property and can provide valuation for a specific date. This is a common practice, and your scenario (step up basis of an inherited property) is not at all unique. It would ...


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For a student in germany, the biggest effect of owning property is on student financial support that you may or may not get: BAFöG (education benefits provided by the state) will take that property into account. Exemption limits on personal property are very low, so it will make a difference if you own it or if your parents own it. many Studentenwohnheime (...


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The thing that jumps out as the most risky is the bit about "co-owning" the house. This is generally a very bad idea unless you are married to the co-owner living in the house with a close family member. Don't co-sign for a house loan with a boyfriend/girlfriend/roommate/friend, etc. It could destroy your credit and your relationship with them


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