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Anything that lets someone do something with your property is an asset to that person, and a liability to you. So both the lease and the option are assets to the tenant, and liabilities to the estate. The only assets that the estate has is the property and the $25,000 payment (either as cash or accounts receivable, as the case may be). The estate is pretty ...


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The RBI master directions on "Acquisition and Transfer of Immovable Property under Foreign Exchange Management Act" has all the information on this: https://www.rbi.org.in/Scripts/BS_ViewMasDirections.aspx?id=10196 As per it, you can't pay for it outside India. It states: "NRIs or OCIs may make payment, if any, for transfer of immovable property out of ...


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Be careful of keeping your money in a bank in the foreign country. If the country is risky the banks could go under or even communists could come to power and seize your money. There is also currency risk ( local currency could be devalued )


1

Some thoughts that came into my mind when reading your post - hopefully, some of them are beneficial to you; First of all, compared to others who start into their career and might plan to go abroad you have a more solid financial background - e.g. you have an 80k loan but a house, while others have no house but a student loan. So, that's definitely an ...


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Your current assets are small compared to what you can expect to earn in a lifetime and compared to what you will need for retirement. Fortunately, you are young and have decades more to save. Many people are in something like your situation of starting out, say with a graduate degree, in their late 20s or early 30s, but with no savings at all and perhaps ...


2

It's something that needs careful planning. Do you know anything whatsoever about the market for your profession in Canada or New Zealand? Any idea how difficult it is to get a work visa? Any idea what happens to your pension rights in the UK? Before I moved, I had six job interviews in my pocket, and one of them turned into a job. So be prepared, and have ...


0

I find your math very confusing, and you ignore any repairs and risks to your houses. Also, if you have 1 000 000 to start with, you can simply invest it, and draw about 5000 $ a month. If you find the stock market to unnerving, you can buy an annuity which will pay you (risk-free) 4200 $ per month for the rest of your life; or you can mix the two ...


1

I would strongly discourage it. You could find a 'limited service' broker to list your house on the MLS and put on a lock box for about $500 and then the other agents would deal with you directly. You would then pay them if they found you a buyer (usually 3% and you would have to pay this if you had your license too). I got my license in the year 2003 when ...


3

Unless your jurisdiction requires a realtor, I think that it's a bit of overkill to become a realtor in order to save the commissions involved. There's a financial as well as time cost to become a realtor and apart from that, you can do it yourself. I've bought and sold several homes myself. When selling, I did my due diligence and figured out what the ...


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I think you mean to say what is the role of the Broker? To be honest I don't know the answer, but certainly with home price rising 3% for seller Agent and 3% to buying Agent does not make sense. Look at SFO area, for selling part you can do Sell by Owner, but when you are buying, the sellers some time do not understand that if buyer does not have agent, it ...


1

It could vary by location, but my experience and recollection are that sellers usually pay agent fees. So the larger part of your numbers ($30K) wouldn't be an issue. To the selling of your current property, consult a lawyer / state laws, but as Dugan alludes there typically aren't rules that require you to have a real estate agent. If you use the same ...


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A Realtor (agent or broker) brings much more to the table than simply their license. Even if we assume you will absorb all the knowledge and skill a realtor has (in order to help you price the home correctly, show it, work through negotiations, work through the closing, and so on), Realtors are also a gateway for buyers and sellers to gain access to ...


1

This is really a question for an elder law attorney but roughly-speaking, what that means is: Americans who cannot private-pay for their care can receive government-funded care in a nursing home. The government will start making payments only after the senior has exhausted their own assets, including cash assets (bank accounts, stocks, bonds, etc), real ...


0

Consider this: Any inspection, or practically any inspection, will find some faults that would need fixing. It's normal. When we negotiate the price for a house, it's based on the assumption of a normal number of faults. If the inspection finds nothing wrong at all, then the buyer is getting a bargain. The terms make it clear that if there is a normal ...


7

(Disclaimer: I work for a company that does housing contract negotiations daily, but IANAL.) Are we basically writing a contract with no teeth in regard to the inspection - no money back clause? Sorta. The contract is a "point in time" negotiation: it says, at the time it was written, you will not be making any repairs (under the assumption no repairs ...


2

You need to look at how title is held. Did you take ownership as 'tenants in common' or 'joint tenants'? 'Tenants in Common' allows for specific (unequal) shares of ownership, while 'Joint Tenants' implies equal ownership. I've owned a few properties with unequal ownership situations, and used 'tenants in common' to reflect the ownership percentages. For ...


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I think your broker is correct. Item 2 is to clarify expectations and prevent any perception that discounts or repairs are being offered. It does not say that the buyer forfeits the earnest money just by asking for a change in terms. The contract has been accepted by both parties; either of you is free to propose changes (attempt to renegotiate), and unless ...


18

You've essentially made an "as-is" condition. You're letting it be known that you're inflexible on that item; they shouldn't bother trying to negotiate money back at closing or repairs prior to closing. If they try anyway and you decline, they don't forfeit earnest money; they're still within their rights to terminate based on inspection results so long as ...


1

To boil down the @DJClayworth answer to it's essence: The only thing he has put into my house is ... his name on the deed, which makes him co-owner, and thus partner and co-controller of the house (lacking any other written agreement).


4

You need to talk to a lawyer. sevensevens is right. Your father owns half the house, because you signed a legal agreement that says that. He can very reasonably demand to live there. He can probably force you to sell. And he will probably get half the value of the house when you do sell. However you should talk to a lawyer because nothing is always cut and ...


2

Sell the house and use your half to buy a house you can get approved for on just your income Now he's threatening to force me to sell the house and take half the money if I don't allow him back. Does he have the right to do this? Probably. He owns 1/2 the house. Even if he doesn't he can cause you quite a few problems while a court decides. The only ...


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