New answers tagged

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In my experience, some UK investment platforms list the US domiciled ETFs alongside regular US stocks, but it's only when you attempt to actually invest in those ETFs that you will get some message about it not being allowed due to the lack of a KID, at least until you manage to convince the platform that you are a sufficiently "sophisticated" ...


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These are not industry conventions. NRA W/H means Non-Resident Alien Withholding Tax. REV could mean anything e.g. Revenue, Reversed, Revised. Ask the broker who designed this description.


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I have RSUs and in-the-money stock options granted by my company, both vested. I've held the RSUs for over a year, so I understand that when selling, I would pay long-term capital gains tax on the increase in price since the date of vesting. Correct. The stock options are unexercised, so I understand that if I were to exercise-and-sell, I would pay short-...


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Settlement for equities is T+2 or two days (options are T+1). Fidelity may have in house restrictions that take longer. That, you should take up with them.


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Stocks represent legal ownership in companies. Hopefully, those companies are actively creating value (by producing usable goods, or services, etc.). That value creation leads to profits. Those profits legally belong to shareholders. Shareholders vote for the Board of Directors. BoD appoints the CEO, and ultimately sets a dividend policy. If the BoD [legally ...


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IG lists US ETF's and allows UK investors to purchase. They ask for a W-8BEN form to be filled (takes seconds).


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The Intelligent Investor was written 73 years ago. Times have changed and the modern equivalent ratio is debt-to-equity ratio. It is essentially 1/(Stock Equity Ratio). Reference: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/debtequityratio.asp


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To state the basics, revenues/profits/earnings/EPS are accounting figures that tell you how the company is doing in its business. Stock price changes and dividends tell you how well the stockholders are doing in their investment.


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A company hopefully if profitable. When they are one way to express that is using earnings per share. If they have profit of $1 Billion and they have $1 Billion shares then the earnings per share is $1. Of course companies that aren't profitable have losses per share. Many famous technology companies had losses in their early years as they built their ...


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its me, the asker of the question I think we should go by this model as : To understand the concept of DCF Terminal Value, we must know that after a period of growth, a company reaches a “steady state” which is when all sources of competitive advantage are exhausted and its profitability and efficiency ratios are stabilized. The steady-state period typically ...


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It's derived from the formula for a growing perpetual annuity. The present value of a perpetual annuity is the initial cash flow (the payment after one period) divided by the discount factor minus the growth rate (C1/(r-g)) - you can look up the derivation of that formula offline. So if we treat all of the cash flows after year N as a growing perpetual ...


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Preferred "stock" can be classified as either debt or equity depending on the terms of the securities. If the stock behaves more like as a bond, for example if it is redeemable for a fixed amount on a fixed date (like a bond) or if it is "putable", meaning it can be redeemed by the holder at a fixed price, then it may be more classified ...


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Short answer: no. I am pretty darn sure that the only requirements to be a publicly traded company is that said company meets all the standards to be public traded and files the necessary forms correctly and on-time with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which will then make those forms publicly available. http://www.legalandcompliance.com/securities-...


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It makes no sense to invest in a stock solely because it pays a dividend. Dividends do not provide total return. Only share price appreciation does so. Though taxed as income, dividends are not income. You should be investing in high quality companies that are leaders in their sector with strong, growing free cash flow, low debt, and good management. If ...


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It's not crazy to invest in the US - any non-US investors buying a 'global' fund are paying a withholding tax on US dividends within that fund. This article discusses reducing the tax to 15% by personally claiming your country's tax treaty or by investing in an ETF that can claim a tax treaty. For individual high-yield stocks, if you believe the US stocks ...


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The primary risk of a corporate bond (other then government interest rates) is the risk that the bond defaults, leaving you with at best a fraction of the original bond amount. The ratings are meant to be a rough probability of the bond defaulting. Stocks have much different risks, since they are tied more directly to the performance (really the precieved ...


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Your numbers and the calculator in your link make no sense to me. If this is a cash transaction, you can only buy 1,416 shares with $100k. If this is the USA and you're utilizing Reg T 50% margin then you could buy 2,833 shares. Therefore, I have no clue how you can buy 3,333 shares with $100k. As for this concept of only risking 2% of your capital to the ...


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The Board of Directors decides whether or not to issue a dividend. Who are the Board of Directors? The people that the owners vote to to be their "proxy overseers" above the CEO and President. If you don't like the fact that you aren't getting a dividend, vote for a new slate of Directors who promise to issue a dividend. Practically, though, for a ...


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No. The definition of a shareholder is a partial owner of the company. Whether a dividend is paid has nothing to do with it. Just like any company, the owners might decide they would rather re-invest the profits back into the company so it can grow instead of taking those profits as dividends. As a shareholder you have a say in whether they pay dividends, ...


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There are many questions on this site about dividends or the lack of dividends. If the company wants to use the profits to expand the business instead of paying dividends they can do so. They can also save the profits waiting for opportunities to invest in other businesses. These decisions are made either by the board of directors, or the shareholders using ...


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No there isn't. There is an official registry of ticker symbols but everything else has no fixed registry. Words in the market come and go. So do abbreviations. My personal belief is that the abbreviations exist to tell who is on the inside and who is on the outside. I do not think that they exist to speed up communication, though they probably did when ...


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I agree with you that return indices are more relevant than price indices for most investors, especially in the long term. Yet, while most price indices are calculated and disseminated quite frequently during the trading hours, most return indices are calculated and disseminated only once a day and after the markets are closed. This is described, for example,...


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The news organizations use a simple method of expressing what happened on Wall street today: Dow, S&P 500, and NASDAQ. An all news radio station where I live gives these numbers 4 times an hour. For the average person that tells them everything they think they need to know about what is happening in the stock market. Most don't understand what they mean ...


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You can request refund for up to 3 years after the initial tax return was due. For the year 2018 it was due in April 2019 - the 3-year period will pass in April. Generally, after the three-year window closes, the IRS can neither send a refund for the specific tax year. nor apply any credits, including overpayments of estimated or withholding taxes, to ...


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There are a variety of reasons why multiple stock exchanges came into existence: I would say that the primary reason for the existence of multiple stock exchanges is that they are businesses started by investors, whether they be actual traders or businessmen. For example, the NYSE was begun by a group of investors circa 1800 who met under a buttonwood tree ...


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Consider times before the fast and efficient electronic communications. How would a trader from Chicago have an efficient access to an exchange in New York? So historically many major cities had an exchange, some (like NYSE, LSE, etc) more popular than others (e.g.: Have you heard about the San Francisco stock exchange?). Over time, as communications and ...


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From CQM, on a related question: Stock exchanges are most often times private companies that compete with other exchanges, so that also promotes the existence of many exchanges.


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Most preferred stocks in the US are issued at $25 and they are callable in 5 years. Preferred stocks are a hybrid of common stock and a bond. Because of the bond like nature (yield), they are affected by interest rates. As rates rise, preferred stocks drop and vice versa. Occasionally you might see a $25 preferred around $30 but that's more the exception ...


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How can I can convert ticker symbols ... to an International Securities Identification Number (ISIN) ... ? As @Indian Rediff said in this answer, it is not possible in general to convert or map stock ticker symbols to ISIN's or vice versa using a number of rules or a mathematical function. However, you can find out the ISIN for a stock by searching for its ...


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You can find out the ticker symbols and exchanges worldwide associated with a stock or fixed-income instrument by looking up the security's ISIN on Stock Market MBA. It is not only free (at least for now) but also has extensive coverage based on the data from OpenFIGI whose supporters include Bloomberg.


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How are so many stocks tradable via Frankfurt that are not listed there? The Frankfurt Stock Exchange has a "Freiverkehr" ("Open Market") segment for trading in such securities. The Open Market is classified as a Multilateral Trading Facility (MTF) according to European Union MiFID rules. Such a facility allows trading in securities at a ...


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"How are so many stocks tradable via Frankfurt that are not listed there?" More than 95% of nearly 13500 stocks trading in the Frankfurt Stock Exchange (FSE) as of December 2021 are not listed there. (1) This is because FSE allows a stock, if already listed on another exchange it recognizes as a “like-exchange”, to become merely tradable easily and ...


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If I have say a 401k account, and say I sell some of my stocks in there, but I don't pull the money out of my account, is the only tax involved the capital gains tax? Or will I pay my income tax on it and the 10% extra tax for people before 65 (I am younger than 65)? First of all the key age if it applied it would be 59.5 not 65. Selling things within the ...


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