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After a bit of searching, I found a Wall Street Journal article from 2012, MetLife Settles Unclaimed Life-Benefit Probe, and a follow-up article the same year Michigan Joins Metlife Settlement Regarding Unclaimed Life Insurance Benefits. Apparently, MetLife was involved in a class action suit in 2012 regarding their practice of closing life insurance ...


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The answer is well described under the wikipedia page on Whole Life insurance maturity: A whole life policy is said to "mature" at death or the maturity age of 100, whichever comes first. To be more exact the maturity date will be the "policy anniversary nearest age 100". The policy becomes a "matured endowment" when the insured person lives past the ...


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It’s mostly historical. Bottom line is there doesn’t have to be a specific reason for it, it’s just the way companies tend to do it. Dividends are just one way of paying a bit more of a return on premiums to a policy owner. Higher return on the cash value in a UL policy is another way. Dividends are then basically a marketing technique and a way for the ...


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I congratulate you on thinking outside of the box. Another reason to eschew debt, in this life, is it eliminates the need for life insurance which becomes costly in later years. Term life is a great buy, when you and your children are young and the loss of one parent would be devastating to both the surviving spouse and children. So where will you be in ...


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Note: I am not a lawyer; this is not legal advice. The situation is likely to vary by state. It is likely to get complicated unless either (a) Daniel is a direct issue (child/grandchild etc.) of the Hiberts, or (b) their trust contains explicit clauses as to what should happen in the event of Daniel dying before the last of the Hiberts. If neither of those ...


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