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While there are good answers, I feel one aspekt is missing: Regularly (at least once in eight weeks, doublecheck your local/bank rules) check your bank account for any irregular withdrawels. As the setting you described screams "illegal activity", they could try to fake a sepa direct debit mandate to get your money. When you notice anything like ...


2

I recall being involved in a nonprofit organization where someone had used a personal PayPal account to collect conference registration feeds and then forwarded it to the organization; it ended up being a major finding the next time there was an internal audit (which lead to a very tense meeting about the organization's finances). Point being, it is not ...


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This is all from a US perspective. I lived in Canada for a long time, but most of my complicated banking experience is based on my 30 years in the states I think @bta has a good answer as to why the bank reacted to your pleas the way they did. If someone forges your name on a check, then the correct response is to go to the police. The bank will furnish ...


6

when I first gave them the IBAN for the bank account they said they were not collaborating with that (admittedly minor) bank and asked me to open an account with another bank from a list (all of them reputable and well known banks.) IBAN is a universal payment method, and is standard for all companies hiring employees. Different payment methods may apply ...


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This is definitely a scam, and it's a variation of the 'money mule scam' scam, where they send you a check, asking you to deposit it and then send a portion back to them or on to one or more others. You could VERY easily find yourself in deep legal hot water if what you're being asked to do is interpreted as money laundering, and almost certainly that's what ...


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Never transfer money 'on behalf of' someone else. Never personally register for something that requires you to perform cash transactions in your own name, on behalf of your company. [I've edited to remove a suggestion that you try and get paid - you've been there a day, better to just call this a loss and move on] Changing payment terms like this is common ...


2

To answer the question as posed: There is a trade-off where more stringent policies will cause people to use the services of the bank less, resulting in lower profits for the bank. Why else should credit card security remain so laughably bad, where you basically give a third party all the information necessary to withdraw as much money as they want from your ...


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I asked for the account number or name of the entity on that account, and they refused to give me that information. If the transfer was made directly from the card to the destination account, then the destination account should be on the transaction record for the card. Asking the bank for this is suspicious. The account owner would have that information ...


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Short answer is, ANY asset can be used as collateral - you simply have to find someone who's willing to accept it as such. Since you didn't indicate how much of a loan you want relative to the lot's value, I'll assume you want up to the land's appraised value. A good source for loans like that would be your local credit union. They have pretty flexible ...


113

As well as the privacy reasons cited in the other answer, and the inability of the banks to conduct their own criminal investigation, there is another very important reason why the banks will not share their investigation with you. The most common kind of fraud is first party fraud.1 This is the kind of fraud where you get your girlfriend to transfer money ...


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I understand your frustration at feeling as though banks may not care about fraud, but they do. You have to realize though that there are limits to what they can do. It is up to the police or other authorities to pursue criminal investigations, and to the extent the local laws allow it (in most jurisdictions even the police need warrants or court orders to ...


2

In many countries there are companies that verge on the edge of being a bank, even though many people don't realize it. Casinos. They move massive amounts of money. Automobile companies. Their financing arm handles many loans The company that finances all those new smart phones that people pay for over 30 months. Companies that finance the purchases of ...


1

Yes, of course. What you describe seems like a text-book case of why banks have “dispute a charge” features. Here in the UK, that shouldn't be necessary… you wouldn't need half those details to win the legal argument. Yet, however clearly you're going to win if you take the restaurant to court to get your refund, your bank's “dispute a charge” service will ...


1

Dispute it is the right answer, because if the merchant does/did actually process the refund, the onus will be on them to prove that they did. Provide your receipt as evidence to the issuing financial institution of the card. They have people that specialize in recovering funds from merchants. They will know exactly how to argue with the merchant on your ...


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I now realize the manager's refund to my card was completely fake: it says the refund total on a line saying "CASH: amount", no credit card line is listed. In addition to what others have already said, this is potentially an embezzlement scheme. The (ostensible) manager enters a cash refund in the register, but instead of giving you the cash, puts ...


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You didn't specify the country, so your mileage might vary. Every time I opened a dispute through a Russian bank, the first thing the bank always did was contact the vendor and ask for their version of the story. The bank person would see all your transaction history with that vendor. If the vendor did issue the refund, they would tell the bank so, the bank ...


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Is this an appropriate situation in which to use my credit card's "dispute charge" feature? Or is that a misuse of this feature? Yes, this is a legitimate use of this feature. Call your bank and ask to be connected to the dispute department. Explain your story and they will gladly guide you on how to best proceed. They might very well say "Oh ...


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Yes, dispute the charge. A dispute usually is open by the credit card for a period such as 30 days; if the refund is processed within that period, the dispute is moot and you are made whole. If the credit doesn't appear in 30 days it will come down to the credit card policy which side to take; you have documentation showing the business' intent and from the ...


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tl;dr: Based on your recent update that the receipt says cash refund, which you didn't receive, if it were me, I'd just dispute it now and be done with it. Note: The previous version of this answer is based on the refund being issued to a credit card, which no longer applies to this specific question. I'm leaving it for future readers that may be interested ...


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First, make sure you've got something in writing that your landlord has received rent. Second, put something in writing to the bank seeking an explanation why your account was not debited the amount in question. Third, wait for written acknowledgement from your bank before letting your balance dip below the amount in question. Fourth, if unsatisfied by ...


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The interest rates between bank have typically small differences, and the main trigger is the relative need of the bank for more cash. If a bank would like to have more cash, they raise the interest rate; if they have too much, they lower it. Usually, those differences are small in absolute amounts; just because they currently are all near zero makes the ...


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