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Without a location tag, I'm going to assume the United States. According to Section 3-401(b) of the Uniform Commercial Code (my emphasis): A signature may be made (i) manually or by means of a device or machine, and (ii) by the use of any name, including a trade or assumed name, or by a word, mark, or symbol executed or adopted by a person with present ...


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Multiple people have brought up the idea that you run the risk of brushing up against laws regarding tax evasion, and money laundering. It's important to make sure you avoid these risks. Here are some ideas: Regarding tax evasion, realize that the gift is not tax deductible, even if you were to run the payment through a non-profit intermediary such as the ...


4

To actually answer your question: The most straightforward answer has already been posted by @StephenG - get a lawyer. It's probably cheaper in the long run and certainly much quicker and easier. Lawyers do this kind of thing all the time for all sorts of reasons - trust disbursements, will benefits, insurance payouts, property dividends, and so on, with a ...


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You realize BOTH the "friend" and yourself will go down for all of money laundering tax evasion anything else they can think up? It's hard to come up with a jurisdiction where money laundering is more closely followed, than Australia.


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Use a Lawyer To ensure the legality and anonymity of such a transaction you should be able to use a lawyer as an intermediary without revealing your identity to the friend. Contact a lawyer and ask them if they can act as an intermediary to allow you to gift funds to your friend without informing the friend of the identity of the donor. A lawyer should be ...


2

The short answer is that it is not right that money can flow anonymously. If that is possible, that all the terrorist group will have an easy time collecting donations without traces. My friend worked in a bank in Singapore, and someone approach them with cash to be deposited as a new account. Then after some questioning into the origin of the cash, the ...


4

Have you considered the gift of cash? Four hundred and ten $100 notes delivered by courier (or friend unknown to the recipient). That could be as simple as half kilo package. Withdrawing or depositing will flag you and your friend under money laundering/ terrorism funding and it may take a while to process, but it's possible. Alternately, you could give your ...


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Frame Challenge (idk if that's a thing in this SE, but I think it should be in this case) You're concerned your friend won't accept the money if he knows it is from you, how do you know he'll accept it from anyone else? You're at least his friend after all. I think the only real answer is convince your friend to accept the money from you, or don't gift it. ...


0

One way to do this is through your local church. It might be a bit problematic if you and your friend do not attend church but that is a common way to do it here in the US. If it was me, that is how I would do it (and have done so in the past) with perhaps giving some to the pastor for his time and trouble. For a gift this size, and the potential hassle ...


1

To my knowledge, when trading over eToro you are not buying actual shares but CFDs (contract for difference, a derivative). This adds counterparty risk: if eToro (or another party actually selling the CFDs) defaults you will have to wait for liquidation and will only get a small fraction of your money back. In contrast, if you buy actual shares or fund units,...


4

Illiquid assets of all kinds can be vulnerable in bankruptcy. Partners in a small business would be well-advised to cover this possibility by agreeing beforehand to terms regarding buying/selling their business interests in the event of a personal bankruptcy.


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