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Some option strategies have practical names based on the relationship of the respective options. For example, vertical, diagonal, horizontal/calendar, box, and ratio spread, as well as straddle, collar/fence. Others are based on the appearance of the risk graph. For example, butterfly, condor, Christmas tree spread. Others are just whimsical in nature ...


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I don't know how definitive it is, but Wikipedia has an answer: The word iron in the name of this position indicates that, like an iron butterfly, this position is constructed using both calls and puts, by combining a bull put spread with a bear call spread. The combination of these two credit spreads makes the long iron condor (and the long iron butterfly) ...


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It is unusual for Canadian mortgages to have the same term and amortization. It's typical to have a 5 year term and a 25 year amortization, for example. But rather than guessing what the term is (such as thinking, "it's probably the same as the amortization"), the correct thing to do is ask (or look at the offer.) The interest rate will depend on ...


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Per mhoran_psprep and Fattie in the comments, it means Trade Type. I'd like to offer some more evidence that it is (as the asker, Flux, suggested) a translation error. If you go to the Bonds side of the site (e.g. to https://live.euronext.com/en/product/bonds/FR0013233384-XPAR/market-information) you'll find that the Trading Type is properly translated. To ...


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