New answers tagged

1

Here's a few off the top of my head: Clearance sale (old models, excess stock etc.) Salvage sale (for damaged, excess or used goods) Stocktake sale (typically done shortly before the end of a fiscal year, to simplify the stocktake) Runout sale (typical for cars, with updated models/manufacturing year arriving) Liquidation sale (company is short of cash ...


2

Yes, it refers to a put option. It is like buying an ordinary put on a bond, giving you (the investor) the right to sell at a fixed price (here, face value) by a given date (here, maturity). Bonus fact: A callable bond, similarly, is one for which the investor has effectively written a call option, giving the borrower the right to buy back the bond at a ...


1

Why "receivable"? If a debtor is still alive and solvent, technically any debt is "receivable". Thus "receivable" looks meaningless. "unreceived" is clearer. You are right, all debts that are reasonably expected to be collected are receivable. Charged off or noncollectable debts go somewhere else in the accounting. Why "accounts"? Why not "money" or ...


2

Companies keep track of multiple types of accounts in their relations with other entities. Companies keep accounts for all of their vendors that they buy supplies and services from. These accounts are the amounts that the company owes to their vendors. They are called accounts payable, because the company must eventually pay these amounts. Likewise, ...


2

The ratio tells you the multiple of a company’s interest expenses that they are earning. If the company’s annual interest expense is $100k, and they have earnings of $1 million, then they have earned 10 times their interest expense. The times interest earned ratio is 10. Yes, the name is a little awkward, which is why this ratio is also called the ...


5

According to A Model for the Federal Funds Rate Target at page 13 changes as small as 6.25 basis points were sometimes observed prior to 1990 Similarly, according to The Relationship Between the Federal Funds Rate and the Fed's Federal Funds Rate Target: Is It Open Market or Open Mouth Operations? at page 4: In late 1989 the Fed began the practice ...


-6

If Fed is really using statistical techniques, then it is impossible to come at an answer in multiple of 25 points unless they are targeting an objective, else they are using guess work and using tradition as the excuse. OLD quarter point system, could benefit the ultra rich, they should use the decimal points increase similar to stock market. Doctors ...


7

I'm pretty sure it's just a policy that the Fed seems to follow. I know of no mechanical reason why they couldn't use more precise increments, but possibly for simplicity (or tradition) they choose to use more granular rates than other countries seem to. Keep in mind that influencing interest rates is an inexact science. The Fed will set rates at a certain ...


0

As pointed out by the wikipedia page on Redemption movement, the promoter is selling phoney bills of exchange to the victims. It is considered fraudulent scheme because those phoney bills of exchange have no legal binding on representation. You can imagine the con-artist faking their roles as representative of an organisation/boy that they do not belong ...


6

I believe that “redemption schemes” refers to a conspiracy theory-based scam based on the idea that you can redeem your birth certificate for money. We had a question about it earlier this year. You can read more about the ridiculous idea on the Skeptoid Blog, or even more details on Wikipedia. More generally, there are scams where the crook claims that ...


0

Redemption scam is when someone is accepting goods deemed for redemptions at certain price point with knowledge they were purchased in place with different redemption price. In tv sitcom "Seinfield" there is an example of it. Moving bottles from New York to Michigan where the redemption price is higher.


Top 50 recent answers are included