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4

Strictly-speaking, no, you don’t need a brokerage account to trade ETFs. If you are determined to avoid brokers, you can, but it’s usually not worth the trouble to do that. ETFs are Exchange Traded Funds, so using a broker is the primary way to trade them. Your alternatives to using a broker are to either find someone who wants to sell the ETF you’re ...


1

Open an account with one of the brokers listed at https://monevator.com/compare-uk-cheapest-online-brokers/ . They all have slightly different charging structures, and some may be better for a purely ETF portfolio than others. If you're UK tax resident, you almost certainly want to open an ISA account rather than a regular trading account. You can ...


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yes you can do this easily by setting up a brokerage account. Check out fidelity.com; It's free, it's simple to use, and most of all you can invest in stocks, call options, shorts, use margin, etc. Google "brokerage" firms- find one in your area and check out its competitors on Google Finance- and see what they offer you as a customer in the U.K. Check out ...


5

The S&P 500 constituents are rebalanced on a quarterly basis on the third Friday of March, June, September and December on the basis of their weighting and other relevant factors. Intra-quarter changes can also occur, typically because a company becomes ineligible to remain in the index, such as takeover/merger, removal from major exchanges due to ...


2

The index rebalances quarterly. Different fund providers have different approaches to the rebalance. Some might try to rebalance a little ahead of the index. Others may try to track as closely as possible. The above is for educational purposes only. It is not investment advice or a recommendation to buy or sell securities.


1

It's extremely likely that fund managers don't take any money from currency exchange. Currency fluctuations, though, are impossible to predict, so you don't quite know how much money you're getting back out. If your investment goes up 10% while the pound sterling loses 10% vs the dollar you're still about even. If your investment goes up 10% while the ...


2

The SGBS (USD denominated) product is there to appeal to large institutional investors who keep large amounts on USD at hand and wish to trade gold. (Private, retail investors with USD in their account may also choose SGBS). The SGBX (GBP denominated) product is there to appeal to mainly private, retail investors in the UK who wish to trade gold but do not ...


2

It's dead simple, since you are starting with pounds, just get the pound one. At the end, you can just take pounds out. If you went with the USD one, you'd have to "change twice". Thus, they're simply offering the pound one as a "convenience to you" - so to speak. (Note that inside their enterprise, they essentially "change on every transaction" in some ...


2

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/f/fund.asp A fund is a pool of money that is allocated for a specific purpose. A fund can be established for any purpose whatsoever, whether it is a city government setting aside money to build a new civic center, a college setting aside money to award a scholarship, or an insurance company setting aside money to pay its ...


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The currently accepted answer is incorrect. Vanguard is quoting the 1-year return as of 9/30/2019. This is calculated from the close of 9/28/2018 (the last trading day of September 2018) to the close of 9/30/2019. It is important to get the exact dates right because stock indices can easily rise or fall 1% or more in a day. Stock price fluctuations are ...


9

Google's numbers: 10/01/18 $268.04 09/27/19 $271.26 That's a gain of 1.20% which is far less than the actual return because Google did not account for dividends. During that period you would have received $5.43 in dividends so the Total Return with dividends reinvested would have been 3.34%. You can verify these numbers with a DRIP calculator or with ...


-1

You're comparing two different data points. The Vanguard page you linked lists 4.25% as the 1-year return in a table under the following heading: Average annual returns—updated monthly This means that the average of the returns of 1-year periods during the life of the fund are 4.25%. Google lists the price 1 year ago as 268, and today as 271, ...


0

I agree with what @D Stanley has already said. But would like to add a few points. 1) If you're just looking to add some bonds to your portfolio to balance out the risk Vangaurd does a total bond market fund that has a low MER VBMFX (MER 0.15%). 2) Deciding how much risk/reward you're willing to take on is a personal choice but will be informed by your ...


4

Is there any ETF / Index Fund that tracks the S&P 500 and that holds both stocks and bonds? No, because the S&P 500 does not contain any bonds, so trying to track that index with both stocks and bonds would be extremely difficult. I assume you want the returns of the S&P 500 but not the risk, hence the addition of bonds. Unfortunately, risk ...


4

Read JL Collins stock series. Part 10 provides a good explanation of why a large regulated brokerage that tracks an index can't crash. "1. You are not investing in Vanguard, you are investing in one or more of the mutual funds it manages. The Vanguard mutual funds are held as separate entities. Their assets are separate from Vanguard, they each carry ...


2

If something happens to the mutual fund and it crashes, you lose everything. Nothing will happen to the mutual fund that doesn't also happen to the underlying index. What might happen is that the brokerage goes bankrupt or collapses due to some malfeasance. The SIPC should pick up the pieces after you, but that will take time. Better to just invest with ...


3

If something happens to the mutual fund and it crashes, you lose everything. Theoretically, yes, but the point of diversification is that the odds of ALL of the underlying stocks going to zero is infinitesimal. Certainly there can be large economy-wide crashes, which is why you can further diversify into multiple mutual funds covering different markets (...


1

The simplistic answer is that Ex Dates and Payment/Payable Dates serve different purposes, so there is no intrinsic reason why they should be the same. Ex Dates are administrative - they serve to indicate whether someone is entitled to the upcoming dividends. Once the company sets the record date, the ex-dividend date is set based on stock exchange rules....


0

Summarizing some lengthy comments in a vague answer: I have not found any published explanation of their ex-dividend period choice, so it would probably take an insider to explain that strategy The impact of a "longer" ex-dividend period to you is minimal - just the time value of the dividend itself. The dividend is a wash from a value standpoint (the value ...


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