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In addition to Rate of Return, I would also recommended to compare volatility (risk). For example if you compare ETFs TQQQ and QQQ for the year 2019, you'll see that TQQQ performed considerably better. However if you look at 2020 you will see that there are risks inherent in TQQQ structure (all investments come with risks, and this is not a recommendation ...


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Annualized Rate Of Return is the most common metric for measuring portfolio performance. To calculate that for your portfolio (with no cash in/out-flows), divide the current balance by the initial balance, then take that to the 1/n power, where n is the age of the portfolio in years (e.g. 1.5 for 18 months). Note that this only works because there hasn't ...


2

Regardless of which broker you choose, you will have access to UCITS ETFs, many of which follow international indices. However, you cannot buy funds that are domiciled outside of the EU, at least not as a private investor. The website https://justetf.com has a database of ETFs and automatically applies availability restrictions based on country, and often ...


1

An actual conversion to a different holding would not be a taxable event. For example VFIAX to VOO, if converted by the fund provider. (I'm using Vanguard funds as an example both because one appeared in the question and because they are somewhat unique in making ETFs a share class of their mutual fund. They specifically support this non-taxable ...


4

Generally, if you sell an asset in a non-tax-sheltered account for more than you paid for it, that's a capital gain, and you have to pay capital gains tax. There are exceptions, but I don't believe any exceptions apply here. The wash sale rule says that if you sell a security at a loss and buy a "substantially identical" security shortly before or after, ...


3

So, can I sell my SPY and then buy the equivalent VOO? Absolutely - nothing prevents you from doing so. And if you have a gain then wash sale rules are irrelevant. You would then owe capital gains tax on the gain in value. But the cost basis for VOO would be higher, so your gains on that fund would be lower. So your choice is to pay, say $1,000 in tax now (...


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are these holdings due to ETFs or instead "private" investments of public companies (money from Vanguard that do not belong to Mutual Funds/ETFs)? ETFs and mutual funds would be a large part of this, but they're not the only "institutional investors". Pension funds and endowments would be other examples. Basically anything other than individual investors. ...


1

When you are buying CSPX, which uses USD as Base Currency, the FX issue comes in two forms: One-time transaction fee. Exchange rate change over a period of time. The first part, one-time transaction fee, is dependent on whether the conversion is performed by your own Bank, or by a Market Maker that aims to maintain no-arbitrage condition between CSPXN.MX, ...


18

The unit is arbitrary. It doesn't mean anything. I buy these special paint can liners. Some stores sell 4 for $4.00, others sell 5 for $5.00 and others sell 6 for $6.00. It's exactly the same thing as that. In any of the funds, your $1.00 buys, say, 0.0000316 shares of GE stock, as well as 499 other stocks in principle totaling up to $1.00 value. Just ...


35

The ETFs are designed to replicate the return. Don't get hung up on the price. Illustrative Example: Say you have two ETFs both designed to replicate the return of an index. Call these ETFs A and B. Whether you buy 1 share of ETF A for $100 or 2 shares of ETF B for $50, you have invested $100. Each ETF manager will take your money along with the ...


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If you already have the necessary knowledge to create and rebalance over time a portfolio that is appropriate for you and your financial goals, then you shouldn't pay anyone for such advice. In this case you could (A) just get a Vanguard, or the like, target retirement date fund. (B) do it all yourself with ETFs or mutual funds or whatever else you ...


4

Yes - "Buy low, sell high" would apply to Acorn similarly to any other brokerage account. Acorn is just a simple investing account where you can buy a limited number of Vanguard's low cost ETFs. The Vanguard ETFs typically are index funds which track a given market index like the S&P 500. The market's indexes are currently lower as you alluded to in ...


5

Read the prospectus. It will give information about this scenario. For example, in the prospectus for VOO it says The Fund reserves the right to substitute a different index for the index it currently tracks if the current index is discontinued, if the Fund‘s agreement with the sponsor of its target index is terminated, or for any other reason ...


1

First, nothing. The index content doesn't change so much every day, so the ETF still represents about the correct mix, for weeks if not months to come. Any further action depends on the company that offers it: If the IP of the index is free, they could just grab it, and run it from now on. they can offer all owners of shares to transfer the shares to a ...


3

Inverse ETFs short can short stocks as well as utilize options and other derivatives, swap agreements, and/or futures contracts. Italy's three month ban of short selling applies to stocks. If it's no more than that, the ETF may be able to continue doing business as usual, depending on the MO of their prospectus. When the US banned the shorting of 100 or ...


5

I cannot provide any sources and am just guessing. The ETF you talk about is located in Ireland. That has two effects: If you would sort it, the Italian regulation seems only to affect Italian stocks. But you don't short it, but hold it as a long position. So you are not affected. Is the ETF affected? Maybe - once short selling is banned in Ireland as ...


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In the US we have SIPC insurance which covers the custodial function of a brokerage firm as well as as protection against unauthorized trading or account theft. It provides up to $500,000 in total coverage per customer for lost or missing assets of cash and/or securities. It covers up to $250k of cash. Securities can be transferred from broker to ...


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You make money from growth ETF funds in exactly the same way you make money from any other investments: You buy 'em. You hold 'em. You sell 'em.


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very simply, by selling some shares. for example, you buy 1000 Google shares at 100$ per share; after ten years, they are at 200 $ each, and you sell 100 shares to liquidate 20000 $. In the bigger picture, there is little difference between (good) Value and Growth investments - only the timing and control of the payouts, and the tax consequences.


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If you're 25 years from retirement, you don't want income from your investments**, you want the value of your investments to grow. When you're getting ready to retire, you'll want to convert some or all of those growth investments into investments that do generate income, because you won't have income from your job any more. ** It's OK if they do pay ...


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Since you are asking a lot of questions at once, this answer is a non-exhaustive list of options to consider: Setup an emergency fund first. A usual recommendation runs at 3-9 x your monthly salary. Due to the german social safety net, this multipler can be lower, but as you are a foreign national(?), you might rather err on the higher side. Deal with any ...


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