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As indicated in comments, this is common practice in the US as well as EU. For example, in this Fox Business article, a user had basically the same experience: their card was replaced but without the specific merchant being disclosed. When the reporter contacted Visa, they were told: "We also believe that the public interest is best served by quickly ...


52

You can simply use them to pay in a supermarket or anywhere else. Just give them the card and say ‘put 1.23$ on this one please, and the rest I pay cash‘ or whatever. They might be annoyed when you have really many, but you can use up one every time you shop easily. For some cards, you do not even have to know the remaining amount, just say use it up. Note ...


30

I had a good half dozen of these with various amounts, none of them quite enough to make a purchase anywhere and, like you, I didn't want them to go to waste. If there is at least $1 on the card, you can use it to buy Amazon eGift cards, which is what I did. It's not as nice having actual cash, but for me it was the next best thing. You can also use them ...


18

Short answer: call your bank and set up a pin. Long answer: Europe uses the chip-and-pin system. It is kind of like the new chip-based USA debit card system. In order to use European point-of-sale systems, you need to have a chip-and-pin enabled credit card, and you need to set up a pin with your card-issuing bank (just like you set up a pin with your ...


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Facebook may sue you or your company for not paying the bill for the ads that Facebook ran for you or your company. There is a chance they may ban you and/or your company in addition to that to get the money as there was likely an agreement you accepted to put ads on Facebook.


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I can't say for any country, but at least for several banks in Russia, the difference is how transactions are processed if they are nominated in different currency than the card [and both are different from the local currency of your bank's country]. E.g. when you pay for something in GBP (and the shop charges in GBP), while your card is in CHF. For ...


11

If your bank says 'yes' you are set. If not, a suggestion - Ask if the store offers "lawaway." This means that you put a deposit to hold the item, and make small payments until it's paid in full. You can charge the $2000, pay the card immediately, and do this say, once a week, until you've paid the full amount. If the store wants to make the sale, this ...


10

Is there a reason that you only want to do the transaction with the credit card? A certified check or even a personal check (perhaps with a waiting period for it to clear) may be acceptable to the store. You should ask and make arrangements in advance. The store should be willing to discuss the payment methods in advance for such a sale. Maybe they even ...


8

The short answer is that it probably doesn't matter if you select Visa or MasterCard. Both offer contactless payments (and in Europe, too) and are widely accepted. The longer answer is that Visa and MasterCard are separate payment networks. While most merchants that accept one will accept both, that is not always the case, and there are some differences, ...


8

PC MasterCard recently added this as a new feature to their online system. It lets you see "Pending Authorizations" for your card when you log in. Their email said: Along with your purchases, you'll see a list of every transaction that's been approved, but not yet applied to your balance. You'll be able to identify these with the word “Pending” in the ...


8

I found a german article describing the legal situation in Germany. To summarize The "Bundesdatenschutzgesetz (BDSG) § 42a Informationspflicht bei unrechtmäßiger Kenntniserlangung von Daten" Roughly Privacy Act: Obligation to inform on illegal obtainment of information governs this situation. Credit card information is explicitly included in the law (§ 42a ...


7

Mastercard and Visa are networks, your issuer is a bank who is participating in the network. It is definitely advisable to have a couple of cards from different issuers, but having different networks is not as critical. The reason I think it is useful to have cards from different issuers is that if a system of one issuer is down - you don't get stuck ...


7

My guess would be that they sell your debt to a collection agency and don't really bother with pressing charges for 500 dollars. A collection agency can do multiple things to hold you accountable for your debt. I hate to bring it to you but it only makes sense that you should try to resolve this debt given that "not being careful enough" is not facebook's ...


7

Your only recourse is to attempt to cancel the tickets through mytrip.com, and if they do not cancel the tickets, you can initiate a charge-back on your card on the grounds that they did not disclose the full price of the ticket before you initiated checkout and they did not allow you to cancel the transaction after they did disclose the price of the tickets....


7

Others have already commented on the impact of anything which dissuades merchants from raising possible breaches, so I won't dwell on that. Maybe we need stronger legislation, maybe we don't, but it doesn't change today's answer. Often it works the other way around to what you might expect - rather than the merchant noticing and notifying Visa/MC/others, ...


6

In Hong Kong, usually you can "prepay" your credit card. Just make a payment in advance and the amount will added to your credit limit after about 2 working days. (Call the card centre if you want the limit to be raised immediately.) This is how college students here (including myself) settled their HK$20,000+ tuition fee with a credit card and get reward.


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Disclaimer: Answer based on a comment conversation In the context of consulting firms, non-solicitation clauses and MOUs are generally done to protect the firms' assets (read: its workers), and are in place to prevent clients from poaching workers from the consulting firms. They do not prohibit a client from seeking the services of a competitor. Since that'...


5

From a technical POV, there are two main versions of contactless payment cards - For MasterCard there is PayPass M/Chip and PayPass MagStripe. I believe the Mag Stripe version may just be used in the US, where there are fewer chip cards, while M/Chip is used on cards which have EMV chips. (ref) I believe the current versions of PayPass M/Chip do perform ...


5

They're not. Basically, other than the data being transmitted using the RFID chip, the protection is exactly the same as the one you have on your magnetic strip: NONE. But, you tagged this as "chip-card". Don't confuse, a chip-card is something different. Chip-cards are used in Europe and in many other places where privacy and security are of a concern for ...


5

Keep in mind that the average cashier may not know the regulation. If it is misspelled and they notice it, they could reject the card when they compare the ID. The question is how often do they check ID's? Answer: not very often. Also remember that the most online forms ask for the name on the card. So which name are you supposed to enter: the correct ...


5

It is not true. They don't chose rates, the rates are dependent on the contracts between the Visa/Mastercard and the members (banks issuing and clearing the cards and transactions). There may in fact be two conversions: one is from the original currency to USD/EUR, and the other from the USD/EUR to the target (your home) currency. If your home currency is ...


5

Embossed vs. printed Embossed credit cards are credit cards that have raised numbers. The purpose of the raised numbers is to allow the card to be used with carbon papers in a "zip-zap" offline machine. Printed cards without the raised numbers cannot be used with this machine. Functionally, this is the only difference between the two types of cards. Until ...


5

Spend them at the gas pump. Just run the pump until it stops, then repeat with next card. That's always worked for me


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In general, payments will be in the currency denominated by the seller. Your bank will automatically convert a balance of INR from your card to whichever currency you chose to pay in (be it USD or EUR) based on the bank's current exchange rate of that currency pair and some currency exchange fees will be charged on top. Fees involved is something only your ...


4

It depends on your card issuer. With American Express (UK), I've had no problems overpaying, then putting through a charge for positive balance + most of credit limit. I actually rang them up to ask the first time I wanted to do this, and they confirmed it was fine, but warned me that their website would only report an "available credit" of the credit limit,...


4

Disclaimer: the only cards I have are Visas. When I have tried this for buying expensive items like plane tickets, this was not allowed. (I really wanted to take advantage of the extra rewards for so much more spending!) Also, sometimes when I have tried to overpay, the various banks will not take more than an outstanding balance. What I mean is say I owed ...


4

3 month euribor is .201% today. So, 8.7% for Finland Mastercard. Card issuers' rates vary, and I've seen rates in the US from 8 or 9% right up to 24%, similar to the range you show. If you plan to pay in full each month, I'd take the longer grace period regardless of rate. I can honestly say I don't know the rate on my card. I pay in full every month, ...


4

It's not so much a credit card, but a financial institution's online platform that either provides this functionality or not. The following Canadian financial institutions show an itemized list of pre-authorized transactions (not an exhaustive list): RBC Online Banking (both personal and business). PC Financial. The following institutions show a total ...


4

If I lose the card and the person found it can easily make a transaction. Yes The online merchants can fraudulently use my card information. Yes Is it normal for online transactions? Yes, in most of the Western world it works as you described for France. What if I lose the card? Does this mean someone who get it can constantly make purchases ...


4

The equivalent MasterCard benefit is called "purchase assistance" and is described on this page: Purchase assurance Provides coverage for most items you purchase with your eligible MasterCard if the item is damaged or stolen within 90 days of the date of purchase. However, with any of these credit card benefits, individual card issuing institutions ...


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