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241

Absolute scam. Any time anyone asks you to open a bank account so they can send you money and then you have to send some portion of it back to them, it's a guarantee that it's a scam. What happens is that your dad will deposit the check and transfer it to this woman, then the check will bounce (or turn out to be fake altogether) and your dad will be on the ...


235

This is a very trivial scam. Flow is like this: Send money to Mr. X (you, in this case). Call Mr. X and ask for the money back, because mistake. Usually they ask for a wire transfer/cash/gift cards/prepaid cards or something else irreversible/untraceable. Mr. X initiates transfer back to Scammer. Accept the transfer from Mr. X Dispute the original transfer ...


179

This is almost certainly a scam or a mistake. This is not good, spendable money: it is not yours to keep. Very simple to handle. Tell the bank, in writing that you were not expecting to receive this money and are a bit surprised to receive it. Preferably in a way that creates a paper trail. And then stop talking. Why? Because you honestly don't know. ...


146

It’s possible your card was skimmed. This works by the scammer getting a physical swipe of your card, for example from a bogus attachment to a legitimate card reader, then making a duplicate card. That duplicate card can then be sent anywhere, resulting in your card seemingly having been ‘scanned at a distance’. Contact your bank and ask them to block your ...


140

Absolutely a scam 100% chance. This is one of the most common scams out there. Here's how you will get ripped off. They send you a check which will deposit in your account Seeing the deposit went through everything looks peachy, you buy and transmit bitcoins. The check bounces in a few weeks and you are out the money or owe the bank if that gives you a ...


137

It is not always easy to tell how a given scam will end up making money for the scammer. This is due to a lot of things, such as intricacies of paper trails, or story details that get passed on / omitted (ie: perhaps your mother's friend wanted the money deposited in a weird way that allows the scam to occur, or it was in a particular jurisdiction that made ...


105

He COULD use the signature to forge her name on a check or a contract. Of course that would be wildly illegal. Just because she gave him the signature voluntarily (under false pretenses) doesn't mean he's authorized to sign anything in her name. At a minimum, you should watch your bank statements and get copies of your credit report for the next few months....


103

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before signing the lease ...


102

The other answers describe why this is highly likely to be a scam. This answer describes why you don't want to get involved, even in the unlikely case that it isn't a scam. I'm describing this using US law (which I'm not particularly familiar with, so if I go astray I'd suggest others fix any flaws in this answer), but most other countries have similar ...


100

When this happens, your bank should give you your money back. Your bank will then recover the money from the bank that accepted the check, and that bank will then attempt to recover the money from whoever gave them the check. You have found yourself on the other end of the usual counterfeit check scam. In this case, the counterfeit check that they gave to ...


99

Yes, it is a scam. Think about it: Why would a stranger offer to give you money? Why would she need you to pay her own employees? She wouldn't. It is a scam. You have more to lose than just the $25 that is in the account. Just as has happened to your dad before, you will be receiving money that is not real, but paying real money out somewhere else. One ...


97

It looks like "shipment scam" mixed with "bait and switch". There are few ways you can get robbed: So the "DHL" (not really) will say they have cash for you but they need to be paid for handling (or something like that). you pay the guy his fee, get cash and realize they're fake. You lost fee and stuff the "DHL" will contact you and tell you that you need ...


93

An uncle of mine fell for a variant of that scam last April. This is what happened in his case: He had a 2nd hand Apple laptop for sale for 250 Euro and advertised it on Marktplaats (the Dutch equivalent to Craigslist). Was promised a DHL swap. Envelope with the cash in exchange for the laptop. (He wasn't aware DHL doesn't do that sort of thing.) A ...


80

A similar one that happened to me was someone offering to pay a $38K loan debt to me by quit-claiming a shared property deed we had (different transaction). So he was "giving" me his half of the property, worth at that time about $40K, for that $38k debt. About 2 years later when I went to sell that property, I discovered he had a $50k IRS tax lien against ...


79

I would respond to your friend this way: "Either you are planning to do something illegal, in which case I don't want to be involved, or you are planning to do something legal, in which case you don't need me." Here's Why: What your friend proposes is completely pointless because if the money is legally his to give to you, then it's perfectly legal for your ...


78

The way credit and debit cards work in the US, all liability for unauthorized purchases is on the card issuer and/or merchant, not on the cardholder. Customers have no reason to want measures that increase evidence (and perceived certainty) that they authorized a purchase, and every reason not to want it. The same applies to "Verified by Visa" and similar ...


78

If you didn't order it, it's free Ohio -- like most states, the US Federal government and the UK -- has a law like this one: Ohio Revised Code 1333.60 Voluntary delivery of unordered goods constitutes unconditional gift. Where any merchandise is offered for sale by means of its voluntary delivery to an offeree who has neither ordered nor requested ...


76

If they have no idea what you are talking about, you could ask whether the dealership will send you a letter saying you do not currently owe them anything, nor have they charged off anything you owed. This separates trying to figure out exactly how the letter arose from confirming that its claim is not valid. But your description raises many questions. Are ...


74

Don't do it. If it's not the classic scam described in Daniel Anderson's answer, then it's probably money laundering. In that case, the woman would actually wire you money, which you have to wire to someone else she names. This is done to enter illegally gained money into the regular money circulation, hiding the trail. If this is the case, you would have ...


71

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before you sign the ...


70

Technically, no. There is very little security in the US for bank drafts. With your bank account routing number it is very easy for people to draw funds without your authorization. Another thing people can do is buy stuff online with "demand drafts". Essentially it works like a credit card number where the create an electronic version of a check to purchase ...


64

Yes, it’s a scam. There are red flags all over it. Ask yourself whether you really think a huge multinational like Nissan would work in this way.


58

With the standard "I am not a lawyer" disclaimer, consider this question: If you and your girlfriend split up sometime after purchasing the house but before getting married, would you expect her to repay you for the closing costs and downpayment? That is, if you write her a check for $5k, and 6 months after she signs the papers for the house one of you ...


55

I have some experience with this. I have had fraudulent charges appear on my credit card statement and had to change my card number several times, despite (I believe) no carelessness on my part. Every time that this has happened, I have never lost a penny due to fraud on my credit card. The bank has ultimately removed the fraudulent charges in every ...


53

This is clearly an identity theft fraud in stages. To be specific, this is called one-dollar scam. Even OP didn't provide further information to the said entity, some data is already leaked into the scammer's hand (Here show some of the major data breaches). To fix it : Call the credit card issuer now by using the hotline number printed on your credit ...


51

I would be very leery of a boutique firm that is cold calling you, is relatively new and is located in Hong Kong. Unless you live in Hong Kong and you know the local financial regulations, etc., what's your recourse if there are problems with this firm? I dealt with a number of such firms in the 1990's during the go-go days leading up to the the ...


50

I think the answer depends very much on where you are. I believe the other answer covers north america. On contrast, in (continental) Europe, giving the account and bank number (IBAN and BIC) is a (the most) common way to enable someone to send money to you. E.g. in Germany, you need much more than account number and bank number to withdraw money: To "...


50

Just browsed their website. Not a single name of anybody involved. Their application process isn't safe(No https usage while transferring private information). And considering they contacted you rather than you contacting them, I will be very wary about how they got my details. And they are located in Indonesia. And a simple google takes me to a BOILER ...


49

I contacted a lawyer, told to talk to Dept of Labor, DOL said they will not get involved that this is between my and my employer. Advise? What employer? You are 100% not employed by Nissan Motors....


48

Your MIL probably knows this, but all property should be purchased through a title agency with title insurance. As long as that process is followed, your MIL is protected. They title company may unearth some undisclosed property owners, or liens which could block the sale. However, they may not. In that case the title insurance protects the buyer. ...


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