61

PayPal has a couple of articles that discuss the dispute process. One is addressed to the buyer, and the other is addressed to the seller. The seller’s article is perhaps more informative: it discusses the process and the differences between a dispute, claim, chargeback, and bank reversal. From your question, it seems that you issued a dispute. After you ...


51

When you initiate a chargeback, the merchant has the right to dispute the chargeback. If they can provide proof that the purchase actually took place, the chargeback will fail. We don't know all the details of your situation, of course, but it appears from what you have said that the tax chain probably has documents that you signed agreeing to the charges. ...


33

Concealing parts of a document in order to obtain a signature is illegal. The company committed signature forgery because they effectively modified the document after you signed it (i.e. unfolded the parts that were previously folded). I suggest that you go to your local police department to file a report, citing "signature forgery". Once you have the police ...


21

+1 to @Ben Miller for explaining how to file a dispute with PayPal. Last year I ordered a FlashFish Power station. The price was suspiciously low but the web site appeared legitimate. They provided me with a USPS tracking number and every few days I received an E-mail update as to which city the package had passed through. Eventually I received a ...


20

So, what's the point of a charge-back, if they simply take the word of the merchant? tl;dr: They don't. As both a merchant and a consumer I have been on both ends of credit card chargebacks, and have received what I consider to be mostly fair outcomes in all cases. Here are some examples: A nightclub overcharged me by exactly $100 for a bar tab. I ...


17

Here's an excerpt from VISA's Card Acceptance Guidelines for Visa Merchants (PDF) Merchant Name The merchant name is the single most important factor in cardholder recognition of transactions. Therefore, it is critical that the merchant name, while reflecting the merchant’s “Doing Business As” (DBA) name, also be clearly identifiable to the ...


14

Stores are not required to give refunds. They do it as a gesture of good will toward their customers, and can refuse any return for any reason. That having been said, they did accept the jacket as a return. I'm assuming they gave you a "return receipt" that shows the item being returned and has a negative total. This is your proof that they accepted the ...


14

You have no legal basis to stop payment to the Credit Card Company, as even the court already clarified. I understand that for you the money you pay the credit card company is the same money you expect to not get back from the vendor, but legally it's not related. It would be the same as if you stopped paying rent - the landlord would have little ...


13

The point of a chargeback is to force merchants to do the paperwork. Many merchants don't, and are easy targets for chargebacks, even when they have, in fact, provided the good or service. You used a tax prep service. They may have given you poor (technical) advice, but such firms are usually very good about doing the paperwork. That's why you lost.


9

If this is a pre-authorized automatic billing, and if you have signed any contract with the merchant, cancelling may not block any future charges from the merchant. Happens with gyms, magazines, memberships quite often. There is a time period after the cancellation this will occur, then it'll be completely dead.


9

If the business is being investigated by your state's Attorney General's office, then your first call should be to that office. They will be able to help you in a few ways, even if they can't explicitly resolve the situation, and they also would undoubtedly appreciate your information to add to their case as well. First, they may be able to tell you how ...


9

Call Comcast during a non-peak time (first thing in the morning?), wait on hold, and politely explain what happened and request a $50 credit. Also politely request that your premium support request be handled for free given how much hassle you've had getting disconnected. They'll be able to tell your premium request was never answered because there are no ...


7

You may be using the wrong method to get your money back. As others have said, this is not a valid use for chargeback; that is when a fraudulent charge occurred, or when a merchant charges you incorrectly. However, many cards have various kinds of guarantees, one of which might cover this situation. Particularly in some european countries, such as the ...


7

If this chargeback failed then would it negatively affect my credit score? A credit score is a measure of how dependable of a borrower you are. Requesting a refund for not receiving goods not delivered as promised, whether it is successful or it fails, should not impact your credit score since it has no implications on the likelihood that you will pay back ...


7

I've tried to call my UK's bank to explain my situation, but as soon they've heard it's about a scam trading company, they say the chargeback doesn't apply for trading accounts according to their policy. The Bank is right. You willing and knowingly transferred the funds. So from Banks point of view, there was no breach of security leading to fraud. ...


6

Can? Yes. Legally/May? No. Charge back is when you indicate that the credit card charge itself is fraudulent. That could be a charge made by someone not authorized to use your credit card, or a vendor double charging you or charging you for an amount you did not agree to. It is not something you can do simply because you're unhappy with the goods or ...


6

I'm going to simplify your situation and restate it for clarity: I owe Citibank $10,000. A company owes me $2,000. If I tell Citibank I will not pay them the $10,000 until after I receive the $2,000 owed to me, will Citibank help me retrieve the $2,000? I believe when stated this way the answer is unfortunately, but clearly: No, it won't help at all. (...


5

Generally there's no ultimate protection against charge backs. Some methods are easier to charge back and some harder, and there's always the resort of going to courts. The hardest to contest is, of course, a cash payment or wire transfer. You need to remember that imposing unnecessary/unreasonable difficulties on your customers will drive business away. I ...


5

My question is, how can this happen? Humans are imperfect. They fat-finger things and write buggy code. They're defensive and lazy, too, not wanting to admit to mistakes. Computers just make mistakes faster. Is the malice of an involved party? Hanlon's razor: never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. Having said that... ...


4

If the gas station could provide four different signed slips (different mean different timestamps and sequence numbers and also different authorization numbers which match the ones in the transactions - for the automated machines where there's no signature but the card is present) - then the station could have proven that there were indeed four separate ...


4

If you have a good product, I wouldn't worry about it. You just have to accept some amount of chargebacks as the cost of doing business. Using a provider that offers buyer protection is likely to increase your overall sales, and this should more than compensate for the small percentage of users that unethically use the chargeback mechanism to avoid paying ...


4

For your particular case, you probably have a valid chargeback claim. Condition 12.5 Incorrect Amount can apply if: • The transaction amount is incorrect. • An addition or transposition error was made when calculating the transaction amount. • You altered the transaction amount after the transaction was completed without the consent of the cardholder. [...


3

If you're a cash-based taxpayer then you only recognize the income you've actually received. If you're accrual tax payer, then you recognize the income invoiced. How you deal with the missing $20, if you're accrual basis, depends on why they're missing. If they just decided to not pay it - then it's accounts receivable, until you either sue them to recover,...


3

Broadly, you can "dispute" the transaction with your card provider and ask for a chargeback. This isn't an automatic right of cancellation, but they will need to at least look at the dispute and respond. For example, in the circumstances you describe, you might claim that you never authorised the transaction, or that the vendor didn't provide the service you ...


3

You should contact the Company who purchased your visa balance and ask/write the following questions: Dispute the charge from Emusic.com as invalid. Instruct that no future charges will be accepted. How come Emusic.com was allowed to debit your account? When did they purchased your visa account? Ask for written verification that they purchased your ...


3

According to PayPal's external help page on account types, basic accounts can not accept credit cards; you need to upgrade at least to a Premier account to do so. Their help center gives both phone and e-mail contacts if you want to discuss this with someone who actually knows what they're talking about.


3

It is difficult to answer this question for your particular case as there are quite a few factors that can affect the answer, including how much time has elapsed since the charge was made and the company's policy regarding refunds. Even the number of other customers that are complaining and/or disputing charges can affect the outcome. In general, most ...


3

3rd parties can and do help people recover money lost to scam brokers. A retainer fee should be standard for these companies since any recovered funds in these cases always go directly to the purchaser and not to any 3rd party. These are tough cases, as banks will commonly not have trained their employees - even their "Dispute Experts" in this area of ...


3

If you book a flight with your credit card, and the airline goes bankrupt and you get no flight, that was an entirely legitimate transaction, and the credit card company will refund your money. The credit card company reimburses you if goods or services are not delivered. But in this case, you didn't pay for goods or services. You (believed that you) ...


3

You should have been prompted to select a reason; but perhaps a generic reason was attached to your dispute without your knowledge, such as that the product/service was not provided. Here is what it looks like from the merchant's side: They receive a dispute with a reason and are permitted to respond, e.g., as follows: Jenny Rosen purchased X from our ...


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