5

The government's own info on using Lifetime ISA funds to purchase your first home here, state that The home you buy must: - be in the UK - have a price of £450,000 or less - be the only home you will own - be where you intend to live - be purchased with a mortgage That first point appears to rule out what you want to do. So to use the Lifetime ISA funds ...


4

The reality is that, even if tax law allows them to hire you, the company can just decide not to hire you for the internship unless you do what they say. They may have their own reasons for not wanting to jump through the various hoops you are investigating, and for wanting to simplify their own bookkeeping by insisting that their interns be physically ...


3

I am sure there is plenty of detailed answers on this topic around here so this is the short version set some money aside for an emergency fund for unemployment, new car, etc. Depending on you life situation this is probably in the 5-15k range. This money needs to be liquid and risk-free. It's only purpose is to avoid going into debt if you need cash fast ...


2

You already know more about international tax and social security than I do. Your arguments sound plausible to me. But the company also has tax accountants and presumably know what they are doing. The only way I can see them being persuaded is to get a professional tax accountant to give them information. However let me give You some extra suggestions. Since ...


1

If you don't need to register for VAT, you don't need to put it in your invoice. It's normal for a business to be unprofitable at first if you have a good reason, e.g. if the quite expensive equipment can be used for more jobs to generate profit over time.


1

Credit scores are pretty meaningless. Each company that runs a credit check on you will have their own criteria and will make their own decision. The important thing is that the information in your credit file should be accurate. Given that it's the Equifax report that is incorrect, I'd start by getting a report directly from them to see if it gives any ...


1

Yes you can, provided that you have reported your losses to HMRC. Losses don't have to be reported immediately but must be claimed within 4 years of the end of the tax year in which the disposal occurred ('disposal' usually means sale, e.g. sale of shares). You would normally report losses and gains via a Self Assessment tax return. Technically, it doesn't ...


1

No. A product described as an Instant Cash ISA would have no provision for holding stocks/shares. But you are able to transfer the cash within an Instant Cash ISA to an account that does permit holding stocks/shares. If you do so, make sure you get the new account provider to do an ISA Transfer. Do not withdraw the cash from the ISA yourself, otherwise that ...


1

For many investments, including ISAs and pensions, it's possible to go straight to the fund managers and cut out the middle-man. The yearly fees on each fund will be higher as a retail invester, but you can offset against that not having to pay anything to the broker. Many ISAs (and pensions) will accept monthly payments.


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