57

Two options you can try: Go to the store and ask them to refund the difference. They might not, but it doesn't hurt to ask. Often stores will do this if you are within the return window because it saves them some hassle over you returning the used item and then buying a new item at the lower price. Buy the identical item again at the new price, then ...


30

If you're just planning to buy-and-hold, it is worth considering whether the value of the time you spend on searching for a cheap brokerage will not dwarf the savings. Around here (Denmark) banks don't generally seem to charge fees merely for holding stock for you. They charge a commission for each trade, some fractional percentage of the value which could ...


24

Depending on how you paid for the item, some credit cards have price protection insurance. There are always minimums (e.g. Must be more than 10% or €150 whichever is greater) and paperwork, and processing time, but it does not involve the retailer agreeing to your request.


20

You should dispute the transaction with the credit card. Describe the story and attach the cash payment receipt, and dispute it as a duplicate charge. There will be no impact on your score, but if you don't have the cash receipt or any other proof of the alternative payment - it's your word against the merchant, and he has proof that you actually used your ...


19

Summary When you invest in an S&P500 index fund that is priced in USD, the only major risk you bear is the risk associated with the equity that comprises the index, since both the equities and the index fund are priced in USD. The fund in your question, however, is priced in EUR. For a fund like this to match the performance of the S&P500, which is ...


19

Ultimately this is just bad luck. Prices change, especially for things like computers which become obsolete in a short time. At the end of the day a cutting edge PC is only cutting edge for about 6 months and will be old hat in 2 years, so there is bound to be some point where the price drops. After all, putting things on sale at the end of a season is ...


18

Short answer: call your bank and set up a pin. Long answer: Europe uses the chip-and-pin system. It is kind of like the new chip-based USA debit card system. In order to use European point-of-sale systems, you need to have a chip-and-pin enabled credit card, and you need to set up a pin with your card-issuing bank (just like you set up a pin with your ...


16

I'm almost in the same situation as you. Here is what I'm doing. Get enough cash on hand to handle every likely emergency. I hold 10.000€, which can keep me afloat for several months, with unemployment insurance well over a year. Buy ETFs each time you have above 3000€ saved up. I buy these: HSBC S+P 500 C.S.-MSCI PACIFIC UBS-ETF-MSCI EMERGING MARKETS ...


16

Most merchants (also in Europe) are reasonable, and typically are willing to work with you. credit card companies ask if you tried to work with the merchant first, so although they do not enforce it, it should be the first try. I recommend to give it a try and contact them first. If it doesn't work, you can always go to the credit card company and have the ...


14

First, save up at least 3000 EUR and put it into a Tagesgeld account. That's your emergency fund for when you need money quickly. Second, allow yourself some luxury. Have fun, do some travelling. You've earned it. Third, investing. There are many options and opinions, but I favor putting the same amount each month directly into stock index funds or ETFs with ...


12

There is no reason why that wouldn’t work, and there should be no additional cost just for living abroad. However, the bank may bill you more for actions that actually cost more, such as sending replacement cards to you. You should notify the bank of your new address soon, because if they find out that your old address is no longer valid (due to a returned ...


10

Here is a list of European ETFs you can buy in Europe: iShares Europe and DB x-Trackers. Both offer ETFs for Spanish citizens. Regarding your question in your comment on if you could buy Austrian ETFs as a Spanish citizen: If your broker offers Austrian ETFs you can buy them as well. I do not believe that there would be any legal restrictions. For a ...


10

Welcome to Money.SE. Please take a look at the recent question, Why buy insurance?. Much of the discussion of risk applies to this question as well. The numbers look like your mortgage is closer to 10% of gross income. Life insurance in your case is a personal decision. In my opinion, life insurance should be to help loved ones left behind not experience ...


10

I'd worry about being robbed or losing the money en-route. Is it likely? Probably not. But wow, I wouldn't want to lose serious money in one shot. I have fond memories of the time I was serving as treasurer for a non-profit organization and I was taking $30,000 in contributions to the bank. As I walked across the parking lot with all that money in my brief ...


9

Short answer: Absolutely not, unless you're comfortable with putting years of your labor into a depreciating asset that will incur hefty maintenance costs over its remaining life. i.e. consider your 10K gone forever once you buy the car, and then some. Some comments on your reasons: "Keeping up with spoiled brats" is a losing proposition, and is a mindset ...


9

You edited out the part of you assisting your sister in hiding money from the court. Read your original post out loud to yourself three times. Now what do you think? Of course it is a bad idea, and you should say "sorry sis, I am not going to help you break the law". This would hold true even if you are beyond the jurisdiction of the EU. Edit: So lets ...


9

Banks that offer brokerage services tend to charge high commissions and some charge additional account maintenance fees. Therefore, it's possible that your bank may not be the best choice. Best broker depends on what your needs are. If all you want is the ability to buy and sell stocks occasionally, I'd suggest that you look for a reputable broker in a ...


9

(All slightly guessing: this is how things are in one or two European countries I know, and chances are your European country works similarly - but things do differ between countries - so please double check how it is actually for you) I'd suggest to start with a broker that operates in your country. Once you know how things work locally, you can explore ...


8

The Option 2 in your answer is how most of the money is moved cross border. It is called International Transfer, most of it carried out using the SWIFT network. This is expensive, at a minimum it costs in the range of USD 30 to USD 50. This becomes a expensive mechanism to transfer small sums of money that individuals are typically looking at. Faster ...


8

As a rule of thumb, go in the order of proximity to the transaction. This would typically mean: Merchant first. This is the easiest for everyone. The merchant has motivation to keep their customers happy, and also not get dinged by a credit card dispute, which could affect their reputation with their processor and possibly have a cost too. Interim payment ...


8

What you want is a simple discount brokerage. Brand names here in the US include ETrade, Vanguard, Fidelity, Charles Schwab, and others. Some of them do business in Europe (though Fidelity US split from Fidelity Europe), and there will likely be comparable companies in Europe which do this. Features are generally Buy any major stock, mutual fund, ETF, ...


7

For such a short timeframe, I'd have it in the currency (euros) you need, and in a savings account. The 5 months is not a time to 'invest' this money. Even 2-4 years would suggest just a CD or short term Government bond.


7

Market Watch has an IPO calender with details of upcoming IPOs that should provide most of the information you need.


7

A quick search shows that https://www.westernunion.com/de/en/send-money/start.html says they will transfer €5,000 for a cost of €2.90. Assuming you can do a transfer every week, that would be six weeks at a cost of €17.40. €17.40 is slightly less than €1,500.00. I'm sure there are more ways.


7

It can be very difficult, but not impossible. It will depend on : your working contract (fixed or permanent?). your bank policy (there is huge difference between banks). you relation with your bank ( for new comer the bank is likely to refuse but if you are a good client in the bank and knows the manager, they might accept). your marriage status ...


7

In the U.S, it depends on the nature of the fraud. In general, civic penalties go to the victims or the U.S. Treasury but other government agencies or states may get part of them as well. When Volkswagen was fined $14.7 billion for emissions violations, up to $10 billion was designated for owners of affected cars, $2.7 billion went toward environmental ...


7

No. All tax treaties (which allow personal/investment income paid in one country to get shifted to another country) require you to claim (at least in your mind; paperwork might not be needed) an official country of residence for each piece of income. So, you will then need to file taxes for at least one claimed country. If you claim multiple countries, ...


7

I'm pretty sure it's just a policy that the Fed seems to follow. I know of no mechanical reason why they couldn't use more precise increments, but possibly for simplicity (or tradition) they choose to use more granular rates than other countries seem to. Keep in mind that influencing interest rates is an inexact science. The Fed will set rates at a certain ...


7

As nearly everything, it has pros and contras. The benefit of having two assets is to be more diversified. If you have a tenant which ruins your property, and it is your only property, you are in a bad situation. If "only" one of two assets you own is affected, it is still bad, but not so bad as in the other example. On the other hand, as was already ...


6

This answer is assuming you're in the US, which apparently you're not. I doubt that the rules in the EU are significantly different, but I don't know for sure. In case of an IRS control, is it ok to say that I regularly connect remotely to work from home although in the work contract it says I must work at client's office? No. Are there any other ...


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