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9

The drop in the value of the pound because of Brexit happened in June 2016. All price movements since then are against a baseline price that already takes Brexit into account, and largely reflect markets’ changing views of the likelihood of hard/soft/no Brexit. It’s gone up a bit recently because the chances of ultra-hard (no deal) or hard (May’s deal) ...


8

That's about an EU directive. The way EU directives work is that each member state is obligated to make laws that comply with it. But these aren't EU laws. They are laws of each individual country. They can and will be different from country to country but they need to comply with the general idea. Leaving the EU won't make UK laws go away.


5

It is more an empirical observation than a justified answer, but “something” happens around the £150 threshold: When the total of goods “sold by Amazon EU” exceeds it, a deposit for “import fees” is added to the order (as seen in the confirmation page): Edit: According to The Guardian in Customers in Europe hit by post-Brexit charges when buying from UK, ...


5

Suppose there was a general consensus that GBP would depreciate against (say) EUR following Brexit. Then suppose everyone sold GBP. At some point, GBP would fall below fair value as judged by actual commerce - e.g. you can buy British goods or services more cheaply than those sourced from the eurozone. People would likely start buying GBP to pay for them, ...


3

There's a reason why they changing Auris back to Corolla. Toyota have this comfort that many of their parts are interchangeable between different models. For example clutch for Auris fit also on Corolla made in 2006, Urban Cruiser and (surprisingly) Yaris. And those parts are not made in UK. Next is that not all parts are exclusively made by car ...


3

My best guess is "probably not". My guess is that if you retire in (say) Germany, you will have to claim a UK state pension directly from the UK (separately from the pension you claim from the German government which arises from all your time in EEA countries). To qualify for the New State Pension in the UK, you need to have 10 qualifying years on your ...


3

This would proceed in a course that will have price growth in line with "regular" inflation. Hyperinflation requires inflation to rise by 50%. The UK does do a lot of exporting, so as the pound drops there will be more people demanding exports which will help the value of the pound. The UK exports 55 billion pounds and as the pound falls more countries will ...


2

Two questions here, the most important one is actually whether you can find another ISA provider that will take your business so you can protect the wrapper status for the long term. I'd ring round/explore the big UK brokerage only companies who don't have quite the size of the regulatory headache Barclays may have, and/or may have setup ways to work on this ...


2

"Given I wish to buy a home in Berlin, are there any clear low-risk actions that I can take with my assets at this time?" It is this phrasing which is critical to suggesting an action. If you are truly committing to buying a home in Berlin, then the lowest risk action you can take would be to buy a home in Berlin now, even if that means selling your current ...


2

Don't time the market Every time there's some risk that could cause stocks to halve (or lose more of) their value. Most of the time, it won't happen. I'm sure you won't find any period where negative news don't exist. You just need to learn to ignore negative news. Instead, invest as much into stocks as you are comfortable Stocks yield more than bonds. In ...


2

Let's assume the risk of Santander UK defaulting is very close to zero. Let's also assume the Bank of England is not going broke any time soon. So our default risk is effectively zero. As the other answer notes, there is no big difference between where the GBP is held. If you're looking for a way to transfer GBP to EUR, I like Transferwise, but you might be ...


2

Future political events are very hard to hedge against because you don't know what the decision will be nor do you know if the reaction to the decision will be mild or severe. Any money thrown at the outcome will be a binary bet rather than a hedge. Betting sites tend to offer poor odds and many are sketchy, at best. Currency pairs might work but they ...


1

You're totally right that really bad economic news should make these numbers go down. But there are two things at play: Brexit hasn't happened yet. These trends play out in the long run, but in the short run there are a ton of factors at play.


1

As RonJohn said in a comment the main concern is where you want to buy the house. If this is in the UK then keep your money in sterling and if it's in the EU then moving it to Euro is a good idea (although the timing is important). You need to decide whether you want to buy in the UK or not and that's outside the scope of the question. If you decide to ...


1

Most political wagering websites are not very liquid. A major bookmaker company might be a better source for a political wager. Or hedge political events with leveraged currency positions. A currency position is a currency-pair with one currency set against the other. Then the position can be opened as buy-side or sell-side.


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