21

This question is impossible to answer without knowing some details that you probably should not share over the internet. As you are discovering credit score is not the only means utilized for credit approval. Since you are looking to establish a clear delineation between your personal life and your business, which is a great idea, you should work with your ...


15

I've been in this exact situation before with 2 different banks. With one of them, the minimum payment updated to say $0 due, which is what you'd expect. With the other, the minimum payment was on auto-pay and it still went through which created a short-lived credit. Since it was a card I regularly used I didn't care, as the credit was used up within days. I ...


15

You could be hurting yourself by submitting so many credit card applications, which can be a red flag in many systems regardless of your personal credit score. I realize you say that according to Chase your score is over 800, but what does TransUnion or Equifax say your score is? Do you belong to any of the sites that let you track your score for free? It'...


14

Your question is a bit silly. What does it matter if AMEX apologizes? What does it matter if they have a point? How often does your father make large jewelry purchases overseas? Economic freedom is all about choice. AMEX has a right to treat their customers anyway they choose. That could include for the representatives to never apologize to the ...


12

Just use a personal credit card and be done with it. Your idea of compartmentalizing for bookkeeping purposes is correct and essential to protecting the liability shield provided by an LLC. However it does not require the credit card to be in the LLC's name; it only requires scrupulous separation of bank accounts -- that is, this bank account is used ...


10

I can almost guarantee that it is because you are living abroad. When you apply, the location of your business actually doesn't matter much. They are not really loaning money to the LLC. They are loaning it to YOU, and they want to know where YOU live. So either you are leaving out personal information which is causing them to deny you, or you are including ...


10

Because the owner of the LLC is generally not personally liable for the company's debts (with certain exceptions), so your personal credit history has no bearing on the LLC's credit-worthiness (except under the circumstances outlined in the linked article, such as if you co-sign for your LLC). Put differently, the LLC is borrowing the money and, under most ...


7

Based on your own info, your father hasn't made such a large purchase in years. If you were Amex, wouldn't you want to be certain before approving such a transaction? It is likely that Amex has an approval change whenever certain red flags are triggered, and clearly your father hit at least one of them (maybe, and most likely, something not covered here), ...


6

You didn't indicate where this took place (U.S. or elsewhere), but at the end of the day, if they're supposed to charge you tax and it was legitimately a systems issue that prevented collection at the time of sale I don't think there's anything improper or illegal about it. UPDATE: It occurred to me to add the fact that the sale is not technically complete ...


5

You can always pay it now to avoid the possibility of a late fee (even though you shouldn't actually even owe at the moment) and then contact customer service to follow up. At worst, they'll post your payment and you'll have an unused credit of what you paid. As best they'll offer to refund the money. The important point is, you don't want to jeopardize ...


3

My personal experience has been very low in encountering 3D secure when making online purchases. I can't say that I've seen any sort of increase over the last 10 years. I think the same concept from the linked 2016 question of "consumers don't want to be annoyed" continues to persist. According to statistics on ravelin.com, the national average 3D ...


3

I think the answer could likely vary across scoring models, but in general, I would say neither is worse than the other, because most scoring models don't consider it. From the horse's mouth (dated January 26, 2017): In the past, a statement that the account was closed by the lender was considered negative. That is no longer the case. People today open and ...


3

Retailers (in the US) do not charge sales tax. The government (or the voters, if you like) charges the tax. The retailers have a legal obligation to collect it from you, and you have a legal obligation to pay it. But as SRiverNet mentioned, the retailer might pay it for you just to be nice if you ask them.


2

Everything SRiverNet said about investing is good advice. However, I think they're most likely to charge your card as a Security Broker/Dealer (MCC 6211). The Visa document about it says: Merchants classified with this MCC are licensed, in all jurisdictions they sell into to buy, sell and broker securities, stocks, bonds, commodities, and mutual funds. ...


2

EDIT There are limited circumstances (depending on how the company is set up to accept credit cards) where this could be tagged as something other than a normal purchase, and then it's up to your issuing bank to decide how to handle the charges. Frankly I don't know why you'd invest using a credit card. These are startup companies in most cases, many of ...


2

Small businesses can't get credit of any type, there's no such thing. LARGE business - about $5m a year in profit 10+ years - can get credit. Small businesses, LLCs, etc., can not get credit. There's no such thing. (Note: the "business" credit card your bank offers is simply a personal card with a business name printed on it. There are no credit ...


1

If you applied for credit and were denied, you have the right to a copy of the information they used to make that decision (i.e., a free copy of your credit report). Step 1 would be to avail yourself of this free resource and verify that the information in your credit report is accurate across bureaus. Even if you've already pulled your annual free copy, ...


1

A bit of a frame challenge: Instead of trying to get credit for an entity (the LLC) without a credit history, you should be trying to build a credit history for your LLC. You should do this in the same way as you would do it for yourself, services and secured credit cards. In the meantime, you might want to consider pre-paid debit cards.


1

In US the legal minimum is 60 days from the date the card issuer bills you (not the date the charge is posted); this is set by the Fair Credit Billing Act, see https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0221-billed-merchandise-you-never-received and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Credit_Billing_Act . The card issuer (and/or brand) can by their own policy ...


1

There is a document the describes this. You need to review the terms and conditions for that particular credit card. It could also be called the cardmember agreement. The protections could even depend on the state you live in, because some states have stronger consumer protection laws. The terms and conditions will describe the timelines, and methods to ...


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