53

Charging a debit card "as a credit card" doesn't mean that your debit card will actually act as a credit card. It doesn't build up a debt which must be explicitly paid later, as a credit card would. The amount charged is directly taken from your bank account. The main difference in charging a debit card "as a credit card" is that the authentication ...


46

I wouldn't regard that article as knowledgeable about credit card processing systems, however: Does the restaurant's credit card system typically store the customer's credit card information after the initial authorization until the charge is finalized? If so, for how long is it typically stored? They shouldn't do, unless their business is fully ...


28

It's been 3 years, just let it go. Chances are the transactions did go through but you are either not looking at the right statements or the transactions are showing as something that you can't recognize as DG. Even if you were never charged nobody knows how much exactly you owe. DG has written those charges off as loss and moved on. There is nothing that ...


17

The lack of a signature isn't particularly concerning. Credit card and debit card companies have been phasing out signatures since 2015. Individual merchants may still require signatures. More troubling is that you claim the charges never showed up on your bank or credit card statements. Long delays sometimes happen with overseas use, but having multiple ...


12

This answer is predicated upon your Bank X Debit Card not being prepaid. Would anyone please be so kind to explain me how (where) could I transfer funds from my own debit Since a debit card is directly tied to a bank account, it doesn't make sense to transfer money from a DC to a bank account. and/or credit (particularly debit) card issued by X bank (...


12

Most payment systems today can utilize a token-based payment system. The original card information is sent to the payment processor, who generates a token linked to that card information, and sends the token back to the retailer. The retailer can then store this token for future transactions, without having to store the actual card number. This makes for a ...


7

Bank cards are like keys to a house. They grant access to the stuff inside but don’t themselves contain that stuff. When you deposit money at a bank, the bank takes your money and credits it to your account. You can then access those funds via various ‘keys’ - cards, internet banking, passbooks, etc. When you have an account at another bank, that’s like ...


6

I've encountered similar situations in retail. In the first instance, the cashier was intentionally not charging the customer for their purchases (alcoholic drinks) because he found them attractive. This was his way of trying to get their attention. In the second instance, a worker mistook the customer for an extended family member and gave them the usual ...


4

It is likely that the receptionist reacted to something unusual about your card. Where they expected to see a 3 or 4 digit number next to your signature, they saw that somebody had removed the number. It doesn't matter that it wasn't needed in this case, your card look unusual, it looked tampered with. While the receptionist was wrong about needing the ...


4

I have done integrations with Vantiv, I'm not an expert but I know more than I did a year ago. With Vantiv express they can give you an authorization token that does not expire, so this is how we "add credit cards" to the system we use. Implied is the consent from the consumer to use those credit cards (we have a web form saying you give us access - part of ...


4

If you're thinking of buying a home, don't use your rent in the calculation. Use the expected mortgage payment (plus PMI, insurance and taxes). Also, while the $2000 is a debt, the bank only looks at the minimum payment (which in your case would be $40-$60). So, keep on using your CC, paying it off every month and living below your means. (Since the $...


3

Merchants should ideally not be in possession of customer credit card data. Where merchants have payment terminals provided by a credit card processor (those machines you tap with your card or slide in to read the chip), the merchant doesn't even see the credit card number. Since the merchant receives a transaction identifier, they have the means to amend a ...


3

No, you shouldn't. Due to too many data leaks, even sending a part of the credit card number is not safe. Due to USA poor electronics subscription regulation, one who wants to cancel the Scribd account online need to go through a series of deceptive option screens. IMHO, you should just go back to your Scribd account and reinspect the cancellation process,...


2

Your credit score is going to go down when you start using credit again. You say you don't care if your accounts get closed but this does matter. The problem is part of your credit rating is the age of your credit. When you open new accounts you now have a very low credit age and that's not good. You would be better served to keep a few cards alive. You ...


2

If you change your cards, you will most likely reset the credit age for that account. This has happened to me twice. Once the credit card company offered to upgrade my card and I accepted. The other time, the card changed provider bank without asking me. Both times they reset my credit age. In the first case, I asked about this and the person I talked to at ...


2

Is there a way to specifically reach out to these card providers and opt-out of the binding arbitration? If you already have a card from them, you are bound by the current agreement. They have zero reason to make a change. If that means that you want to cancel the card they will not do anything to keep you as a customer. Even if you spend 10's of ...


2

Based on the situation you describe, I do not think there is an advantage to waiting a year. The act of closing an account affects your score because important inputs include (1) how much unused credit you have available (2) how many accounts you have open (3) the average time-length of your open accounts. All of these are of high importance and will be ...


2

In Poland such things are called "soup made on nail". A deception that make you believe the other side have all the ingredients and you just need to provide small detail. While in fact they have none and you provide them with everything but they leave the impression on by veryfing "they have it" by giving you back what you just told them. Credit card ...


2

(I know this answer is correct for the UK, I am 99% sure it is also correct for the USA, in other parts of the world YMMV). In my naive understanding of how credit cards work I would expect my actual bank account to be charged the how much I spent in the billing period. Normally, by default your bank account is not automatically charged anything. It is ...


1

If it was Dollar General then you're fine. The full process on PIN transactions is Swipe, insert or tap your debit card Enter your PIN Store withdraws whatever your total is from your account (there's a bit more to this but it's not relevant here) The credit process on a debit card is slightly different Swipe, insert or tap your debit card Store ...


1

Which credit card would you recommend to apply to? If you don't want to try a Discover card, then get a secured (Visa or MasterCard) credit card. That's where you open a savings account with the card-issuing bank in an amount equal to the credit limit on the account. Typically it's between $300 and $1000. Typically after one year, you can apply for a ...


1

Your question is based on a faulty assumption: Since debt-to-income ratio (dti) is an important factor in determining one's creditworthiness especially for mortgage rates,... Debt-to-income ratio is not directly related to one's credit worthiness, and also is not relevant for your credit score. For example, even someone with no income at all could still ...


1

This question is hard to answer because it depends on the mechanics of the credit reporting process, and the timing of that $2,000 hitting the credit card throughout the month. It's important to understand these mechanics in order to answer your question. Lenders report accounts to credit bureaus, including balance and minimum payment due. The balance ...


1

Your "credit score" is a generic, indicative figure based on a credit reference agency's idea of what they think are good indicators for creditworthiness. Each of the CRA's will have their own algorithms for generating this score, so it will vary. These scores are not used by credit providers - they will have their own scoring criteria that varies from ...


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