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56

There are several issues with paying for furniture and appliances with 0% credit instead of paying with cash. When you pay with 0% credit, you might be tempted to spend more on something than you would have if you paid with cash, because it feels like free money, and you've justified in your mind that the extra you earn will help pay for the more expensive ...


20

A "stock price" is nothing but the price at which some shares of that stock were sold on an exchange from someone willing to sell those shares at that price (or more) to someone willing to buy them at that price (or less). Pretty much every question about how stock prices work is answered by the paragraph above, which an astonishingly large number of people ...


12

Read the terms and conditions very carefully. Many zero percent deals have a requirement that you pay back at a certain date, and if you don't, you'll have to pay some enormous percentage. Nobody will remind you of the date, because the lender has the secret hope that you will forget.


9

The question is asking for a European equivalent of the so-called "Couch Potato" portfolio. "Couch Potato" portfolio is defined by the two URLs provided in question as, A 50:50 allocation of assets between a long position in an stock fund; and a long position in a fixed-income index fund. Holding these two long positions for five years at a minimum, and ...


8

I don't believe there is any particular structural or financial reason that outgoing wire transfers cost so much in Canada, their costs are no higher than other countries (and lower than many). Wires seem to be an area where the Canadian banks have decided people don't comparison shop, so it's not a competitive advantage to offer a better price. The rates ...


8

First of all, congratulations on saving some money. So many people these days do not even get that far. As far as investments, what is best for you depends heavily on your: Risk Tolerance (how much risk you are willing to accept, which you mentioned was Low in your question Time Horizon (how long you're willing to tie up your money in the investment), and ...


7

We don't have a good answer for how to start investing in poland. We do have good answers for the more general case, which should also work in Poland. E.g. Best way to start investing, for a young person just starting their career? This answer provides a checklist of things to do. Let's see how you're doing: Match on work pension plan. You don't ...


6

In the United States, the Fair Housing Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibit discrimination based on health problems. It doesn't matter how old you are or what health problems you have. Realistically, if you die, most likely the mortgage lender will be paid in full from the sale of the home or other assets or they get the house. ...


6

This answer is assuming you're in the US, which apparently you're not. I doubt that the rules in the EU are significantly different, but I don't know for sure. In case of an IRS control, is it ok to say that I regularly connect remotely to work from home although in the work contract it says I must work at client's office? No. Are there any other ...


6

A friend recently bought an 800€ TV on 0% financing. Sounded like a sensible thing to do. Why pay 800 when you can pay 80pm for 10 months? It took 30mins to set up the 'loan'. She had to sign all kinds of documents, giving away much personal information (age, employment info, income, email address etc). She now has a financial relationship with an ...


5

Putting the money in a bank savings account is a reasonably safe investment. Anything other than that will come with additional risk of various kinds. (That's right; not even a bank account is completely free of risk. Neither is withdrawing cash and storing it somewhere yourself.) And I don't know which country you are from, but you will certainly have ...


5

1) The risks are that you investing in financial markets and therefore should be prepared for volatility in the value of your holdings. 2) You should only ever invest in financial markets with capital that you can reasonably afford to put aside and not touch for 5-10 years (as an investor not a trader). Even then you should be prepared to write this capital ...


5

Summary: the fees used to differ but no longer do. Fees are the same. If you have a personal account, feel free to upgrade it to premier to get access to more features. Longer answer: the two account types USED to differ but that changed a few years ago (maybe circa 2011?). PayPal wants person-to-person payments to be free (except where they must pass along ...


5

I've spoken with a number of expatriates in Canada and Canadian bankers over the past few days. Here's what I've been able to piece together. Wiring Money to Canada from Outside North America Involves Trial-and-Error This was surprising to me. As I understand it, the only sure-fire way to wire transfer funds from an arbitrary bank to another arbitrary ...


5

Yes IBAN is constructed as 2 Char of ISO Country Code, 2 Char of Mod Check plus BBAN [Basic Bank Account Number]. In quite a few countries the BBAN also has a mod check. So in short if you type an character/number incorrect, it will not go to wrong payee, but returned as incorrect account number. More at wiki


5

IBANs have two check digits calculated by rearranging the other digits and country code, interpreting them as a big number and compute the remainder when dividing by 97, i.e. modulo 97. The two resulting check digits directly follow the country code in the IBAN. This is error detection and provides limited correction in theory: A single wrong digit could ...


5

It feels relatively easy because your employer takes care of the calculations and the consequences of your personal situation are sorted out later. But at the end of the day, the structure of the income tax is not particularly simple. Even without taking all the credits and deductions into account, the rules for employers fill a 300+ pages manual. The ...


5

If you can set up automatic payments (like direct debits in the UK) and you can be disciplined enough to not spend the money on something else then this can be a good way of building/improving your credit rating. Banks / Lenders like it when they see you have previously taken, and repaid, credit. This can help you get better finance deals etc. in the future. ...


5

As well as the visual impact - employees don't see the money disappearing directly from their paycheck so don't feel as heavily taxed - there's usually one practical difference, at least in the UK. Employers are generally prohibited in law from explicitly passing the tax onto their employees. Of course the presence of the tax will affect how much they are ...


5

This is not allowed, and there is a name for it: IBAN discrimination. Searching for that term will give you some pointers what to do about it. The EU regulation that prohibits this is 260/2012, article 9, paragraph 2: A payee accepting a credit transfer or using a direct debit to collect funds from a payer holding a payment account located within the ...


5

They don't have to track each other, it could just be listed on more than one exchange. The price on one exchange does not have to match or track the price on the other exchange. This is actually quite common, as many companies are listed on two or more exchanges around the world.


5

I wonder which quantity would you think could be reasonable in my situation. How about zero? You are borrowing at a fixed rate of interest in order to invest and get a risky variable rate. I don't know what markets are like in your country, but in the US, we've had a great run as of late, but historically returns in the broad equity market have fluctuated ...


4

If you are using paypal to sell items online, you need a Premier (or better) account rather than personal. Paypal states: Our fees are the same for Personal, Premier, and Business accounts. [...] If you use your PayPal account to request money from someone, you'll be charged a fee when you receive the payment.


4

Gift cards like this are an interesting thing. They are like cash but with no traceability, as the card itself can be bought with a credit card or cash. They can easily be used for illegal purposes. Do you buy from many vendors outside of your country? I know that when I sell an item on eBay, I'll click US-Only for buyers, as the logistics of selling ...


4

Some Canadian banks (RBC for instance), will accept the format institution/account/transit No spaces, no slashes. Transit number must be five digits, if it's not add a 0 to the front. Just had a situation where the European-based system would not accept anything but an IBAN, so I called my bank and that's what they confirmed. I know this is super late, ...


4

As a non-resident, you need to file a form 1040NR in any year that you have a distribution (withdrawal) from your HSA. From the Instructions for Form 1040NR, Who Must File: You also must file a return if you received HSA, Archer MSA, or Medicare Advantage MSA distributions. You file a form 8889 with your 1040NR, and on that form you report how much ...


4

Clearly this is doable and many people are doing exactly this. At that kind of rate many will tell you to borrow as much as you can and invest. This strategy does not work if you spend that money on dumb stuff, but you don't seem the type to do such a thing. In some will argue that it is the only logical thing to do. Some will say that this is not a good ...


4

I don't follow the numbers in your example, but the fundamental question you're asking is, "If I can borrow money for a low cost, and if I think I can invest it and receive returns greater than that cost, should I do it?" It doesn't matter where that money comes from, a mortgage that's bigger than it needs to be, a credit card teaser rate, or a margin line ...


4

How does 2 EUR compare to how much you would otherwise spend using the card? If you barely meet the 77 EUR threshold, you are paying 2/77=2.5% extra charge. If you typically put 1000 EUR on your card, it's an extra 0.2%, probably trivial. Are the benefits you get from using the card -- convenience, defer paying, one monthly bill, etc -- worth 2 EUR to you? ...


4

I'm assuming you mean 4-6% annually over 10-15 years. If you mean 4%-6% total return over 10 years then this question is easy just find your local country's 10Y bond and that should likely cover it (though barely if you are German). So 4%-6% annually is not a big stretch but it does require some risk and at least a bit of work. A fire-and-forget good mix ...


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