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164

In order to determine what has happened to Motorola, you need to look at any corporate actions that have occurred on the stock. CORPORATE ACTIONS Motorola Inc had the following corporate actions since 1999: Jun 2000: 3:1 Stock split (so your 36 shares became 108 shares) Dec 2004: 0.110415:1 Spinoff of Freescale Semiconductor Class B shares (i.e. 11.925 ...


131

Let's have a look at the various corporate actions for these companies to see what events would affect your shareholding. EMC Corporate Actions Feb 2001: 0.0369:1 Spinoff of McData. Cash paid for fractional shares. 2003-2016: Dividends totalling $1.435 per share Sep 2016: Taken over by Dell, paying $24.05 cash + 0.111 VMware tracking stock (DVMT) VMWare ...


38

The answer to this question depends heavily on your ability to accurately predict a recession. Hypothetically speaking, if you were 100% accurate with your prediction, the obvious choice would be to sell your stocks. You would avoid all of the downside, which would allow you to invest your money elsewhere and/or maximize your reentry when the market turns ...


27

It is difficult to answer the question without doing several time-consuming things. I will, however, tell you how to do them. The question as to their worth depends on what happened during the mergers. Other firms purchased all three firms or were broken into different parts, but all three still exist in some form. No one can compel you to sell your ...


26

I would call that strategy "waste of time": Your individual purchase decisions are not meaningful for the bottom line of the company. A single individual (you) simply isn't representative enough of the market as a whole. As the Canon example shows, how a company behaves depends of a lot more than consumer products, and many of those factors are difficult to ...


17

Your investments are an attempt at hedging your consumer price risks. You are trying to choose stocks that will help fund your planned consumption, such that if the prices of your favorite products spike, your investment returns will roughly compensate. If you plan to consume N widgets per year, you are buying up-front your own "little factory" (small share ...


16

Being listed publicly doesn't get a company any money. Getting the listing is what does it: the company sells new shares in an Initial Public Offering (IPO), the underwriter takes its cut of the proceeds, and whatever is left goes to the company. The shares are then traded, as you say, among buyers and sellers who hope to profit off of changes in the ...


15

If I anticipate a recession should I sell the stock I have, That's market timing. and then wait for everything to bottom out and then resume dollar-cost-averaging? Or should I just proceed as normal? If you're investing for the long term, then the whole point of DCA -- the very definition -- is to keep on investing the same dollar amount no matter what ...


13

Remember the golden rule: Buy low, sell high. The reason everyone is afraid to give you the obvious advice is that they're afraid you won't do that. And on average, they're right as rain. What typically happens at this stage in the investment cycle (depression expected, but before its onset) is that people see a price fall in the TV news, and panic. ...


11

I think you are better off coming here then a place like wall street bets, where their advice would be to keep going. Your issue is that you are speculating with very large amounts of money in relationship to your net worth. You can't afford to take those kinds of losses. In gambling parlance, you are playing above your bankroll. First off you need ...


10

You miss a 3rd scenario - what if the price bumps up to $12.05, and then drops back down to $11.50? If you wait to do this yourself, and don't have a standing sell order, you could likely miss the window of opportunity. But deeper than that, let's address the hidden psychology in what you're suggesting: "If I personally see the price rise quickly to $13, I ...


10

No, it is not even close to index investing. From Investopedia, with my emphasis: Index investing is a passive strategy that attempts to generate similar returns as a broad market index. Investors use index investing to replicate the performance of a specific index – generally an equity or fixed-income index – by purchasing exchange-traded funds (...


7

Time in the market beats timing the market Even if you are a near perfect market timer (you aren't ) selling and waiting for the dip will cause you to miss out on some growth and months of dividends that you could have reinvested. For more information try googling "dollar cost averaging vs buying the dip" and read articles like these: https://...


5

Better $32k to $12k now than $320k to $120k later. And at least your net worth is still positive. The best response is to refocus on what your plan is. Hopefully, you have a lot of potential career earnings ahead of you and can learn from this to be more prudent with your future investments. Somehow you felt it was appropriate to engage in high-risk ...


5

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 formed the SEC and granted it the power to oversee all securities as well as the markets, the conduct of brokers, dealers, and investment advisers as well as the financial reports required of publicly traded companies. More specific to your question, its anti-fraud provisions prohibit misstatements or omissions in an ...


5

The common approach to an IPO is for the company to hire an investment banker (IB) who will underwrite the shares (sell the stock to the public). There may be an associated underwriting syndicate. The IB analyzes the company to determine its value, prepares a prospectus and distributes it to clients. Some IBs do a road show, promoting the company and ...


4

FWIW, this is called a Good-Til-Cancelled Order. It lasts until the order is completed or cancelled. However, brokerage firms tend to limit the length of time that a GTC order can be open. If share price is $10 and there's the potential for a very promising result from a drug trial or a public takeover, why would you ever put in a sell order at $12 ...


4

In one sense, yes, percentage losses have a greater impact than percentage gains. But while losses reduce the base from which subsequent gains can occur, they also reduce the base from which subsequent losses can occur. Stock prices are often modeled using geometric Brownian motion, reflecting that a stock (or stock index) cannot go below zero. The process ...


4

If the market (and your stock) are going to drop significantly, it's a great idea to stop your DCA program. It's an even better idea to sell your stock. If you sell your stock, you're going to pay taxes on the gain unless it's a sheltered account. That's not a bad thing if the market drops ~50% as it did in 2000 and 2008. OTOH, if you sell your stock ...


4

Much depends on your investment strategy and on the duration of the recession. If you are investing long-term and the recession is going to be (or rather: you expect it to be) reasonably short, then selling can be a bad decision even if you are right. There is always overhead in buying/selling such as taxes, broker fees and whatever. If you are right, you ...


3

Since you didn't ask, I'll take a pass on lecturing you about what should invest in and how you should invest. Buying near term expiration long calls or long puts on a high beta stock just before earnings is swimming upstream. Regardless of what happens, IV contraction crushes premium. If you're going to speculate by trading earnings announcements, ...


3

This depends on the exact local legislation. What you paid for the shares (price) typically has absolutely no influence. Price is what you pay for, value is what you get. The present fair value of the company is $10, and you are getting a profit of $3 over the fair value (although a loss of $7 considering what you paid for). I'd say this is pretty ok deal: ...


3

AFAIK, the Kapitalertragsteuer doesn't distinguish different types of capital gains, so, yes, all the same. That being said, there may be differences with ETFs (you may have to pay withholdings on the capital gains tax if the capital gains are automaticaly reinvested) If your marginal tax rate is below those 26.357 %, you can ask the tax office in your ...


3

There are various safeguards, depending on the exchange, and also depending on the broker and interface(s) you operate with. For stocks, a common safeguard is based on percentage from last price, or it may also be an absolute value based on the tick size. Sometimes it's also related to volatility (e.g. limits widen a few minutes before a scheduled interest ...


3

IRA trades can trigger a wash sale in a taxable account but not the other way around. Per Investopedia: In 2008, the IRS issued Revenue Ruling 2008-5, in which it addressed the question of whether the wash-sale rules apply to IRAs. In this ruling, the IRS explained that when shares are sold in a non-retirement account and substantially identical shares are ...


3

In #1, you ask if there's any truth to the possibility of a gap preventing a fill. Yesterday, IRBT closed at $89.63 and reported earnings shortly thereafter. At 4:01:04, price was huge at $85.00 x $89.62 (always reminding me of Black Monday in 1987). The first problem is that the wide spread effectively runs all stops from $89.62 down to $85. OUCH. ...


3

Why should you choose? Take the easy route and invest in a set of low-cost passive funds that follow the S&P500, Russell 2000, a Total Bond Index, etc.


3

In order to have a "market" price and ticker symbol or ISIN (which is what I think you mean by "no one is mentioning the stock name") the stock must be listed on a market. Remember that the stock price is the last price someone paid for it on a stock market. A symbol will be allocated by each stock market it trades on at or just before IPO; there is no ...


3

If you buy stocks "long" (as opposed to speculating on "shorts" and "options", then the most you can lose is when the share price drops to $0/share. OTOH, it can grow and grow and grow and grow. Thus, "Does this mean that losing in the stock market is far more destructive to your portfolio than winning and that you should not lose at all costs?" is a gross ...


2

Stock exchanges reduce share price by the exact amount of the dividend on the ex-dividend date. You can read my explanation of this here:


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