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10

The reason you have not gotten good, logic-motivated, advice about when to sell a stock is that no such advice exists. No one knows which stocks will outperform in the future. Current prices reflect the best expectations of a very large number of highly motivated and informed people. If there was a trading rule that reliably worked better than other ...


5

The company is earning more money, not the people who own the stocks. The people who own the stock OWN THE COMPANY. What you think stocks are? All the shares together are 100% of the ownership. So, that is your misunderstanding.


4

You could do what littleadv said above but there are also other methods to protect yourself which could be more beneficial. Firstly, addressing you point about sort of a gut feeling or reading articles about predicting if a company is going to beat earnings or not, earnings is simply an estimate made by some "educated" analysts. Anyone who can make more ...


4

It depends on the status of the stock. If it trades on the OTC market, sell the shares. If there is no market for the security, your broker may be willing to send you a letter stating that securities have become worthless. Some brokers are willing to buy them back from you for a nominal amount. To deduct the loss, the stock must be completely worthless. ...


4

tldr: The only tax involved is gift tax, and there is a rather large gift tax exemption (an individual can give more than $11,180,000 in gifts during their lifetime before taxes get involved), so in the vast majority of cases no tax is involved. Does the person the stock is coming from have to pay any taxes on their gain at the time of transfer? In most ...


4

I'd guess that it's a liquidity issue. Although there are 3,000+ stocks that offer options (and many ETFs as well), an awful lot of them trade by appointment and have hardly any open interest. Therefore, the return (fees and spreads) isn't worth it to a market maker for the time involved. And then there's the issue of daily contract exercise. The OCC ...


3

Even if day trading is a perfectly zero-sum game - by which I mean than every stock you buy has an equal chance of increasing or decreasing in price, and there are no trading costs - you're still facing the "gambler's ruin" problem: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambler%27s_ruin That is, you have a finite amount of money to invest, while the rest of the ...


3

Most day trading is based on some sort of technical analysis. You're looking for particular patterns in stock prices that provide a signal to buy or sell. The problem is that there are lots of very well capitalized firms that run very highly optimized algorithms to do high frequency trading based on technical analysis. These firms are getting the data ...


3

Your mother definitely owes her brother something. Whether it is legally collectible after all this time, I can't say. Presumably she has deposited, and continues to deposit, the dividends, so the place to start the research is in her current and old records of bank deposits. Also, if the dividends are still coming in, even if she doesn't keep old bank ...


3

Tracking down the history of stock splits and well as corporate splits over the course of 50 years is a real chore. Assuming that the parent company and the spin offs still exist, you can Google for the stock split history. You might get lucky with that. As an example, IBM offers 55 years of split info. You'll have to Google for the details of the ...


3

The main pro of exercising early is that you can sell the shares and diversify your portfolio. It depends on how much the options are worth compared to your other savings. It’s foolish to have most of your savings invested in a single company. It’s positively reckless if that company is also your employer and you stand to lose both your job and your savings ...


3

If more and more are getting diagnosed with depression or any other psychiatric disorders, pharma may not benefit. Psychiatrists may benefit. The cost of medicine is not much compare to doctors' hefty fees. Networks of hospitals who are more focused on psychiatric problems will benefit. I don't think there such kind of hospitals in India which are listed ...


3

A licensed registered broker in compliance with all SEC regulations does not need permission from the SEC to provide extended hours trading. Brokers choose whether they want to offer it or not and many of those that do require that investors/traders apply for approval to do so.


3

Dividends are often depicted as “free money”. When received, they provide investment return and a miraculous source of successful investing. This is not the case. There are two aspects to dividends: what happens on the corporate level what happens in your brokerage account on the ex-dividend date On the ex-div date, the stock exchanges reduce share ...


2

An ETF can be inefficient, however, it is structured to be efficient. Every ETF has Authorized Participants (AP) who basically profit off of the difference until the difference is 0. While a large order will move the ETF slightly off of the NAV, the APs should move to correct it as it is profitable for them to do.


2

Registered shareholders bought or were issued shares directly from the company. They are listed as "shareholders of record" on the company register which is managed by the company's transfer agent who handles purchase or issuance of shares, dividend payments, transfer or sale of shares. Beneficial shareholders own the shares which are are not ...


2

Companies can list their stock on multiple exchanges. Sometimes the securities traded are the same (they have the same ISIN number) but the exchange may trade the securities with a different currency. Alternatively Automated Depository Receipts (ADRs) may be listed. This is where a bank may hold some of the overseas shares in deposit, and list the ...


2

There might not be any pre-market trades. Liquidity is significantly lower in the pre-market and it's common for many equities to not have any trades at all before regular market hours.


2

Quite simply, any marketable item (including a company or share of stock in a company) is worth only what people are willing to pay for it. That's why there is a stock market. Literally every trade made is because there is a seller with an "ask" price, i.e. "I want to sell my share of XYZ for $100", and someone is willing to buy that share for that amount. ...


2

Retained Earnings is the total of all previous profits and losses. It's basically the equity that has been "earned" throughout the life of the business (as opposed to raised through debt or stock offerings). Common Shares is the amount of equity that has been sold in the open market through stock. Sometimes you'll see Common Shares split into a smaller ...


2

For starters, is the RSU already transferrable? As for your questions in regards to the movement of the stock over time, results can vary. If the stock is stable, then yes, over its lifetime it should be positive and should have a relatively standard upward trend. However, with that being said, if your knowledge of financial markets is limited, you're better ...


1

Webull apparently just doesn't want to handle extended hours trading. Extended-hours trading (or electronic trading hours, ETH) is stock trading that happens either before or after the trading day of a stock exchange, i.e., pre-market trading or after-hours trading. After-hours trading is the name for buying and selling of securities when the major ...


1

With most mainstream brokers, for new issues to be traded on the major exchanges, the symbol is available when trading goes live. Second tier brokers can be sketchy. When it comes to grey market issues, sometimes you have to contact a broker's trading desk to get them to get the symbol into their system. Some are faster than others at this.


1

I believe you're overthinking this. Imagine for a moment that stock movements are completely random and there are no fees. Then you can expect that day traders will achieve a fairly standard bell curve, with the peak at 0. Many people will break even, many will gain or lose just a little, and a few will gain or lose a lot. Now if you add fees you simply ...


1

Lets imagine that you pick them at random, and sell them x minutes later also at random. Note that x could be single digit minutes or hundreds of minutes later, and you do dozens of transactions each day. Each pair of transactions might make or lose money. If everything is truly random, then over the long term you would match the motions of the overall ...


1

One Yes, it can be a losing game depending on human nature right? If you double down on losers too often or if you are too greedy and you lose your gains. Two You can lose money by investing in individual stocks which perform badly.If you were just day trading a sector which is in decline, you would lose money over time as it declined (small loses each day ...


1

I don't use Google Finance so I can't suggest a reason why it lacks today's pre-market trading. However, GOOGL began trading this morning at 04:50:43 when 16 shares traded at $ 1,085.34 NASDAQ.com is a more reliable site.


1

One option would be a pledged asset line of credit -- basically you take out a line of credit or loan that is backed by the securities you have invested. Many/most investment firms will offer a product like that. This way you don't have to liquidate any securities and incur capital gains, and you can work out a loan with your family member where his ...


1

Structuring a loan to someone based on market performance is a Pandora's Box. Or perhaps it's as Forrest Gump said: "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get." Some random thoughts... Why should your brother have to indemnify you for realized losses if you sell your underwater securities? The loss already exists and that's ...


1

Looking at the question and some of the comments, I think you would need to look into backtesting. Because what you describe is a set algorithm (a program can run this portfolio), you can easily backtest everything if you have the right datasets. Assuming you can do basic programming/can learn quickly, I would recommend Quantopian which is generally used to ...


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