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24

The US banks are notoriously bad when it comes to modernization of features. There are multiple ways of doing it and many different banks support many different ways, but there's no one standard all banks support in a similar way. Even the authentication is not standardized. The "personal finance" packages (mostly) work, because they are developed ...


15

Fetch them through the Plaid API: https://plaid.com/products/transactions/ In summary, you give your bank account password to a third-party fintech app like Plaid, and it downloads the transactions for you and it makes them programmatically accessible to your scripts (via a REST API). It creates an API on top of your bank and allows you to write scripts that ...


11

In the EU there is the PSD2 standard, which explicitly requires an API. Many banks also (still) have the old German HBCI/FinTS standard that is used to access the accounts.


6

There is probably no standard. However, at least two large banks I know offer APIs for money. You pay a monthly fee, and can use software to log in and download transactions all day long.


5

Banks provide digital bank account statements in form of files in formats like SWIFT MT940 or ISO 20022. These files are essential to automatize bookkeeping in companies which receive a lot of wire transfers every day. I've worked on some bookkeeping automation processes based on reading bank statement files in various formats myself (my work would not be of ...


5

Every bank I have dealt with has allowed me to choose the way they communicate with me, especially for things like verification codes and fraudulent transaction warnings. Usually I am offered the choice of email, text message or phone call. If you believe that one of these methods is going to be insecure, then do not choose it. Use one of the others instead. ...


5

As a rule, API's for customer use are bad news for banks. The idea is noble enough but what is the worst that can happen? Third parties that aggregate, ala Merrill Lynch, and insert themselves in the middle encourage credential sharing, and by extension, leaks. You really cannot be supporting third party apps that you had no part in developing. API traffic ...


2

There are a couple of different banking data aggregators that integrate the different open banking API's mandated by the EU PSD2 standard, for example Aiia and Tink (headquartered in Denmark and Sweden, respectively). Both of those allow you to create a free developer account to test out the service, and Tink specifically seems to have a €0.5 per user per ...


2

I have been automating these things in the past, just like yourself. Many years ago, it was pretty easy to fetch all transaction data using open source libraries (i.e. GnuCash together with the separate library it uses for that purpose). Over time, the two German banks I have business with changed or closed those possibilities. Right now, both in theory ...


2

I can't speak to the legal frame work in Switzerland, but typically in the US, if the mortgagee (the bank) goes bankrupt, the mortgage will be sold to another lender and the funds raised will be used to pay off the mortgagee's creditors. The principal and payment schedule for the mortgage will typically not be affected. You'll just make the payments to a ...


2

What may happen is that you get 100K CHF out of your liquid deposits from the insurance and lose the remaining 200K (or, rather, become a creditor to the failed bank, in line with all the other creditors, and the bankruptcy court will determine how much of this 200K you'll eventually get). The mortgage on the other hand is the asset of the bank and will be ...


1

Well, banks are in the business of making money; shocker! I am 99.358% positive that banks have an active interest in not being on primetime news for: MonkeyZeus found this weird loophole in the API, tune in tonight to see why banks hate him Looking through the FAQs at https://www.chase.com/digital/data-sharing I can see why they don't want to give just ...


1

In most parts of South East Asia API access to banking systems are by invitation only and you won't even get to talk to the people in charge of their computing systems unless you literally make thousands of transactions per day. In all the projects I was involved in that had official permission to access bank data we were required to run our servers from ...


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