Hot answers tagged

294

they're asking me for my online banking username and password. is that information alone enough for them to be able to take my money out of my account, or am i safe? They don't need that information to deposit funds to your account, and having that information will allow them to take money out of your account. You are being set up to be robbed. In the ...


292

You're most definitely being scammed. You're being asked all the information required to steal your identity and take over your bank account. And Austria is land-locked, it has no west coast (or any coast, for that matter).


268

They say "Nigerian" because the savvy ones ignore it. So any answers must be from lower risk victims who are more likely to send the money.


241

Absolute scam. Any time anyone asks you to open a bank account so they can send you money and then you have to send some portion of it back to them, it's a guarantee that it's a scam. What happens is that your dad will deposit the check and transfer it to this woman, then the check will bounce (or turn out to be fake altogether) and your dad will be on the ...


238

Nobody with 40 million in the bank needs a random stranger to help them out with a few thousands. No matter which problem he has, with the liquidity available to him, he can access funds and his bank will support him in this, because if he has 40 million sitting in a bank account, it means his invested capital is at least one order of magnitude larger. So ...


233

This is a very trivial scam. Flow is like this: Send money to Mr. X (you, in this case). Call Mr. X and ask for the money back, because mistake. Usually they ask for a wire transfer/cash/gift cards/prepaid cards or something else irreversible/untraceable. Mr. X initiates transfer back to Scammer. Accept the transfer from Mr. X Dispute the original transfer ...


220

Stop doing this. If your friend contacts you, don't answer until you've followed through on step 2. Go get a lawyer. They might advise you to contact the police and tell the police what's been going on before you get a knock on the door with a warrant behind it. Here is why: you are almost certainly inadvertently participating in money laundering. The funds ...


205

Plenty of people don't have credit/debit cards, if they had cash in hand they were probably just one of those people. Cash first, fuel 2nd with you pumping, not much risk to you in that scenario. Could it have been a ruse to get some free fuel from you or rob you while your guard was down? Sure, but seems less likely.


202

It's a scam. It's called a money mule. Typically the way this will work is that the scammers will make a fraudulent money transfer into your friend's account. Your friend will convert the funds into Bitcoin and send it off to the scammers. After a few days or weeks, the bank will figure out that the original transfer was fraudulent and come after your friend'...


181

This is no friend. The clue is that your user name and password aren't required. I've made payments for my mother in law, and the card number, just the 16 digits on front, were enough to send a payment. No one writes their username and password on a check when they make a payment. Think about that.


179

In any instance where your hackles are raised about a possible scam, but you have reason to move forward regardless, approach with caution, and complete whatever due diligence you can, without direct contact from the potential scammers. ie: if they've given you a phone number in the letter, don't call that number to confirm legitimacy. Instead, Google the ...


178

This is almost certainly a scam or a mistake. This is not good, spendable money: it is not yours to keep. Very simple to handle. Tell the bank, in writing that you were not expecting to receive this money and are a bit surprised to receive it. Preferably in a way that creates a paper trail. And then stop talking. Why? Because you honestly don't know. ...


177

A bit of detective work. The website lists no names for the firm. Any business, doctor, lawyer, etc, is at least going to tell you who the main partners are. The site itself looks like a generic framework with literally no content, just placeholders. A web designer's first pass for a client. But not a real site. The website for the building at that address ...


174

If I had a legitimate reason to give to you $100,000 with a $500 fee, I would ask you if it is okay to take the $500 out of the $100,000, and if you agree, I'd pay you $99,500 without any cost for you. Someone who wants to give you money doesn't ask for fees, they just deduct any cost from the money they give you. Same for lotteries, inheritances, tax ...


171

Anybody that guarantees a monthly (for example 5%,11%,16%, 20%) return that would be great if that was a annual return, is running a scam. If they guarantee they could take your 20K euros and make enough money to pay you a guaranteed 24K euros 30 days later and keep the rest for themselves, then they are running a scam. If they are legitimate then they ...


169

Banks in the US frequently offer these kinds of promotions, and this particular one is not out of line with similar offers. Chase frequently does $300 for a new checking account. As usual some restrictions apply and they vary by institution. There is a whole community on the net that does reward hacking for supplemental income for both bank accounts and ...


167

She is laundering money for criminals, either knowingly or unknowingly. There are lots of ways to make a fraudulent money transfer from an account one does not own. Stolen credit card numbers, direct debit fraud, phished PayPal logins or online banking trojans are some examples. Unfortunately (for the criminals) when a customer informs their bank that ...


156

TLDR: This is 100% a scam. My brother is working in a union and has met a bunch of people and started making good money lately Let me rephrase: "my brother is 'fresh meat' -- he is new to this community so he doesn't know who is trustworthy; he has more money than he knows what to do with; he's got a taste of making good money and now wants more". That's ...


146

To close this out, in fact it wasn't a scam, despite the third letter. The contact details in the second letter checked out against the Law Society website, so I gave them a ring on their general contact number. The "out of office reply followed by silence" was simply because someone had forgotten to change their message from "I'm out of the office at ...


142

Go to the police. This is fraud and is illegal. Sure, this will hurt your friend but better now then when he starts abusing of his position to fraud even more people... Original comment by Bakuriu sorry for not giving credit


142

The scammers not giving your money back would prevent you from pulling out of the "investment" (scam). They may pay out the claimed returns for a month or a few months in order to build credibility to get more "investors", but if they're trying to scam you, there is no way they'd give back all of your money once they have it. As comments and other answers ...


139

Absolutely a scam 100% chance. This is one of the most common scams out there. Here's how you will get ripped off. They send you a check which will deposit in your account Seeing the deposit went through everything looks peachy, you buy and transmit bitcoins. The check bounces in a few weeks and you are out the money or owe the bank if that gives you a ...


136

It is not always easy to tell how a given scam will end up making money for the scammer. This is due to a lot of things, such as intricacies of paper trails, or story details that get passed on / omitted (ie: perhaps your mother's friend wanted the money deposited in a weird way that allows the scam to occur, or it was in a particular jurisdiction that made ...


124

This is 200% a scam Here are some of the red flags, and I've reported the site to its registrar (whatever good that does): You just met him, and are pretty much a stranger, but he wants to send you money and pay your rent. Without meeting you, after just 2 days, he "knows you are good". The reason is unrealistic. He has "too much money". Not impossible, ...


120

It is likely a scam. In fact the whole mystery shopping "job" may be a scam. There is a Snopes page about cashier's check scams, as well as a US government page which specifically mentions mystery shopping as a scam angle. As for how the scam works, from the occ.gov site I just linked: However, cashier’s checks lately have become an attractive vehicle ...


119

Of course, it is a scam. Regardless of how the scam might work, you already know that the person on the other end is lying, and you also know that people in trouble don't contact perfect strangers out of the blue by e-mail for help, nor do they call up random phone numbers looking for help. Scammers prey on the gullibility, greed, and sometimes generosity ...


117

Question: if I could guarantee 20% monthly, why would I let you in on it? I wouldn’t. I’d mortgage my home, take out the biggest loan I can, and keep the 20% myself. And that’s how you know it’s a scam. If it was true, it would not be offered to you.


114

They call you, instead of the other way around. They promise more than 10% a year return*. They ask you for rapidly increasing sums of money. Multiple unrelated domains use their exact website. They ask for more money in the "trial" period during which you can't withdraw money. You find ZERO positive references for the company. They provided an erroneous ...


114

Scam/Criminal. There is no limit how much money he can send into the world, so the excuse is BS. Of course, nobody can say for sure, but the chances are that it is money laundering: Illegally acquired cash is paid in, and the receiver sends it right back as a clean electronic transfer. When the FBI (or the DEA or another alphabet-soup agency) catches up ...


112

(Under US investment laws) Assume for the moment that you succeed in your plan. You invest some money in the Ponzi scheme, accumulate some "earnings" on paper, and then are able to get the scammer to return your original investment and your "earnings". You then find another Ponzi scheme and repeat... Things look great for you... Then, the Ponzi schemes ...


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