273

They say "Nigerian" because the savvy ones ignore it. So any answers must be from lower risk victims who are more likely to send the money.


204

It's a scam. It's called a money mule. Typically the way this will work is that the scammers will make a fraudulent money transfer into your friend's account. Your friend will convert the funds into Bitcoin and send it off to the scammers. After a few days or weeks, the bank will figure out that the original transfer was fraudulent and come after your friend'...


192

I think it is likely that your “friend” is doing something illegal, and that she is putting these payments in your name to avoid getting caught. You may be being used as an unwitting money mule. I recommend steering clear of this. Tell her that you will no longer pick up any of these payments for her, whether or not your name is on them. Giving your ...


142

Absolutely a scam 100% chance. This is one of the most common scams out there. Here's how you will get ripped off. They send you a check which will deposit in your account Seeing the deposit went through everything looks peachy, you buy and transmit bitcoins. The check bounces in a few weeks and you are out the money or owe the bank if that gives you a ...


87

It’s a money-laundering scam, and your friend is likely to get into serious trouble, and possibly lose a lot of money, if he takes part.


64

Yes, it’s a scam. There are red flags all over it. Ask yourself whether you really think a huge multinational like Nissan would work in this way.


58

There are different types of scams. If you browse through the scam tags, you will find some very sophisticated scams that have quite a bit of hardware as well as people. In the Nigerian scam, they are looking for really naive people who don't know much about banking or anything and can be easily taken for ride. If they write great emails and camouflage, ...


57

So just to be clear, she gets so many of these ~$500 transactions she can't even make the time to show up and collect them all? Yet, she still holds down a day job cutting hair? You are on here asking if this is strange because well, it seems very strange. "Bitcoin" something something is a convenient way to explain away strange income sources. It's ...


49

I contacted a lawyer, told to talk to Dept of Labor, DOL said they will not get involved that this is between my and my employer. Advise? What employer? You are 100% not employed by Nissan Motors....


45

Scammers appear intentionally bad at their first contact in order to weed out people who are too smart. Sending mass spam emails to random addresses is cheap. But interacting with someone who replies is costly, because it requires a real human to write a custom response. If they interact with marks who are smart enough to become suspicious as soon as they ...


41

Your friend should go to a lawyer. The lawyer can then make a deal with the government where your friend testifies as to the activities. Your friend may be asked to communicate with his "employer" to get them to do more illegal things. Or required to turn over his email, etc. to the authorities so that they can communicate with the "employer" and get them ...


34

What bank account are you supposed to cash the check into? My guess is "yours", and that's a complete and utter proof of scam. There is absolutely and categorically no way that a reputable company like Nissan would have checks cashed into anything except a business account of Nissan's. It would be illegal and stupid to do so, and no legitimate company ...


29

Obligatory XKCD (CC BY-NC 2.5): The scammers are targeting those 10,000, as they're easier targets. Calling themselves Nigerian princes is a good way to focus on that audience. From a cost/payoff perspective, they most definitely do NOT want a James Veitch, a skeptic who replies to scammers and wastes their time thinking they've got a mark when really ...


28

This is definitely a scam Most electronic fund transfers are reversible, whereas bitcoin transactions are final. Your friend will successfully receive the money and transfer it as bitcoin. When the original transfer is reversed for being fraudulent (or even worse proceeds from an illegal act) the money will be reclaimed from your friend's account. They will ...


28

The possibilities are endless. (The only thing that's not in doubt is that it's a scam, and if you're not in on designing it, you're an intended victim. Very often even if you think you're in on it). It could be a money-laundering operation. (That's pretty much the only real-world situation that involves suitcases full of genuine cash). Or an advance-fee ...


26

It's not really Nissan. The bank will put a hold on all but $100 of the check amount. After a few days, they will release the money, conditional on you making the money good if the check later bounces (read your bank agreement). You will go "haha, check cleared, money in the bank!" You will send the money onward via Bitcoin, which is irreversible. ...


22

is this legal? No, in most places. You are likely participating in money laundering, fraud, tax evasion, or other sorts of crime. You are acting as a money mule. It is bad enough if you receive no monetary reward but if you take a cut of the proceeds of crime you are more likely to be deemed complicit in those crimes. Can I get into trouble doing this? ...


15

You need to get yourself a lawyer now! Your name is on the money transfers. Your face is probably on surveillance cameras picking up the money. Worst of all, it sounds like you did a lot for her, which makes you seem more like a partner than someone doing a favour for a friend. It's possible the police are already investigating, or it could take months or ...


13

As other people already replied: it's a scam. Now you ask: "what can he do?" He needs to alert the authorities, explain that he was unaware of the fraud, and ask the police what he can do to help stop it. The police may be able, with his help, to stop it and arrest the scammers. At a minimum, he can escape legal prosecution against himself.


13

Classic scam. The check will bounce and you will be out of 1650


8

See "Structuring transactions to evade reporting requirement prohibited." You absolutely run the risk of the accusation of structuring. One can move money via check, direct transfer, etc, all day long, from account to account, and not have a reporting issue. But, cash deposits have a reporting requirement (by the bank) if $10K or over. Very simple, you ...


7

This is price-setting algorithms running amok. From the page you link, follow the '2 new from $49,991.11' link and you will see that (at the time of writing), there are two vendors offering this item for $49991.11 (plus $16.37 shipping) and $49999.99. These are clearly not 'real' prices and yet they are suspiciously close to each other. This blog post ...


7

100% Scam They want you to cash a check, which is a transaction that can be reversed such as if the check bounces. Then give them money in bitcoin, which cant be reversed. Most likely the check will bounce but you will already have given them the bitcoins and the bank will expect you to pay back that money you gave them while you will have no way of ...


6

What kind of a scam is this? In my opinion, it doesn't really matter how an individual scam works. All people need to know is that if someone actually wanted to send you money (exceedingly unlikely when it comes to strangers on the internet) they could do so without you opening a new bank account, or giving them full access to your existing bank account, or ...


5

One of the (claimed) features of Bitcoin (and other crypto-currencies) is the anonymity (let's call these Cryptocoin). When two identities exchange Cryptocoin, the identities that appear in the universal ledger are public keys (which can be discarded once the funds are transferred from the account). Many people use Cryptocoin for legitimate transactions, ...


5

In the US it's not the owner of the credit card, the Fair Credit Billing Act limits cardholder liability to $50 if the physical card is stolen, and $0 if not. Rather than the banks eating this cost, they often take it from the merchants, those are called chargebacks. With card present transactions (ie brick and mortar store) a merchant can be compliant with ...


5

Let's keep it simple: The money is a gift to the couple from the WKP. No income tax should be owed by the couple. The WKP, however, would owe gift taxes at the very least, and perhaps would face investigation over what kind of income the money was to them before they gave it away. It's possible that if the WKP has an unpaid tax bill, the IRS could go after ...


4

Structuring, as noted in another answer, involves breaking up cash transactions to avoid the required reporting limits. There are a couple of important things to note. Your bank is required to report transactions that exceed the limit ($10k, if my memory serves) Your bank may at its discretion report smaller transactions that appear to be questionable ...


4

The SWIFT network was not compromised. The hacker's attacked the gateway software installed by the Bank that did not have the right firewall and certificate configurations


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