89

I think that's a steaming crock of cow manure. The (well, a) standard method for determining whether an account is "on the level" are micropayments: you give them your bank's "routing number" (name will change depending on the country) and your account number. They make a couple of small deposits, and then you log into their website and enter in the ...


86

fine because the application was declined anyway. No it isn't fine. Credit card applications generally need a hard pull, so get it rectified. Firstly check if an application was really made on your behalf. Some companies use this ploy to pull you into a scheme of making you apply for a credit card. Secondly call up the credit card company and ask them ...


67

The norm for disposing of old checks is destroying them, if you really wanted a non-shredder option you could cut a significant portion off and just burn those, or dispose of larger pieces at separate times/locations. However, with a name change you can typically just keep using them. Sign your new name. The name/address portion at the top is mostly a ...


55

This is clearly an identity theft fraud in stages. To be specific, this is called one-dollar scam. Even OP didn't provide further information to the said entity, some data is already leaked into the scammer's hand (Here show some of the major data breaches). To fix it : Call the credit card issuer now by using the hotline number printed on your credit ...


46

Use them to make papier mache. Place them in a bucket of water, let them sit for a while, stirring/mashing occasionally, until they become a pulp. Then either discard the mess, or use it creatively: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papier-m%C3%A2ch%C3%A9


40

If you were to read the fine print, you are obligated to sign the card to use it. Writing something besides a signature voids the card. But of course, only if the store clerk bothers to look. You want protection? Use a card with a liability limit.


36

Why on earth did you only consider burning them inside your apartment? Go outside and find somewhere without many people. Could be a park, side of the road somewhere, even an alleyway if you can't easily get out of the city. (Improved idea from Geobits: if you're worried about lighting a fire just anywhere, or if there are local rules about it, many parks ...


33

I have had a card signed as "asked for ID", and it didn't make any merchant ask for ID. In fact, it didn't have any positive effect whatsoever. Most merchants don't even try to match the signature, and most credit card issuers know that it's worthless. I was however once asked to sign a card that I didn't sign at all, and the seller said that he's not ...


33

This sounds like scam. There is no reason for any one to know your username and password. Are you sure it is your fiancee or some fraudsters. They may run with your money or use it for illegal activity.


32

Simple: Use a secure shredding vendor. Some vendors offer different tiers with different disposal practices, for checks you would obviously want to choose the more (most) secure option. Many office supply vendor chains offer secure shredding services - UPS Store, Office Depot, PostNet, and so on. Googling for your local branches should give you an idea of ...


30

Do not disclose any more information and change your passwords to the bank website. You might possibly have to change your phone number that you have linked to the bank account. This is important since you might be receiving One Time Passwords (OTPs) on the mobile number which can be used to gain access to your account. Personally, I think physical address ...


29

When you have a credit freeze, or security freeze, in place with the credit bureaus, this restricts access to your credit report. However, it does not completely prevent all access. Some situations where your credit information is still available, even with a security freeze in place are: Your existing creditors (and debt collectors acting on their behalf)...


29

I agree, it is not a great suggestion. The idea for it comes from the fact that a tax return can only be e-filed for an individual once. If a second tax return is attempted to be e-filed, it will come back with an error. Obviously, if you file your return earlier rather than later, it closes the window of when a fraudster can e-file a fake return for you. ...


28

This can be a case of someone trying to use your identity to obtain credit. I would put a fraud alert on my credit immediately. I went through something similar... got denial letters for credit I didn't apply to. A few months later I get hit with a credit ding from a pay day loan company that apparently allowed the thief to get a loan who obviously didn't ...


25

Well I'll start with the technically correct answer: Sign it. The signature is technically required by the credit card issuer. If you write anything other than your signature you are breaking the rules. But the more realistic answer: It doesn't matter at all. To start with, in most cases you will just swipe the card and the cashier will not bother to check ...


24

Your name, address, and telephone number are all more or less public information. Think about it: how many people do you give this information to every month? If this is the only information you gave out, I wouldn't worry about it too much. Of course, from now on, be more aware before you start handing out information. Just this week, I heard from a ...


23

When a thief submits a fake tax return in your name, it doesn't matter whether you actually owe taxes in real life or not. The thief will make up numbers and claim a refund. The IRS typically sends out refund checks before verifying that everything claimed on the return is accurate. It is later that the IRS goes through each return and decides which ...


22

Status alone shouldn't be a problem. A fellow blogger publishes a blogger list at Rock Star Finance where he lists nearly 1000 personal finance bloggers web sites. You can see that many of them publicly offer their numbers. What you need to consider is whether you are anonymous, or if friends and family will know it's you. "Hey Tev, you have no debt and ...


20

At least in the UK (but I suspect also in the US), many offices use secure collections bins (see below) to dispose of confidential papers that are no longer needed. These are collected periodically by a service company and securely shredded (often essentially on-premises using a mobile shredder). The ones I've seen would be able to handle an unseparated ...


18

Take them to the bank branch, ask them to destroy the cheques for you.


18

That $1 from a transaction that day or at most a few days old is not unusual. Many vendors do that as the first part of the transaction process. I see this from gas stations, grocery stores, and even from places I have bought tickets. The real amount of the charge will appear in a few days. It could also be a charge that will appear every month. They said ...


16

I understand being concerned about identity theft. But getting your credit files locked up or erased will not solve the problem, and it creates other problems. People have been claiming to be someone else to take advantage of the other person's good reputation, connections, inheritance, etc for thousands of years. At least since Jacob and Esau. "Identity ...


15

Give it to your mailman to return to sender. For this kind of material, return service is always requested, and it will let the bank know that they have incorrect address information. If the owner needs the cards, he'll contact the bank, or the bank will contact him to verify the address. Either way, as long as its not in your name, I don't think you should ...


15

The signature line's last remaining real use is to cover the CC issuer's backside in cases of fraud. USC Title 15 Section 1643 states in part: (a)(1) A cardholder shall be liable for the unauthorized use of a credit card only if— (A) the card is an accepted credit card; (B) the liability is not in excess of $50; (C) the card issuer gives ...


15

To reinforce an earlier answer; it is a steaming pile of cow manure. Not only is the bank username/password the most important information you carry, for the real Macoto Bank it would be utterly useless for authentication purposes (as they (should) have no way of verifying that information)! Provided that the Macoto bank mentioned is the Macoto Bank of ...


14

Assuming you live in the US, it is quite normal when you are applying for a loan that the application will ask you to confirm your identity. One of these methods is to ask you which of the following addresses you have lived at, with some of them being very similar (i.e. same city, or maybe even the same street). Sometimes they will ask questions and your ...


12

Giving out your bank account number is not generally a security problem. The first time you write your landlord a security deposit or rent check, he'll have your account number. (It's printed on the check.) That having been said, in my experience, banks do not generally give out balance information to just anyone who calls them up and gives them an ...


12

Report to your bank, close that compromised account and open a new account. Change any password, create a new email account if you have to and never chat to the scammer.


12

When you say "details" I don't know if that includes your username/password to online banking. If it does, first step is change that password, but you should do that while you're on the phone. Changing your password is not enough, you must also do the next step. Tell your bank. Right now. Call them on their customer support line. Don't wait for an ...


10

This has nothing to do with your citizenship. You agree to the reporting as part of your agreements to use services of various providers - banks, credit cards, landlords, utilities, cable companies, phone companies, essentially anyone you may end up owing money to who you sign a contract with has a clause in the contract allowing them to report and check ...


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