Hot answers tagged

232

Yes, absolutely! You are obligated to pay your rent, and you haven't done so yet. Since this was your landlord's issue and not your own, if your bank charges you a stop payment fee, it would be reasonable for you to request that the landlord allows you to discount the rent by that amount when you rewrite the check.


192

I think it is likely that your “friend” is doing something illegal, and that she is putting these payments in your name to avoid getting caught. You may be being used as an unwitting money mule. I recommend steering clear of this. Tell her that you will no longer pick up any of these payments for her, whether or not your name is on them. Giving your ...


160

The existing IRS guidance in the US related to bitcoin indicates it will be taxed as property. You'll sell your coins then when you file your taxes for that year you will indicate the dollar value that you sold as a capital gain with a $0 cost basis since you can't prove your initial cost. You can use a block chain explorer to get an idea of when the ...


114

I assume you are talking about a publicly traded company listed on a major stock exchange and the buyer resides in the US. (Private companies and non-US locations can change the rules really a lot.) The short answer is no, because the company does not own the stock, various investors do. Each investor has to make an individual decision to sell or not sell. ...


104

Your obligation wasn't to write a check...it was to pay your landlord. And you haven't actually paid until money has gone from you to the landlord. So you're still obligated to pay. (You might not have to write another check. Any method of payment the landlord accepts will work. But if they will only accept a check, then check it is.)


84

Your friend is basically doing "Credit Card Kiting". While not strictly illegal* (there are nuances), it's an expensive way to maintain debt. Your friend would be much better off taking the time to consolidate his debt at the lowest possible interest rate and come up with a repayment plan. $35k seems like a lot, but it's doable and his current plan has him ...


75

The best way is to either file a dispute (or threaten to) with their regulator. They do NOT need negative attention from a bank regulator, so it should get their attention if you show that you are aware of and willing to contact them. They take this extremely seriously. You can figure out who the regulator is using this helpful page on the Office of ...


72

That would be the ultimate in insider trading. They made a stock transaction knowing in advance what was going to happen to the share price. They could easily expect to face jail time, plus the CEO would still face lawsuits from the board of directors, the stockholders and the employees.


67

This sounds like a scam. The IRS sends notices of amounts due, they don't enlist 3rd party services for that. The IRS does make use of 4 different 3rd party collection agencies: CBE - P.O. Box 2217 Waterloo, IA 50704; 1-800-910-5837 ConServe - P.O. Box 307 Fairport, NY 14450-0307 1-844-853-4875 Performant - P.O. Box 9045 Pleasanton CA ...


58

Document how you came to have the stuff in the first place. First to defend against potential government inquiry; and second to establish that you held the asset more than one year, so you qualify for long-term capital gains rate. I wouldn't sell it privately all at once, if you can avoid it. If you can prove you held it more than a year, you should ...


57

So just to be clear, she gets so many of these ~$500 transactions she can't even make the time to show up and collect them all? Yet, she still holds down a day job cutting hair? You are on here asking if this is strange because well, it seems very strange. "Bitcoin" something something is a convenient way to explain away strange income sources. It's ...


57

However, I heard that government monitors transfers of over $10K No this is wrong. They want to know about cash or cash equivalent transactions over 10K, or small cash or cash equivalent transactions that are structured to look like they are under 10K. So if you write a check to move the money, or you move the money electronically, the government doesn't ...


43

Do you have the claim ticket? I'll assume yes. Do a Google search for "Dry Cleaner Regulations for [state you live in]" and see if there is a regulatory agency because some states have them, although that might just be for environmental concerns. Worth a shot to call one and ask if they handle customer complaints. Otherwise, the goal is to have them either ...


43

Yes, you are still obligated to pay the rent. I don't know Canadian law, but in the US, your obligation to pay a debt is generally relieved when control of the money passes to the other person. In a simple case, suppose you paid the landlord with cash. If you gave him the cash, and then as he was on his way to the bank to deposit it, or on his way to the ...


41

In general, you can only be charged for services if there is some kind of contract. The contract doesn't have to be written, but you have to have agreed to it somehow. However, it is possible that you entered into a contract due to some clause in the home purchase contract or the contract with the home owners' association. There are also sometimes services ...


41

It doesn’t matter how far away you are. If you have important information that the public doesn’t then it’s insider trading. Obviously the distance makes it harder to prove or even to suspect. The SEC defines illegal insider trading as follows: Illegal insider trading refers generally to buying or selling a security, in breach of a fiduciary duty or ...


37

A cautious "no." Public information is just that, public. If you are able to data mine and use that information to create a buy signal, you are legally able to trade on that signal. Since nothing is ever 100%, your signals would likely just exhibit a very high correlation to stocks being traded on inside information. Regardless of why those trades happened, ...


34

The Régie du Logement is the government agency responsible for setting regulations regarding leases in Québec. They are very clear that paying the rent in full is your #1 obligation as a tenant. When paying by cheque, the rent is generally deemed paid when it has been honoured by the tenant’s financial institution, according to the Régie link above. In your ...


29

JohnFx is right: banks hate visits and attention from the regulator (both positive and negative). I would not threaten to file, just file away and let them get in contact with you. The local branch is stalling you. Do not play their game. Since you already went through the first level of support (local branch, phone support), get the bank ombudsman contact ...


27

(This is not an answer to your question, but needs to be said anyway.) it would be much easier to finance the laptop instead, since (mumbled excuse). Even if it's legal, (and I completely sympathize with your desire to get a laptop for "school") DON'T DO IT. Why? Because it gets you in the habit of putting your future at risk for immediate ...


26

A more serious problem: how do you know who's really buying your stock? "Shell companies" are an increasingly obvious problem in corporate and tax accountability. There are jurisdictions where companies can be created with secret lists of directors and shareholders. If stock is bought by one of these companies, it is very hard to trace it to a particular ...


25

If this is because he wants to avoid paying taxes, will I get in trouble if I agree to have him work on my vehicle? You should check your state and local sales tax laws to be certain, but in my state you have no liability if he does not pay his taxes. That's his problem, not yours. The biggest risk for you is if something goes wrong, you have no proof ...


24

I don't know if it is explicitly illegal but it's certainly against Venmo's user agreement: Restricted Activities ... Provide yourself a cash advance from your credit card (or help others to do so); ... It's also worth noting that PayPal owns Venmo as of 2014 so if your buddy is doing something similar there then the same rules probably ...


22

No. A company cannot bill you for services you did not request nor receive. If they could, imagine how many people would just randomly get bills in their mail. Ignore them. They don't have a contract or agreement with you and can't do anything other than make noise. If they get aggressive or don't stop requesting money, hire an attorney and it will be taken ...


22

is this legal? No, in most places. You are likely participating in money laundering, fraud, tax evasion, or other sorts of crime. You are acting as a money mule. It is bad enough if you receive no monetary reward but if you take a cut of the proceeds of crime you are more likely to be deemed complicit in those crimes. Can I get into trouble doing this? ...


20

Contact the IRS to see if your return has been filed. If you can, try to obtain information on your CPA prior to calling, like the PTIN, CAF (if any), CPA number, etc. It may be in other documents you've gotten from the CPA - particularly previously filed IRS documents. The IRS has a process and form for complaints against CPAs and preparers. I would be ...


19

The first thing to do is verify that this is not a scam and that you really do owe the IRS money. Contact them. If the debt is legitimate and you can't get your lawyer to respond, contact the authorities. Contact the local bar association to see what recourse is available in your state: Every state has an agency responsible for licensing and ...


18

I really like Rocky's answer, some more info: Keep in mind there is no limit on punitive damages. You could sue for the pants (160) + the filling fee (50) + a reasonable hourly rate to compensate your time (assume 200) + punitive damages of 4590 (assume 5000 limit on small claims court). When facing a suit of 5000, it could be much cheaper to settle for ...


15

In the United States, post-dating a check, on its own, has no valid use. It can be cashed at any time at the discretion of the bank. You would need to send a notice of postdating to your bank describing the check. This doesn't prevent the recipient of cashing the check, but it does prevent your bank from charging your account until the date you specify NOTE:...


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