142

This sounds like a scam. The debt itself may be legitimate but the debt collector doesn’t sound legitimate. Legitimate businesses would never need access to your bank account. If you have the funds ready to go, get their routing numbers and do a funds transfer from your own bank account to theirs. Giving others access to your bank account (user name & ...


55

I see three possible reasons: He doesn't have a secure way (or any way) to manually enter card details. Most payment terminals have a keypad and can support manual entry (or PINs), but everything else in the ecosystem has to as well. If he doesn't have a way (or doesn't know how) to get the terminal to prompt for manual entry, then that's not an option. ...


54

Charging a debit card "as a credit card" doesn't mean that your debit card will actually act as a credit card. It doesn't build up a debt which must be explicitly paid later, as a credit card would. The amount charged is directly taken from your bank account. The main difference in charging a debit card "as a credit card" is that the authentication ...


52

For the purposes of this answer I am assuming that this is not a scam, and that they are not the one who led you down the path of needing to use gift cards to make the payment. No legitimate business would insist on gift cards. If you want to make sure that you are not providing them with any more banking details than is necessary, you should consider the ...


42

Use an intermediary. Rather than your client meeting with that forum person, he could meet with an intermediary that will then provide that payment to the forum persona he is contracting. This intermediary could be a friend of yours, yourself posing as a friend, a lawyer, etc.


38

"electronic use only" cards can only be used by vendors that can instantly verify and authorize the purchase, which is most vendors these days, but there will be some exceptions: vendors that use old "batch" style processing vendors that "copy" the embossed numbers using carbon slips (very rare now) offline purchases (e.g. on a plane) The problem is you ...


34

For starters - by not using debit cards. It has been noted on this site numerously that credit cards are safer. Not only in the US, Visa/MasterCard dispute resolution rules for credit cards are basically the same everywhere. In many countries laws limit the card holders liability over fraudulent credit transactions much "better" for the holders than over ...


32

I am not familiar with Russia's postal service, but might you go low-tech and simply have the client physically mail you currency? Again, ignorance of Russian services available, but in the US you can rent a postal box for a relatively low sum and have mail delivered to that address without giving up any of your person details to the client, other than the ...


31

"Need" is a strong word. As far as merchants are concerned, if they accept, e.g., Visa credit, they will accept Visa Debit. The reverse is not necessarily true. Up until lately, Aldi would only accept debit cards (credit cards have higher merchant fees), and when I used to got to Sam's Club, they would accept Visa debit, but not credit (they had/have an ...


31

Use an escrow service An escrow service is a third party that holds the payment from the buyer while the transaction is in progress. Once the buyer and seller agree that the obligations have been fulfilled, the escrow service releases the funds to the seller. There are online escrow services that specialize in handling online transactions. I have not used ...


30

It's been 3 years, just let it go. Chances are the transactions did go through but you are either not looking at the right statements or the transactions are showing as something that you can't recognize as DG. Even if you were never charged nobody knows how much exactly you owe. DG has written those charges off as loss and moved on. There is nothing that ...


28

Using the physical card or not are two different scenarios, namely "Card Present" and "Card Not Present" (also known as MOTO as in Mail Order / Telephone Order). They may involve different contracts, different rates, different risks, and different equipment. Some contracts will simply not allow Card Not Present transactions. You need to actually use the ...


27

The EMV standard supports two (technically three) methods of verifying a PIN. In the first method ("online"), the PIN is encrypted and sent to the bank for verification. The other method ("offline") asks the chip to verify the PIN, and only the result is transmitted to the bank. (Offline is further subdivided into "encrypted" and "plaintext", depending on ...


25

Krebs on Security had an excellent article on this subject in late 2014 (right as the US was starting to transition to chip-and-signature). A few initial details: US Point of Sale (POS) systems do generally support chip-and-pin. The issue isn't technology - that technology (PINs) has been in the US for years, allowing deibt cards to be used at POS systems....


24

Even if they were legit, they won't file litigation (which is a lawsuit) because the overhead costs are considerable. But who cares? It's not a lawsuit until they serve you. Then it'll be a month + til the first hearing, and the suit will be extinguished once you pay them, which you're planning to do anyway. Ergo it's no threat at all. Absolutely not. ...


23

I would look at the bank website for any monthly statement that would specify the last four digits. It may also have been included in any email correspondence from the bank when the card was reported missing, or when they sent you the card originally, or if you changed the password on the card. Many banking institutions also send a copy of any email notices ...


22

Car rental agencies typically accept only credit cards for the rental (you can pay at the end with debit, but the securing during the rental must be a credit card - or a high cash deposit). Hotel advance-bookings - even if many months in the future - will work fine with a credit card, but - as explained by others - on a debit card, it would directly affect ...


22

The "danger" of using a debit card is that what backs it is your real money. If there is a fraudulent transaction, the money that is used to settle the transaction is yours. Yes there is a dispute and fraud protection policy offered by your bank, and should you qualify for it you'll get your money back. If you use a credit card and there's a fraudulent ...


21

EU and more specifically Germany: (Colloquial) terminology is roughly: the card automatically issued by your bank is the "bank card", and cards issued by e.g. Visa, Mastercard, Diners, American Express are "credit card" (I'd almost say that credit card [EN-US] vs. DE Kreditkarte is a false friend). the debit cards automatically issued with a [checking] ...


20

Possibly not relevant to the original asker, but in the UK another advantage of using a credit card is that when making a purchase over £100 and paying by credit card you get additional protection on the purchase which you wouldn't get when paying by debit card. E.g. if you buy something costing £100 and the company goes bust before it's delivered, you can ...


19

It's a scam. Here are the many signs: The bank will never ask for your password. They can access your account without it. The bank will never use a customer's account for their own business. They have their own accounts. "Some guy" is not a bank employee. Bank employees are people that you meet at the bank. Banks do not hand out thousands of dollars ...


19

That info isn't in the credit card transaction data record. Keep and scan your receipts.


19

This concerns me: I should note I'm also trying to settle with them for a significantly lower sum. However, in order to do this I need to be able to pay soon with a card or bank account. Debt collectors are notorious for using any and all tactics necessary to get money from you as quickly as possible. It is very well possible that even if you pay them ...


18

Two issues I see with your question: The word "need" is absolute. It confuses the purpose of debit and credit cards. Thus... No, you don't need a debit card. But it's a handy way to access your checking account (though obsoleted by smartphone bank apps), and get dead presidents without cashing a check. Debit cards are instant access to your checking (and ...


18

Depending on the amount, he could use money orders (for example Western Union), Amazon gift cards (or similar) and DM/email you the codes, or mail you prepaid Visa/Amex credit cards.


17

Keeping a receipt does allow you to verify that the expected amount was charged/debited it also can help when you need to return an item. Regarding double charging, the credit card companies look for that. If the same card is used at the same vendor for the same exact amount in a short period of time the credit card company will flag the transaction. They ...


17

The lack of a signature isn't particularly concerning. Credit card and debit card companies have been phasing out signatures since 2015. Individual merchants may still require signatures. More troubling is that you claim the charges never showed up on your bank or credit card statements. Long delays sometimes happen with overseas use, but having multiple ...


16

This will probably require some explanation from you on the source of the money and the reasons for the transaction. Cash transactions over $10k will be reported by the bank (in this case) on a CTR report to FinCEN. Keep in mind, mere breaking the transaction into multiple smaller ones in order to avoid the CTR is on its own a criminal offense. Just deposit ...


16

When you swipe your credit card, the terminal at the store makes a request of your bank, and your bank has only a few seconds to accept or reject the transaction. Once the transaction is accepted by your bank, it appears in the Pending transactions. At the end of the business day, the store submits all of the final transactions for the day to their bank in ...


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