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15

You may have a few options if the company continues to ignore your communication. Call your state's Attorney General and discuss your problem with them. They may be willing to put pressure on this vacuum salesman for you. Call your local TV stations to see if their consumer advocate department wants to run your story. This has all the makings of a very ...


14

Legally in the US: the standing of the lady is of no concern to the vacuum company the vacuum salesperson probably has a very significant commission - maybe 50%+ you cosigned a legal contract that is still enforceable however since you just cosigned her estate must treat the vacuum company as a debtor and they are the main contract holder meaning that ...


12

There are several piece of information that you left out of your question. If you have a chip card, bought something in person, and used the chip, then a duplicate transaction should be automatically flagged as fraudulent. If you bought something in person with a chip card, but the merchant didn't have a chip reader, then the merchant is liable. If the ...


10

W9 is required for any payments. However, in your case - these are not payments, but refunds, i.e.: you're not receiving any income from the company that is subject to tax or withholding rules, you're receiving money that is yours already. I do not think they have a right to demand W9 as a condition of refund, and as Joe suggested - would dispute the ...


10

This is completely disgusting, utterly unethical, deeply objectionable, and yes, it is almost certainly illegal. The Federal Trade Commission has indeed filed suit, halted ads, etc in a number of cases - but these likely only represent a tiny percentage of all cases. This doesn't make what the car dealer's do ok, but don't expect the SWAT team to bust some ...


9

Citibank just sent me a $100 check. Here's how I got it: File a complaint on Better Business Bureau (I also tried a couple of other avenues, but this seems to have been what worked). Filling out the complaint form takes maybe 15-20 min depending on your story. Citibank then simply sent me a $100 check as a "customer courtesy". I didn't even need to do any ...


8

Yes. Because you co-signed the loan, you are responsible for the loan just as much as she was. When you co-sign a loan, you are essentially saying "I will pay this loan if the other person can't."


7

The bank expects you to at least try to clarify it with the merchant. Once this is unsuccessful, they have to accept your complaint and reverse the charge. As this produces cost and loss of trust for the merchant, any honest merchant is interested to talk with you and clean it up, if it was his fault.


7

This is not something to worry about, in my opinion. You should always be checking your monthly bank statements, credit card statements, phone bills for charges that you didn’t authorize. If you see any, dispute them. The idea that a fraudster would win in a dispute because they have a recording of someone saying the word “yes” seems silly to me, ...


6

Dispute the charge. Receiving the wrong product is grounds for dispute.


6

In Australia, it seems like a common practice that when paying for something over the phone, the guy on the other side asks for the credit card number, expiry and the CVV number ! That's just as common in the US. How do I make sure I am not a victim of fraud when paying for services using a credit card over the phone ? Regularly log onto your card ...


5

Question 1: Who do I report such fraud to? Walmart, or their card processor. They may be in their right to require the original purchaser to do the report. Generally, credit card and debit card fraud must be reported to the bank within 60 days of the statement for them to take responsibility. I don't see why gift cards would be different. You can also ...


5

Keep in mind that the average cashier may not know the regulation. If it is misspelled and they notice it, they could reject the card when they compare the ID. The question is how often do they check ID's? Answer: not very often. Also remember that the most online forms ask for the name on the card. So which name are you supposed to enter: the correct ...


5

The target breach has nothing to do with identity data and everything to do with credit/debit card numbers and security codes being skimmed. The only cards that are at risk are cards that you have used to make purchases at that store during the times that they were vulnerable. I will leave it to others to discuss recovery from identity information leaks, ...


5

SIPC is a corporation - a legal entity separate from its owners. In the case of SIPC, it is funded through the fees paid by its members. All the US brokers are required to be members and to contribute to SIPC funds. Can it go bankrupt? Of course. Any legal entity can go bankrupt. A person can go bankrupt. A country can go bankrupt. And so can anything in ...


5

The chips are not transmitting anything, unless they're very close (millimeters' distance) to an RFID reader that induces them. You can protect them by putting a barrier so that the induction won't work, there are several (very cheap/free, like this one for example) products for that, and many wallets have the shielding capabilities nowadays. Wrapping them ...


5

It looks like your visa being refused is entirely irrelevant. What happens in bankruptcy is that all the assets of the bankrupt entity are taken over, liquidated, and the proceeds are distributed to the creditors. You're one of the creditors, and as you've been told - the proceeds are not enough to pay all the creditors in full. This is quite common in ...


5

You should start a dispute with the credit card company, and they might be able to recover some/all of the money. Usually, if you act fast enough, credit companies (on the merchant's side) have enough of the deposits not yet disbursed to the merchant, and they'll just reverse the charge. The earlier you start the process - the more chances you have. ...


5

What protection do credit card consumers have when this happens to them? Do we have to suck it up? If the transaction was without authorization, you have to dispute with your card service provider. The transaction should be nullified. In such cases the merchant gets flagged for unauthorized transaction. In this case it looks like you have taken a service ...


5

Engaging a debt collector to collect a debt which is still being negotiated by the consumer doesn't violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act or California's Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. I don't see any reason why a creditor couldn't send such a debt to a debt collector. That being said, I would suggest that you continue to negotiate ...


4

https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/chargeback-dispute-charge-purchase.php Call the merchant. Record when you called, and the gist of the conversation. If that doesn't work, email the merchant. Save the email, and any replies. Do that two or three times. If that fails, call the bank back.


4

If the employer's system is hacked and the money never reaches your bank, the employer still owes you your salary. If the bank's system is hacked, it's the bank's obligation to make good your losses; if they can't, I believe that's when FDIC kicks in. (Assuming you're in the US; if not, find out what insurance banks in your country have.) You're probably ...


4

The appropriate response in this situation (and any when a charge amount from a legitimate purchase is off) is to contact the merchant first, then if they won't/can't help contact the credit card company and inform them of the incorrect charge amount. If it's a typo and you don't care, then don't mention it. My credit card company flags abnormally large ...


4

I eat out twice a day for the last fifteen years, and I hadn't happen that more than two or three times (and each time with cents and sloppily written numbers from me), so I doubt it is anything but rare. Maybe you are going to the wrong places? It is clearly fraud, and I would contact the manager and let him know (obviously easier when you are not ...


3

I'll give it a shot, even though you don't seem to be responding to my comment. SIPC insures against fraud or abuse of its members. If you purchased a stock through a SIPC member broker and it was held in trust by a SIPC member, you're covered by its protection. Where you purchased the stock - doesn't matter. There are however things SIPC doesn't cover. ...


3

I think you have a misapprehension as to what the CVV is. First off, every time you enter it into a website, you're "giving" it to someone, same as if you give it over the phone. Maybe you trust that they won't store it, but why do you trust a website more than a person? I don't. The purpose of CVV is to have a second form of check for when you are ...


3

Your linked article mentions contacting the FCC. A coupla years ago I had an issue with AT&T when I switched over from DSL to fiber optic. The brochure promised free installation, a $100 gift card and a price of something like $60 a month. The first bill comes and approx $250, they sent a $50 gift card not $100, and they're billing me for 2 modems, ...


3

Banks are legally obliged to comply with Federal "know your customer" laws. Normally a person walks into a branch, gets photographed by the security cameras, and presents paper/plastic ID documents physically -- which allow them to use all the usual fake detection - look at the microprinting, hit the driver's license with a UV light, scan the magstripe, all ...


2

In my experience, most of the "Extended Service Plans" sold by Big Chain Stores have too much fine-print. Everything they give you in 'the plan'... they take away in fine-print. Most require you to have the ring inspected every 6 months and if you miss an inspection they don't have to cover it. Also, in the case of lost or missing stones, many will cover the ...


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