Hot answers tagged

61

I think you're overthinking it. They are likely nowhere near you and they don't actually want any puppies or the hassle of coming in person. The likely way it works is: they wire you the money and tell you the shipping company will pick the puppies up. Then they email a bit later and say "oops sorry, shipping company can't do it after all, please send us ...


57

The check is from your credit card company. Whose ever the money is, it is certainly not the credit card company's, and they know that. This is why they cut the check to you. You should definitely cash the check (or deposit it into your bank account). You've tried to contact the mattress store multiple times, and they aren't responding. At some point, ...


51

When you initiate a chargeback, the merchant has the right to dispute the chargeback. If they can provide proof that the purchase actually took place, the chargeback will fail. We don't know all the details of your situation, of course, but it appears from what you have said that the tax chain probably has documents that you signed agreeing to the charges. ...


32

Contact the company and let them know you have received the product even though the cancellation was made. Ask them if they want you to ship it back (this implies that they pay for shipping since it was their error). They should be able to arrange for a courier to pick it up from your house so that you don't have to drive anywhere. You can also offer them ...


29

There is actually a popular Paypal scam that operates differently from Vicky's answer. They will send you ask you for your Paypal email, and send you an email invoice from a site that looks like Paypal, but actually isn't. It's a spoof page. The attack is twofold: First, when you enter your account information to "login" to "Paypal" you give them your ...


21

So, what's the point of a charge-back, if they simply take the word of the merchant? tl;dr: They don't. As both a merchant and a consumer I have been on both ends of credit card chargebacks, and have received what I consider to be mostly fair outcomes in all cases. Here are some examples: A nightclub overcharged me by exactly $100 for a bar tab. I ...


16

The percent sign stands for "C/O", which means "Care Of." Care Of is just a part of a mailing address when you are addressing a letter to someone at someone else's house. With windowed envelopes, the entire mailing address is printed on the face of the check. This is not a 2 party check; your mother's name is a part of your address. Try a real bank instead ...


16

W9 is required for any payments. However, in your case - these are not payments, but refunds, i.e.: you're not receiving any income from the company that is subject to tax or withholding rules, you're receiving money that is yours already. I do not think they have a right to demand W9 as a condition of refund, and as Joe suggested - would dispute the ...


16

It's not usually apparent to the average consumer, but there's actually two stages to collecting a payment, and two ways to undo it. The particular combination that occurs may lead to long refund times, on top of any human delays (like Ben Miller's answer addresses). When you pay with a credit card, it is typically only authorized - the issuing bank says "...


15

I doubt its worth the company's time to try to get anything from you forcibly(through legal means or otherwise) after they messed up as described here. That being said, you did end up with items you 're not entitled to by their mistake. I still think the honorable thing to do would be to contact them to let them know as a gesture of good will and work an ...


14

Stores are not required to give refunds. They do it as a gesture of good will toward their customers, and can refuse any return for any reason. That having been said, they did accept the jacket as a return. I'm assuming they gave you a "return receipt" that shows the item being returned and has a negative total. This is your proof that they accepted the ...


12

The point of a chargeback is to force merchants to do the paperwork. Many merchants don't, and are easy targets for chargebacks, even when they have, in fact, provided the good or service. You used a tax prep service. They may have given you poor (technical) advice, but such firms are usually very good about doing the paperwork. That's why you lost.


10

No, you cannot. The FICA taxes paid are not refunded if you're not reaching the benefits threshold. They're gone. That is why foreigners who are not tax residents (mainly students) are not required to pay them. If your home country has a social security reciprocity agreement with the US - you can have a credit in your home country.


9

There is no universal answer. Every company is free to set their own terms. Check the fine print or contact the company. Usually, companies are smart enough to avoid those situations. For example, if you sign up for a "Buy One Get One Free" deal, you can't return the paid one and keep the free one. You should also consider whether or not return shipping ...


8

You will owe penalty to file for year 1 and penalty for failure to file and penalty for failure to pay for year 2. Penalty for year 1 will be moot, since no tax is due, but the IRS doesn't know it until you file a return. If you don't - they'll "make up" a return on your behalf based on the information they have, and assess taxes and penalties based on that. ...


8

I can think of a couple of options for you. One would be to write a letter to Acting Garda Commissioner Ó Cualáin, the head of the Garda Síochána. The address of headquarters is An Garda Síochána Headquarters, Phoenix Park, Dublin 8, D08 HN3X. Another option is to contact the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), an independent agency that addresses ...


8

There are a few different angles to this. Firstly, morally and legally you certainly should inform the company of the situation and offer to pay the 200EUR you ordered the two items at. The question then is what happens if they instead demand the return of the items. Here things become more of a grey area. On the legal side, companies who want to rescind ...


8

Depends on the store and conditions for the discount. As an example the grocery store occasionally has sales like this and require return of all products for a refund. For example, if 12 packs of Coke are on sale for "4 for $10 - must buy 4", the receipt will say "all items required for return". Sometimes the sale doesn't have the "must buy 4" requirement ...


7

They don't care about the product (puppy). The scam is this: They send you money. Your bank accepts it. They ask for part of the money back. Either they overpaid you somehow, or they send you the shipping money and ask you to pay the shipper. Their shipper. You send/give the extra money. HAHA! They are gone! Their shipper was a fake. After awhile,...


7

I have experienced this scam (but not fallen for it) when I sold my old car. The "buyer" says they will pay for the shipping. They send you payment in a form that can be reversed. They then say that they are unable to forward payment to their shipper, and would you please sent the shipper the money (included in the payment) via Western Union. Eventually, you ...


7

Your simplest option, and probably the only reasonable one, is to dispute the original charge with your bank. Since you used a debit card and not a credit card, you don't have quite as much protection, but you still can dispute the charge and ask your bank to step in and help. See this debit card dispute article for more information on disputing a charge ...


7

The money NEVER becomes your money. It has been paid to you in error. Your best response is to write to the company who has paid you in error and tell them that for the responsibilty and subsequent stress caused to you by them putting you in a position of looking after their money you hereby give notice that you are charging them $50 per week until such time ...


7

There's no VAT in the US. What you paid was "sales tax". It is not refundable to foreigners. You were unaware that you could claim it at the airport - because you couldn't, cannot and will not be able even if you come back to the store with your foreign passport. The State of New York doesn't issue such refunds.


7

You may be using the wrong method to get your money back. As others have said, this is not a valid use for chargeback; that is when a fraudulent charge occurred, or when a merchant charges you incorrectly. However, many cards have various kinds of guarantees, one of which might cover this situation. Particularly in some european countries, such as the ...


6

Payroll taxes are taxes on the employer, not on the employee. They're not refunded unless there was a mistake of some kind, and if they are - they're refunded to the employer. Refund on your 1040 consists of overpaid income taxes, which are taxes that you pay based on your income. That also include overpayment of social security (employee portion), credits ...


6

Note: I initially assumed that you were seeking a refund from your old insurance company, and my original answer is shown first. Below that, I have added a new section to address the clarification that you are seeking a refund from the new insurance company. Also, please understand that I am not necessarily an expert in health insurance, so my answer below ...


5

Form W-9 (officially, the "Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification") is used in the United States income tax system by a third party who must file an information return with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). It requests the name, address, and taxpayer identification information of a taxpayer (in the form of a Social Security Number or ...


5

Now today I received another refund in the same amount for the same property. What can legally happen if I cash it? Legally the money is not yours. The best course for you is to return the check via certified mail, notifying them that you were already paid. Just because someone made an error, does not mean the money belongs to you. If you don't and rather ...


5

Question: at what point, if any, am i free to use this money? Never. It's not your money.


5

It looks like this would not work, as documented in the IRS' Offset instructions (bold mine): Internal Revenue Code IRC (§) 6402(a), (c), (d), (e) and (f) require a taxpayer's overpayment to be applied to any outstanding Federal tax debt, child support, Treasury Offset Program (TOP) debt, State income tax obligation or Unemployment Compensation prior to ...


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