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10

In most countries, you are deemed to dispose of all your assets at the fair value at that time, at the moment you are considered no longer a resident. ie: on the day your friend leaves Brazil, Brazil will likely consider him to have sold his BTC for $1M. The Brazilian government will then likely want him to calculate how much it cost him to mine/buy it, so ...


5

Market rate of return averages about 8% annually (sometimes more, sometimes less or negative). To get 30k monthly -- even taking that as pretax -- you're talking about 360k yearly. Divide that by 0.08 and you need to have savings of 4.5 million--- and really you should double that for safety.. Tl;dr: forget it. Added thought: If you really have $20k/month ...


5

This is called "import duty", and it is based on the value of the goods imported. The one to pay the duty is the importer/receiver. As long as you fill the correct information (including the description and value of the items sent) on the USPS customs form (which you'll have to attach to your USPS shipment), you're good to go.


4

International bank like Citibank or Chase: deposit your funds while still in Brazil deposit might take time to be available/clear: cash should be immediate, checks may take 1-4 days, depending on amount they will be available in the states. you can have friends or family deposit more funds for you in Brazil if needed, and they will show up in the US in a ...


4

This question is about PROPERTY acquired before becoming a resident of the US. If you bought property before you were a resident, and sold it after you were a resident, then you pay capital gains tax on the whole thing. Just see if it qualifies for long term capital gains tax treatment, because it is a substantially lower tax rate. You either have a tax ...


4

In addition to filling out the USPS custom forms, you will have to consider what the Brazilians allow for mailing into the country: Amusing that the items you are mailing are not on the prohibited list. The list ranges from money and weapons. to Playing cards and Primary educational books not written in Portuguese. You still have to be careful. ...


3

You only pay taxes in Brazil, unless you're physically present in the US when you're performing the work. Income for personal services is sourced to where you perform the services, and the US only taxes non-residents for income sourced to the US.


2

If your country of residence is going to be Germany, it is advisable to move money to Germany at the earliest opportunity. It is hard to predict what will happen in future, i.e. whether Reais will rise or fall compared to Euro. The question of whether to leave the funds in Brazil or not, should be looked at: If you had money in Euro, would you have ...


2

There are some brokers in the US who would be happy to open an account for non-US residents, allowing you to trade stocks at NYSE and other US Exchanges. Some of them, along with some facts: DriveWealth Competitive brokerage fees Process for account opening is straightforward and fast Mobile app is cool Has support in Portuguese Website TD Ameritrade ...


1

Disclaimer: I'm EU citizen (Germany, so not even Austria), so I don't really have insight from the outside. That being said, I'm not aware that the EU regulations would require an ongoing EU residency in order to be allowed to have a bank account (in fact, even homeless people do have a right to a very basic bank account - as long as their stay in the EU ...


1

This site is very strict about recommendations about products and services, so I will not come up with any links to banks or other institutions, but I am trying to provide some hints. I assume that you currently have residence and an address in Austria and you have a current account in your name with a bank in Austria. So possibly, it will be the easiest to ...


1

There are no tax implications in the US for this transfer. (I don't know for Brasil, but doubt there are any). Depending on where the money came from (gift, investment sale, house sale) there could be taxes due - but that is unrelated to the international transfer. Worst case, the IRS could get interested where the money came from - if you deposited it in ...


1

Most countries tax income in its various ways, but not moving money. If this is a movement of already owned money, it is not tax-relevant. If it is a payment for services done, it is income, and it is the recipient's duty to pay taxes on it. Note that transferring large amounts of money (10k+) between countries can trigger a review, which - worst case - ...


1

If this is your money, and if you can - if asked - prove that you legally made it, there is no limit. You pay taxes on your income, so sending it into the world is tax free. Your citizenship is not relevant for that.


1

There are ETFs listed on the Brazilian stock market. Specifically there is one for S&P500 - SPXI11, which might fulfill your requirements, though as one commenter has observed, it doesn't answer your original question.


1

It looks like you need a lot more education on the subject. I suggest you pick up a book on investing and portfolio management to get a first idea. Dividend yields are currently way below 5% on blue chips. Unlike coupons from fixed income instruments (which, in the same risk category, pay a lot less), dividend yields are not guaranteed and neither is the ...


1

I will attempt to answer three separate questions here: Should you leave your emergency fund in a high yield investment? Should you leave your emergency fund in BRL or convert it to SEK? Can a moderate risk investment in BRL or SEK yield better results? Should you leave your emergency fund in a high yield investment? The standard answer is that an ...


1

The key is whether you plan to stay in Sweden forever, or plan to move back to Brazil after completion of 2 years. If you have not decided, best is stay invested in Brazil. Generally markets factor in currency prices so if you move the money into Krona and try and move it back it would in ideal market be more or less same. In reality it may be more or less ...


1

The United States taxes nonresident aliens on two types of income: First, a nonresident alien who is engaged in a trade or business in the United States is taxed on income that is effectively connected with that trade or business. Second, certain types of U.S.-source payments are subject to income tax withholding. The determination of when a nonresident ...


1

Just a regular bank transfer. Call your US bank and ask for wire transfer instructions. I've transferred money like that from US to Europe and back a few times. Usually fees were in low two digits ($15-$30), but depending on your bank account a sending and receiving side may charge a fee.


1

In General: All transactions are investigated for AML [Anit Money Laundering], and OFAC [Office of Foreign Assests under Control] to detect any illegal activities. Incase any suspecious transaction is detected, it is investigated further. In your case the funds would[Guessing] have been received by your Bank and if it trigger alarms, its further ...


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