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I don't understand is it possible to buy stock at higher price than current price? This is a very common misunderstanding. Stocks do not have a "current price" that you can buy them for. Any "stock price" that you see quoted is not like a price in a store that means you can buy at that price. Instead, a "stock price" only tells you at what price the stock ...


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There isn't any place you can put $300 and turn it into significant passive income. What you need to do instead is manage the active (work) income that you have so that your money goes farther, freeing income up for reducing debt and investing. Investing $300 one time won't add up to much, but investing $100 a month will turn into wealth over time. Making ...


41

I set 980 instead of 880 and it is fully executed. Suppose I'm on the other side of your transaction. I might own a stock worth around that $900 price, but have a $980 target. In other words, I'm happy to sell it for $980, so I have a standing sell order at $980. If any bids appear at $980, and I'm a willing seller at that price, I might see my order fill. ...


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The quote price is simply the last price at which a trade completed.


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The Limit Order are matched based on amount and time. The orders are listed Highest to Lowest on the Buy Side. The orders are listed Lowest to Highest on the Sell Side. If there are 2 Sell orders for same amount the order which is first in time [fractions of milliseconds] is first. The about is the example as to how the orders would look like on any ...


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To generate a passive income you need lots of TIME or MONEY, you are short of both. As other people have said, do whatever you can to reduce you spending and start saving. Don’t think “I work very hard, therefore I deserve xxx”, start thinking “x cost y hrs of work, is it truly worth it?” (Remember to consider your take home pay per hr, not you before ...


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The limit order will match to best offer on books. Let's say the best sell price was 900, it will match to that. You will pay 900. Read How do exchanges match limit orders?


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I may be underestimating your knowledge of how exchanges work; if so, I apologize. If not, then I believe the answer is relatively straightforward. Lets say price of a stock at time t1 is 15$ . There are many types of price that an exchange reports to the public (as discussed below); let's say that you're referring to the most recent trade price. That ...


23

If the stock has low liquidity, yes there could be times when there are no buyers or sellers at a specific price, so if you put a limit order to buy or sell at a price with no other corresponding sellers or buyers, then your order may take a while to get executed or it may not be executed at all. You can usually tell if a stock has low liquidity by the ...


23

You have no guarantees. The stock may last have traded at $100 (so, the market price is $100), but is currently in free-fall and nobody else will be willing to buy it for any more than $80. Or heck, maybe nobody will be willing to buy it at all, at any price. Or maybe trading on this stock will be halted. Remember, the market price is just what the stock ...


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For example, on Jan 29th 2016 the price was reported as £178.21 when viewing over a 3M range, and £12,425.10 when viewing over a 5D range. The confusion is primarily arising because UK equities and stocks are quoted in pence and not pounds. 12,425.10 is in pence so it is £124.2510 And NAV is quoted in USD, so if you convert it back to GBP, you will ...


16

Actually, they are done computer to computer, but only between authorized companies. The Wikipedia article is correct in its overall statement, in that only licensed people and companies are allowed to trade on the exchange. That can indeed, however, be between the computers of those companies and the computer that is the central matching engine of most ...


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Will there be a scenario in which I want to sell, but nobody wants to buy from me and I'm stuck at the brokerage website? Similarly, if nobody wants to sell their stocks, I will not be able to buy at all? You're thinking of this as a normal purchase, but that's not really how US stock markets operate. First, just because there are shares of stock purchased,...


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The simple answer: The opening price is the price of the first trade of the day and the closing price is the price of the last trade of the day. And since the stock price change from trade to trade they are usually different.


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I don't understand how it is possible to buy stock at a higher price than current price? The price listed on a stock ticker is not an absolute "price." It is simply the price at which the stock has most recently traded at. A trade will execute when books are able to match Buyer to Seller at an agreed upon price. In your example, you erroneously agreed ...


13

Here are some plausible reasons why markets might continue to close: Fluidity keeps the market in check. In late night hours there would be less volume, and the markets might be more susceptible to manipulation. In Illinois, USA, car dealerships are closed on Sundays. It's been like that for 30 years and the thinking there is because otherwise the owners ...


12

NASDAQ OMX Group owns NASDAQ, a stock exchange. It is a corporation, and is listed on the NASDAQ as NDAQ. It makes money by: They charge each company to list their stock in their market. They charge for transaction that is taking place on their exchange server They may be offering other financial or other listing (or IPO) related services in a ...


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The "price" is the price of the last transaction that actually took place. According to Motley Fool wiki: A stock price is determined by what was last paid for it. During market hours (usually weekdays from 9:30AM-4:00PM eastern), a heavily traded issue will see its price change several times per second. A stock's price is, for many purposes, considered ...


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A company can issue different kinds of shares. For example, some kinds of shares may get preference in dividends or payment in event of (company) bankruptcy. Preferred shares are an example of this. A company might have several kinds of preferred shares and a 'common stock'. Here is a good explanation. See too the Wikipedia article about preferred stock. ...


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EVERYONE buys at the ask price and sells at the bid price (no matter who you are). There are a few important things you need to understand. An order executes ONLY when both bid and ask meet. (bid = ask) when buying at "market price" = YOUR bid is the lowest ask price on the market. when selling at "market price" = YOUR ask is the highest bid price on the ...


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It looks like GOOG did not have a pre-market trade until 7:14 am ET, so Google Finance was still reporting the last trade it had, which was in the after-hours session yesterday. FB, on the other hand, was trading like crazy after-hours yesterday and pre-market today as it had an earnings report yesterday.


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They aren't destroyed, they are -- in your own words -- "converted". Thus, at the time of sale (which means "now", since you can sell them at any time), they'll have the value of A shares.


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It doesn’t Dual-listed companies are more complex than you think. They are not a single company listed on two exchanges, they are two separate companies that have claims of the cash flow of the same business under the terms of their equalization agreement. So you can’t buy a share on one exchange and sell that same share on the other. In theory, because ...


11

In order to see whether you can buy or sell some given quantity of a stock at the current bid price, you need a counterparty (a buyer) who is willing to buy the number of stocks you are wishing to offload. To see whether such a counterparty exists, you can look at the stock's order book, or level two feed. The order book for liquid stocks. The order book ...


11

Yes, this is possible with some companies. When you buy shares of stock through a stock broker, the shares are kept in "street name." That means that the shares are registered to the broker, not to you. That makes it easy to sell the stock later. The stock broker keeps track of who actually owns which shares. The system works well, and there are legal ...


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There are several reasons it is not recommended to trade stocks pre- or post-market, meaning outside of RTH (regular trading hours). Liquidity is very low compared to RTH Fills of market orders can be way off your ordered price (= possibly higher slippage than in RTH) because of low Liquidity If you use a leveraged account, pre- and post-market margins are ...


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FTSE is an index catering to the London stock exchange. It is a Capitalization-Weighted Index of 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange with the highest market capitalization . When somebody says FTSE closed at 6440, it basically means at the end of the day, the index calculated using the day end market capitalization of the companies, included ...


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The purpose of a market order is to guarantee that your order gets filled. If you try to place a limit order at the bid or ask, by the time you enter your order the price might have moved and you might need to keep amending your limit order in order to buy or sell, and as such you start chasing the market. A market order will guarantee your order gets ...


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It is because 17th was Friday, 18th-19th were weekends and 20th was a holiday on the Toronto Stock Exchange (Family Day). Just to confirm you could have picked up another stock trading on TMX and observed the price movements.


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