17

Before I answer, you should know a few things about me. I've paid to get into a couple of Network-Marketing/Multi-Level-Marketing (MLM) franchises, and I made a little money in it. I have worked in financial services sales. I later went on to get my Masters in Business Administration (MBA). I've been there, and I know MLMs and Business in theory and ...


7

There are lots of answers here, but I'll add my two cents... The best way to win is not to play. MLM is not a viable business model. Don't go in thinking you'll beat the system by trying harder than everyone else. The only way you'll make any money is by recruiting lots of people, and selling products that can be obtained for cheaper elsewhere at a normal ...


5

First of all, make sure whether your current employer may fire you if you work for another employer. Not sure about the UK, but in Germany, you always have to file it with your employer, who may object to the side job of a full-time employee for various reasons. (E.g. you have to be fit when you work for your "main" employer, so you may not work for another ...


4

You will need to create some form of legal entity through which you will account this job. If this is as simple as you describe - just working for someone else in different country then sole trader seems like the appropriate choice for you. It will also make running the accounts relatively straightforward. But you will have to do the accounts and pay taxes ...


4

Make sure you are paid on volume, not people. Almost all companies have a requirement to recruit a certain number of others. That's not bad - it ensures the company continues to grow without having to pay advertising and training costs. That's what the commissions are for. The largest cost of distributing a product (outside of MLM) is advertising and ...


4

I'm assuming this is the UK given the mention of "council tax", though I'm not sure where your personal allowance figures come from - the personal allowance for 2015/2016 is £10,600 and for 2016/2017 is £11,000, so (£30,000 - two allowances) would be less than £13,600. However in any case your predictions are wrong for two reasons. Firstly, the personal ...


4

Source on GOV.UK You may be able to get tax back for some of the bills you have to pay because you have to work at home on a regular basis. You can only claim for things to do with your work, eg business telephone calls or the extra cost of gas and electricity for your work area. You can’t claim for things that you use for both private and business use, ...


2

First of all, MLM was not made to make all members earn good money. An honest MLM is made to allow members to make SOME money using their connections - a good example is AVON, popular among students, who sell some cosmetics to their friends and make some money to repair budget. A scam MLM is made to lure naive people to buy some crap by making them believe ...


2

If the firm treats you as an employee then they are treated as having a place of business in the UK and therefore are obliged to operate PAYE on your behalf - this rule has applied to EU States since 2010 and the non-EU EEA members, including Switzerland, since 2012. If you are not an employee then your main options are: register as self-employed set up ...


2

I am not an accountant, but from what I understand you need to look at tax residency rules for each of those countries in addition to your home country. For example, if you are a US citizen and worked in France, you can follow the French tax residency rules. Additionally, you would have to check if you satisfy the US Foreign earned income exclusion ...


1

Scenario 2 is simple, but complex. How each state treats people who occasionally travel to their state to perform work. Some will want to collect taxes on every dollar, others only after a certain number of hours/days. Others don't care because they have reciprocity. You will have to look at the tax site for each state to see their thresholds and rules. ...


1

Did some googling, and this appears to be a unique difficulty of Connecticut that's hosing you. Typically, you would only be charged in the State where the work was actually performed-- IE, Pennsylvania, since that's where you were physically typing. Unfortunately, Connecticut Law as of 01/01/2019 states: Connecticut teleworker implications ...


1

Accountant and remote worker here. If you are just traveling, on your passport or tourist visas, you do not pay tax. You don't pay tax because you are a tourist and governments don't tax tourists for working on their laptop. As long as you are not employed in the countries you are visiting, no tax. You only pay tax where your official residence is (your ...


1

I'm not an expert on this but as far as I know, you will have to pay taxes in the country where you declare your residency for more than half a year. I assume you won't go and register as a resident in each country you visit (you are obliged to do so after 3 months of staying in a place). That being said you'll pay the taxes in the country where you have ...


1

Whenever you do paid work for a company, you will need to fill out some sort of paperwork so that the company knows how to pay you, and also how to report how much they paid you to the appropriate government agencies. You should not think of this as a "hurdle" and you shouldn't worry that you haven't been employed for a long time. The two most common ways a ...


1

With your knowledge/experience, you should easily be able to find work through one of the freelance developer sites out there. It would let you work flexibly on your own schedule, and you can decide what types of work you're willing to do at rates you choose to work for. You could always come up with your own ideas for a commercial website of some kind ...


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