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You are in a bit of a pickle now, you should have asked your bank how to send a wire with an explicit intermediary. You usually need a different form for such a transfer as they are relatively rare and only used for a few receiving banks in certain countries. (Here is an example of a wire form for use with sending via an intermediary, each bank usually has ...


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You are not supposed to be worrying about intermediary banks, routing is the banks' problem. This is the same as sending a letter, you wouldn't write on the letter a list of all the towns where the mail has to go through to arrive at the destiation. Your money is now probably going to the intermediary bank, who has no idea what to with it, and doesn't know ...


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It is primarily a regulatory issue - an EU directive required countries to introduce a modern 'faster payments' system that realised the potential of electronic banking systems to rapidly transfer and clear money betweeen accounts. (In the UK the implementation of the regulations sets a 2-hour limit but in practice transfers are essentially instanteous). ...


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This is very much about three things: .1 Electronic maturity for payments Some countries are more mature for electronic payments, some less. USA is slightly less mature than as exemple France or Sweden or Holland. It might be influensed by these three countries beeing more on the size of individual states in USA. Take me as an example, it is more than 20 ...


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If they ask for it, yes. I have received unexpected wires before and couldn't tell who they were from or what they were for. Calling up my bank though, they were happy to tell me the originating account number so I could try and figure out who had sent it.


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