59

There are two things wrong with this: Sketchiness with bank information. He could be: Planning to take money out of your account. Pay with reversible/fake/stolen money, then ask you to partially pay him back. Pay with reversible/fake/stolen money, then do nothing (i.e., just so he can get your account for free) Sketchiness with buying an aged Amazon ...


21

I should send him my bank account info so he can wire the money. To be quite honest, this is perfectly legitimate. It's how wires work. Also, you give out your bank info every time you write a check. (Let me strongly emphasize: legitimate wire transfers do not require your bank username/password. All that's needed is the bank's routing or IBAN number ...


15

The real goal may be to identify suckers Con games on the Internet are getting very, very smart. There's a trick: Screening victims to exclude the savvy. They want the right ratio of greedy, naïve and crooked... and they don't want anybody else. Microsoft Research wrote an amazing paper about how scammers deliberately mention "Nigeria" to repel the ...


13

Is it a scam? Yes. what should i do??? Stop responding to scammers on the internet when they message you. How will I get scammed if I send my bank details? It doesn't matter. You don't have to understand how the scam works in order for it to be a scam. The real scam might not even involve your bank details. They might be asking for your bank ...


12

To answer your question directly: There is no honour among the thieves, so it's possible your partner in crime is trying to scam you. First of all - selling Amazon account is against its ToS. See: https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201909000 Second of all - you need an account number to wire the money. Duh. (To clarify: I mean the ...


4

The simple answer to your title question of, Is a credit or debit card refund is technically-speaking the same as a wire transfer? is no. They are not technically the same, or even technically related. In terms of the technical implementation, refunds against debit card or credit card purchases are the same thing as normal purchase transactions against ...


4

This is pegging the scam-o-meter hard. This is going to go one of several ways. There are up-front fees you must pay in advance. You'll pay them. And we're almost there, but oh wait, there'll be another fee you need to pay. And another. And another. They will game your expectations until you've sunk quite a lot in fees. The promised money never ...


3

You are approaching this problem wrong. It also probably should not be on this site. There are some errors of thought in how you are thinking about this from a coding perspective. You are treating credit cards as a category but each type of issuer has its own rules and may have contracts that override the general rules. Each financial institution that ...


3

It is primarily a regulatory issue - an EU directive required countries to introduce a modern 'faster payments' system that realised the potential of electronic banking systems to rapidly transfer and clear money betweeen accounts. (In the UK the implementation of the regulations sets a 2-hour limit but in practice transfers are essentially instanteous). ...


3

This is very much about three things: .1 Electronic maturity for payments Some countries are more mature for electronic payments, some less. USA is slightly less mature than as exemple France or Sweden or Holland. It might be influensed by these three countries beeing more on the size of individual states in USA. Take me as an example, it is more than 20 ...


2

You are not supposed to be worrying about intermediary banks, routing is the banks' problem. This is the same as sending a letter, you wouldn't write on the letter a list of all the towns where the mail has to go through to arrive at the destiation. Your money is now probably going to the intermediary bank, who has no idea what to with it, and doesn't know ...


2

As you state you are interested in Europe (including CH), things are a bit different than they seem to be in the US (as far as I could read on this site). In Europe, we have the SEPA network. It connects banks (simply spoken) and can be used to transfer funds from one account to a different one. When I send you money, I enter your IBAN (international ...


1

From a domestic perspective, within the US, the form you heard about is likely IRS form 8300, Report of Cash Payments Over $10,000. The requirements for that form include a $10,000 threshold which causes people concern when they're doing bank transactions over that amount. However, the form is strictly targeted and often people find it doesn't apply to them. ...


1

The limit imposed by the Liberalized Remittance Scheme is not an absolute limit on the amount you can transfer. Rather, you can transfer up to a certain amount each financial year (currently $250,000 according to https://m.rbi.org.in/Scripts/FAQView.aspx?Id=115). Since this limit is tied to a financial year, the straightforward answer is to spread the ...


1

Banks have to consider money laundering and other risks in providing you with an account, and the approach they take is risk based - they will want to more information and evidence for a riskier account. For international transfers there are more federal regulations and a particular requirements to flag up suspicious transaction individually or collectively ...


1

If they ask for it, yes. I have received unexpected wires before and couldn't tell who they were from or what they were for. Calling up my bank though, they were happy to tell me the originating account number so I could try and figure out who had sent it.


1

It's possible that your IBAN number will change. When bank A continues to operate under its old brand even though it is now 100% owned by bank B, then they will likely retain their own bank code and thus all customers will keep their IBAN numbers. But when bank A no longer exists as a separate entity, then it is indeed likely that they are going to unify ...


1

It doesn’t matter whether the banks are private or public. The acquiring bank will work out its own policy regarding account numbers and whether it would continue maintaining the acquired bank as a separate entity. Either way, you should ask the bank to provide you with the new details you need to give to your employer. Even if they have decided to retain ...


1

Using the bank foreign wired money transfer services will definitely give you the worst rates and with hefty service charges. Because banks prefer to shield them from the risk of exchange rates and choose to use the old wired-funds transfer and clearing system, which every step will incur a lot of costs(even though all is actually done electronically). ...


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