122

Because if you buy a website and just sit on it as an investment, its revenue and value will quickly collapse. You need to keep doing a lot of work to keep it current. You’re not buying an investment, you’re buying a business that you’ll be working in, and most of the return is the return on your labour, not on your original investment.


71

These kinds of credit card offers are incredibly common. More often you will get a certain reward if you spend $X within Y days of getting the card. In many cases you can take advantage of them with very little downside. However, are you responsible enough to have a credit card and be able to pay off the balance every month? If not the interest charges could ...


25

What's going on here is that Amazon/visa thinks that the money they will earn on average from irresponsible credit card users is more value than 50$ each. This is the same logic that is behind the cash back or airplane point bonuses many credit cards offer, or the "apply and get a free 2-liter of soda" that some stores offer. I would need more information ...


17

" What kinds of risks are not priced in, or why isn't this taught as a popular investment choice relative to real estate or stocks?" You are thinking about the concept of rate of return vs risk backwards - the more risky an asset, the higher return it should have. Otherwise, someone would just buy a lower-risk asset instead and earn the same ...


12

This depends on your definitions of assets and liabilities. The word "asset" has a fairly straight forward definition. Generally speaking, an asset in finance is something that you own/control that has economic value. The asset has value because it is generating income for you or because you expect that it will be worth something to someone in the future. ...


10

The most likely reason for this card is that Amazon has an arrangement with the issuer (I believe that that used to be Chase; may have changed since). Such an arrangement may allow Amazon to take the risk of chargebacks, etc. in return for the issuer handling the mechanics of billing. This is advantageous for Amazon, as otherwise they are subject to both ...


9

Member mhoran's comment was an answer. why not just invest with any of the dozens of mutual fund companies that have an S&P 500 index fund or ETF? The ETFs are more commonly not leveraged. Of course, some are, so you'll avoid those. But the ticker SPY is the most popular one and it reflects no leverage at all. You get the return of the S&P ...


9

It depends a lot on the business model of that website. Because it's a business, not just a property or an investment. Here are a few examples. If the site works on a subscription model, then revenues are usually quite stable, if all billing is automated. You may see churn (people stopping their subscriptions), but unless there's is something very peculiar, ...


7

It might be time for an updated answer. The Motley Fool recently launched two ETFs: TMFC and MFMS. They've finally put their money where their mouth is. If these ETFs beat the market after a 10-year period, their stock-picking ability will be validated. So far, they have done well, but it's been a very short period.


7

In order for any activity to generate income, you need to be able to point to where the money is coming from. Websites owners generally generate income three ways: They might charge users to use the site (paywall). They might have advertisements, in which case sponsors pay the site owner to put the advertisements on the site. They might sell a product to ...


6

Google's RSI is using a 10 period on 2 minute bars - i.e. it is based upon the last 20 minutes of data. Yahoo's RSI is using a 14 period lookback on an undetermined timeframe (you could maybe mouse-over and see what incremental part of the chart is giving) and given the "choppier" price chart, probably 30 second or 1 minute bars. Given the difference in ...


6

Not sure how I came across the Motley Fool blog in the first instance, but found the writing style refreshing - then along came some free advice on ASX share prospects, then the next day and email expounding the benefits I would get by joining up for two years at 60% off if I hit the button "now", getting in at ground floor on the next technology stock ...


6

I've had a MF Stock Advisor for 7 or 8 years now, and I've belong to Supernova for a couple of years. I also have money in one of their mutual funds. "The Fool" has a lot of very good educational information available, especially for people who are new to investing. Many people do not understand that Wall Street is in the business of making money for Wall ...


5

I would personally beware of the Motley Fool. Their success is based largely on their original investment strategy book. It had a lot of good advice in it, but it pushed a strategy called "The Foolish Four" which was an investing strategy. Since it was based on a buy-and-hold method with 18-month evaluation intervals, it was not a get-rich-quick scheme. ...


4

The main source is a direct feed from the stock market itself. The faster the feed, the more expensive. 15-minute delay is essentially free... and for those of us who do long-term investment is more than adequate. If you want data sooner, sign up with a brokerage that provides that service as part of what you're paying them for... and remember that every ...


4

The lack of "About us" is veery unusual. I pretended to buy something, and the checkout page had a Terms of Service link, which I clicked on and read. There's a Post Office box which I googled. It turns out to be Stacks Design, PO Box 12113, San Francisco, CA 94112 http://www.shopstacks.com/stacks/ I wouldn't buy from them, though, because they're ...


3

https://www.google.com/search?q=quarterly+and+annual+financial+report+calendar&oq=quarterly+and+annual+financial+report+calendar&aqs=chrome..69i57.9351j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 The third result on Google is: https://www.bloomberg.com/markets/earnings-calendar/us The fourth result on Google is: https://finance.yahoo.com/calendar/...


3

There are two parts to this answer. First, let's talk about the core service. I believe Motley Fool is legit. I've been using their services on and off for almost six years. I started using them at a time when they were still sending PDF research reports and they always had some great insights. I've tested Jim Cramer's premium service as well (Action Alerts ...


3

Every financial services company (and cellphone provider, cable and broadband provider, private energy supplier, and so on and so forth - it's turtles all the way down in a market economy) spends "something" to acquire a new customer. Paying attractive college students minimum wage to hand out brochures and branded fidget toys costs money. A 1 million ...


3

I believe the site you are referring to is http://www.metalprices.com/ It contains prices and charts for all metals and metal indexes.


3

Google finance will allow you to import earnings report dates directly to your Google calendar. See screenshot with calendar import button circled in red below.


3

I think the closest you're going to come to this is an ETF database like this one. I haven't used this site before, but it looks like you can browse ETF's by category and find relevant information for them. For example, you can browse the list of ETF's that track agricultural commodities and navigate to specific funds. I wasn't able to find any site with ...


3

The 'store card' that Amazon offers gives 5% back on Amazon purchases. Some time ago, when I realized how much of my spending was going through Amazon, I chose that card over this one. If you want the card, that's fine, but if you are going to play the reward game, there are far higher bonuses available for card signups. No, it's not a scam. Many stores ...


3

Is this a scam, a get rich quick scheme? Or am I being overly paranoid? As Aganju has pointed out in comments; this looks more like "Pyramid Scheme". Even if initially no money is being asked; it would be a gold mine of information being gathered. This could then be used for other scams. The entire concept of giving an email ID and Name with limited ...


3

I don't think you've been buying index funds I'm noting what they say on their website: CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 77% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take ...


2

You can use Mint in Canada. According to this, Mint is not yet available outside of the U.S. and Canada.


2

Since you are not starting with a lot of cash the commissions may eat into your account. So go with somebody that has no inactivity fee and low/free commission. I think there are number of sites and the ING sharebuilder.com comes to mind. Scottrade also one of the cheaper ones that i used.


2

To expand on keshlam's answer: A direct feed does not involve a website of any kind. Each exchange publishes its order/trade feed(s) onto a packet network where subscribers have machines listening and reacting. Let's call the moment when a trade occurs inside an exchange's matching engine "T0". An exchange then publishes the specifics of that trade as ...


2

Look at the 'as of'. Google's as of is 11:27 whil Yahoo's is 11:19. Given the shape of the Google curve, it looks to me that Yahoo's may well drop that much in the next 8 minutes. In fact, looking at it now, Yahoo's algorithm showed it as about 30 at 11:24, before going back up again some. It may not have been identical to Google's, but it was certainly ...


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