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5

This sounds like a scam to me. The first 6 digits of a Visa card number identify the issuing bank, who they can now call, and armed with the other identifying information you have given them, can try to social engineer into transferring money out of your accounts. You should look in a reputable Canadian phone directory for the main office number for the ...


3

Yes, it is possible for foreigners to have/keep a US bank account*. For the remainder: IANAL (nor tax advisor), and have never been resident to the US. So everyone, if my guesstimates are off, please let me know. I have a US bank account which I opened as a foreigner with tax residency somewhere else. I regularly hand in forms (via the US bank) that I ...


2

Usually there are two verification steps: the name on the card the billing address associated with the card that fail in the case of prepaid cards. Here are some possible solutions: Register the card online Assign a name and address to it References How to use a no name prepaid Master Card for online purchase - Quora Gift Card Frequently Asked Questions ...


2

The kicker is the balance transfer fees (not to be confused with the interest rate). My guess is that B charges a flat 2-3% fee upfront just for doing the transfer. The "0% interest" might also be deferred, meaning if you miss a payment (intentionally or from some mistake) or don't pay off the balance in 12 months, they'll retroactively charge you all of the ...


2

Well a friend offered to buy that ticket for me and I'll transfer the money back to him. But I also got a reply from ANZ bank. It appears the answer is generally "NO", but also "maybe yes if you ask each time you need to do so". Here's the main parts of their reply: Regretfully your new request is not possible because it defeats the purpose of ...


1

Typically, the bank knows your visa / citizenship status (because they require to tell them when you open the account) and most banks are reluctant to keep your account open once you are no longer living in the US. You will find that out when your bank contacts you about it, or if they do not have your new address, when they close your account on you. ...


1

You can definitely do what you propose. Note there are usually upfront balance transfer fees (typically 1-5%), so you have to factor that into the total cost. But even with a one time 5% hit you're still better off than the 10% APR you have now, at least for the first 12 months. Two things to keep in mind with your plan: You must consider the possibility ...


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