34

I'm more wary of the photo ID than the utility bill. I haven't pulled the trigger on solar but I did do some price shopping. Every company needed a copy of my electric bill in order to provide a quote but I don't recall them needing my ID at the initial quote stage. The request very well could be legit though, especially if the company calling you is a third ...


25

In my opinion, subtenant B should pay 1/4 of the utilities. Each person consumes 1/4 of the utilities. Normally, each person would pay 1/4 of the utilities. However, Subtenant A has an agreement with the two co-tenants that he doesn't have to pay for utilities (it is included in his rent). This means that the co-tenants get the rent, but need to pay for ...


25

Identity theft, probably. Photo ID is not something a business has a legitimate interest in, unless the business is granting you a loan. Where I live, it is pretty much usual to ask a customer to show a recent utility bill (electricity, water) as a weak form of a postal address verification. Both things may or may not be enough to get you a loan. Here, a ...


9

Let's suppose they really are selling solar electric systems. Perhaps they are engaged in other kinds of fraud instead, in which case your ID and bill could be used to buy other expensive things on merchant credit (e.g. a used automobile; jewelry; i-phones). So these solar generators are expensive systems, and they earn sales commissions. I speculate the ...


8

First, as a realtor, part of what I'm supposed to do to ensure a smooth closing is the make sure the utilities are taken care of. This means that gas, electricity, and water companies have all been notified and produced a final bill which needs to be paid prior to, or at the closing. It may seem minor, but I've seen money held back at closing if the final ...


7

To me, there are 2 separate issues to be addressed here: Q1. Are you legally responsible for the bill? The short answer here seems to be yes. While it may be as simple as sending a polite letter to the new property owners, asking them to pay the bill and letting them know that the service needs to be transferred into their name now, that is probably all ...


7

As it turns out, Talgov has a convoluted way it bills taxes which it doesn't explain on its bills or website. Its website claims to bill electricity at a rate of $7.59/month + $0.10522/kWh but, with taxes, it actually comes to $8.5631/month plus $0.11598/kWh. On top of the advertised rate, it bills a gross receipts tax of 2.56406%. It also bills a public ...


6

Of course it is. If it's that important, you should add the contingency exactly as you describe. If they wish to sell the house, this isn't a burden that should concern them. Unless of course, no internet is available.


6

It sounds like you agreed to have the utility in your name when you moved in, even though this was a mistake. I'm guessing you may have signed a document reflecting this. If you simply stop paying, you can expect the service will be cut off and the bill may eventually find its way to a collection agency. You should expect to see a black mark on your credit ...


5

It's slamming Slamming is when they switch your utility provider without your knowledge. Look at your electric bill. You will find separate line-items for the cost of distribution of power (use of the lines going to your house) and cost of generating that power. You can't change your distribution company - that's your local power company (Edison). But you ...


4

An alternative to Ben Miller's answer is for you to see if the subtenant A would agree to start paying a share of utilities in exchange for lower rent. Since his contract may not change when a fourth person begins living in the home, he would still be paying the same as when he was the only subtenant. His rent is probably near 1/3 of the total rent plus some ...


4

First measure the actual power draw for your devices, or you may waste effort through premature optimization. It might not be worth the trouble to unplug an idle device every night just to save a penny or two. I suggest you get your hands on something like the Kill-A-Watt, to begin with. Essentially, it's a pass-through device that measures power ...


4

A similar thing happened to me. The place I was selling no longer had a tenant so there was no active cable or phone service. But the water and electricity were still on. Closing had been delayed once by the buyer, so I didn't contact the utilities until the day after closing. At closing I informed the buyer and their agent that I would contact the utilities ...


4

Generally, the person whose name is on the utility bill is the person the utility has a contract with and can demand payment from. The owner is generally the person who has an insurance policy on the house, since their lender will insist upon this. The occupant may have their own policy (renter's insurance, eg) to cover their possessions as opposed to the ...


4

You could invest into a bidet. A bidet is a shower which allows you to clean your nether-regions after using the toilet. When you use a bidet, you can use a lot less toilet paper. But you will of course slightly increase your warm water consumption. They are available in form of a stand-alone installation which looks like a cross-breed between a toilet ...


3

I don't know about the U.S., but in Germany, if you want to change your utility provider, they only need your meter ID number to process this. There have been cases where a change to another provider was performed without the customer wanting this.


3

I love the bidet idea. Other than that you've got an array of tissue quality options that can impact price significantly. You could try to go for the truckstop/restaurant quality giant rolls, might save you a bit, but standard sized rolls frequently go on sale. The Costco toilet paper standard price (might vary by area) is $0.00125/sheet. If you already ...


3

If you are spending $3/week on toilet paper, the likely problem is not the wiping technique, but the folding technique. People who wad up a large amount of paper will use far more than someone who pulls out 5 or so sheets (2-ply) and folds them. As a child I had a friend with a very large family, and there was a house rule that limited the number of sheets ...


3

Short answer: Person A Here is why. When Person A set up the utility contract they would have been credit checked. The account, and therefore the line of credit, is in their name. Person B's direct debit is not visible to the credit reference agencies. Their credit status is unaffected (…unless the direct debit is unaffordable and causes Person B's other ...


2

Assume that the rent you owe the landlord is $1200 a month and the utilities are $300 a month on average. Each person is responsible for $400 to the landlord (1200/3) and each person is responsible for $100 in utilities. You should have factored into the subs rent the 1/3 of the estimated Utilities. If you didn't do that, then each of the main tenants will ...


2

is your credit history ruined, or merely dinged? Is the blow recoverable? Any bad credit rating event is recoverable given enough time / money to solve the problem. As far as "Ruined" vs" "Dinged", well, that's a matter of opinion; some people think that one bad item is the end of the world, others not so much. You will have an unpaid debt listed on ...


2

Utilities: Whoever makes the contract with the utility company. Typically, that would be the person(s) living in the house and using the power/water/etc. Utility bills are not a government thing like taxes, which fall on you no matter what, you need to explicitly make them. When you move into a house (bought or rented), there is no contract, and if you don'...


1

You could save money on the paper instead. For example, Costco Kirkland Signature paper is $26.99 for 36 rolls, or 75 cents per roll. It seems unlikely that you’re personally using four rolls per week, so you could save money by switching. (I have no affiliation with Costco.)


1

Can't pretend I have a complete answer, but perhaps you could use your credit history as proof of payment? It was on your credit report - did it come off when you paid it? When I say proof, I don't mean proof in court, but something that will convince the accountants at the utility. There's always a chance that you can get a human to work with you. Maybe ...


1

An ACH is essentially presented for payment the same way a check is. Some merchants even refer to it as an electronic check payment option. If you do not have the funds to in your account to cover it when it presents (or an overdraft arrangement on your account), it will be returned for NSF (insufficient funds) just like a check. A declined transaction, ...


1

If the utility provider reports the account to a credit reference agency then it will be under the details of the account holder (Person A). Who is making the payments is moot. Some may not report, or only report if the account falls into default. There are also three main agencies and they may not report to all of them. If the utility provider does ...


1

The first thing you should do, and should have been doing all this time if you weren't, is to take the money you would've paid in the payment plan and set it aside in a separate savings account. If your plan was 2 years, $65 a month, then set that aside, now. That will allow you to be in a better negotiating position when this is finally resolved. It's ...


1

Here is another possibility. Let the co-tenant who receives payments from subtenants be C and the other co-tenant be D. D is responsible for 1/4 of the utilities. Subtenant B is also responsible for 1/4 of the utilities. As far as utilities, co-tenant C is responsible for himself and Subtenant A and should pay 1/2 of the utilities. His agreement with A ...


1

The key is measuring. Like any project you need to evaluate a baseline, make a change, then re-evaluate. Otherwise you are blindly spending money to save, or worse, being manipulated by advertising. Like Chris W. Rea said before me, using a tool like a Kill-A-Watt to measure the effectiveness of what you are about to do is the most important step. For ...


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