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No, private companies have no obligation to help you sell their shares. It may not be legal, but there is very little you can do short of suing the company. Great article about this from the Wall Street Journal here. You could approach the company and ask if they are interested in buying back shares, or if they know anybody who is interested in buying. But ...


24

The company going public is probably your best chance of being able to sell your shares. Therefore, your first job should probably be to try and see if there are any indicators that this might still happen: scour their website and financial news websites for anything that might indicate that this is still a possibility. If you do still have contacts within ...


9

I think you are confused about what the IRS considers a business or not. The IRS has written on this issue regarding a person who makes investments for a living with Topic No. 429 Traders in Securities (Information for Form 1040 Filers) which classifies individuals as: Investors, Traders, and Dealers. Skipping Dealers as they have obvious customers, So an ...


9

In general, shares in a private company aren't worth anything. (Unless the company is paying dividends or they give voting privileges or something.) There's no good way to convert them into cash unless the company is buying.


8

You go to a lawyer and tell them what you want to do. You need a lawyer because you want to make sure a transaction like this is watertight. Lawyers know exactly the right way to do this In your jurisdiction.


6

From the FHA documentation you link to, there are specific types of discrimination that are not allowed Who Is Protected? The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing because of: Race Color National Origin Religion Sex Familial Status Disability You are perfectly free to negotiate harder with someone you ...


6

Separate accounts may be better if you live in a state where 529 contributions are deductible from your state income taxes. OP did not list a state, but you may need separate accounts to claim the deduction for both children. In Maryland the deduction is "per account"[1] or "per beneficiary", and each account can typically only have one beneficiary at a ...


5

Yes, sort of, unless Congress changes the laws. Currently, past earnings are adjusted by an "index factor" (to use the SSA term) which isn't precisely the inflation rate, but is similar. It is calculated from average wages for the past years compared to the current year. Here's a link to an example: https://www.ssa.gov/oact/progdata/retirebenefit1.html ...


5

No, that's not typical. The IRS refunds site suggests you call if: It has been 21 days or more since you e-filed It has been 6 weeks or more since you mailed your return "Where's My Refund" tells you to contact the IRS It might take longer for prior year returns but I don't see any alternate timelines for prior year returns, in no case would I ...


4

Answers to your questions: Can I continue with my individual HDHP from my employer and change my family HSA contribution to an individual; and at the same time can my wife do the individual FSA? Would this avoid a conflict? Unfortunately, FSAs automatically cover the medical expenses of a spouse. This means that if your wife has an FSA, you are ...


4

Pershing is a respected custodian and there are no concerns about Pershing taking/misappropriating your grandfather's money. However, the advisor and the broker could withdraw money from your grandfather's account if he signed paperwork authorizing them to do so. The only way to be certain is to review copies of the documents your GF signed when opening ...


4

Typically, companies have 3-4 year vesting schedules, which are orthogonal to why you separated from the company. Given that and the numbers you showed, I'd say that you are only fractionally vested in the company match. (Of course, all of your contributions are, and have always been 100% yours.)


3

No, You cannot enter any order without the risk of the order getting executed. In my humble opinion, the fault resides with those who read and look at the order books and then take advantage. But the general public loves a hanging, and I fully agree, This article is by a similar sounding name.


3

You need to find the documents related to your 401(k) program. They might be available on the 401(k) site. You need to find if when they layoff an employee they accelerate the vesting schedule. Then you need to find the vesting schedule. You need to pay attention to the partial years. 2014 to 2016 could be 2 or 3 years. Your quarterly statement or the ...


2

Deflation is a pretty destructive thing for an economy (I assume we're talking about prolonged, meaningful deflation not "hey, look, we actually had 0.2% deflation in April before inflation resumed in May and June"). The government balance sheet would be hurt a bit by entitlements like Social Security and interest rate payments rising in nominal dollars. ...


2

Will this be your primary residence? If the answer is "no", then you do not qualify. Does your employer allow "hardship withdrawals"? Not all of them do. There will be withholding and it is not clear if that will be at 20%, 30% (if under age 59.5), or some other amount dictated by the plan. So you will pay some of it right away. Then you will settle ...


2

That got me a bit worried as the hardcopies now have my SSN and date of birth on them and I sure wouldn't want them lying around (identity theft risk). Identity theft is a legitimate concern, but the good news is that financial institutions are (in much of the world) just about the most highly regulated and highly secured entities that consumers regularly ...


2

Why would you open an account with an institution that you don't trust to keep your information private ? Banks are fairly well regulated and I would definitely trust the bank far more than almost any employer that has the same information on file.


2

There are 3 main arguments for why you should concentrate your investments in the US rather than holding international funds, they are covered in greater detail here. But broadly speaking they boil down to: Added risk - currency risks and a lower level of transparency in relation in the market tend to make international funds riskier investments. The US has ...


2

Things are not the same as they were 15 to 20 years ago. Back then, if you wrote a bad check, they would put it on the wall of certain business establishments so all your friends and neighbors would know about it. That is rarely done anymore, and if it is done to you with this compromised account, you might have grounds for a libel suit. What many ...


1

Every index fund is an approximation of the underlying index. They'll all have some level of error in tracking the index for a variety of reasons. Among them Funds are likely to have at least a small cash position both to satisfy investors that want to sell and to deal with inflows that aren't yet invested. This is some of what you're talking about. ...


1

Since you have a group number, I assume it's a company plan. Every company assigns someone in your company to be group administrator. That is who you need to speak to first.


1

Under the current rules, yes, benefits are indexed to inflation. However, note that if you have a government pension from work not covered by Social Security, you may face an offset that could reduce the benefits.


1

You can reach out to the company and see if they are interested in buying you out. Depending on local laws (IANAL), to do that, they might have to issue a buyback. Smaller, privately held, companies probably won't do that as they lack the necessary cash. Your next option is to do your own research. Start with the state of Delaware's division of corporations:...


1

I think you're misunderstanding what Singh did. Singh entered orders which he intended (in other words, he planned, or he wanted) to cancel before those orders executed. And he was successful; he did cancel the orders before they executed. But if the orders had executed, he would not have been able to cancel them. You seem to think that Singh canceled ...


1

If you withdraw the money in 2020, then by the time you file your 2020 tax return (March or April 2021 for most of us), you have to be square with the government. Square here would be that the difference between the total tax as calculated on your form and the total money you have given to the government has to be 0. The total money you have given to the ...


1

In addition to the points you raised, you should also consider that most (if not all) Indian mutual funds will not accept investments from an individual living in the US, because of IRS reporting regulations


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