10

Unemployment fraud is a crime. If you believe that what you were doing could be seen as fraud, you may want to contact an attorney to discuss your options. To answer your follow-up question: A 1099 only shows a total compensation for the year; it does not include the dates of the payments.


7

Hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of stolen identities were used to file billions of dollars in unemployment claims. One affected person was my spouse. I just read last week that $36 billion were paid out before the situation was discovered. The social security numbers were presumably gathered in previous phishing attacks and data breaches (especially ...


7

You and your employer face multiple potential problems, some legal legal and some tax issues: You and potentially your employer may be accused of conspiring to commit unemployment fraud. States know how to identify this. People have been trying to do this for years. Even if a 1009 or W-2 don't show dates, the state may ask for additional information. They ...


3

Is there a way for a 1099 to show that I was working during unemployment benefits? The only date on a 1099 is the calendar year. If the IRS audits the company, they might see the company paying you cash, ask about it, and "discover" that you were getting unemployment at the time. Prepare to pay back all that unemployment insurance, plus a ...


2

There is a page summarizing the eligibility of people for EI. You may be entitled to EI regular benefits if you: Were employed in insurable employment lost your job through no fault of your own have been without work and without pay for at least seven consecutive days in the last 52 weeks have worked for the required number of insurable employment hours ...


2

Be prepared to pay the unemployment back. All states are required to assess a penalty of not less than 15% of the amount of the fraudulent payment. Other penalties under state unemployment insurance laws generally include criminal prosecution with fines and/or incarceration; required repayment of fraudulently collected benefits; forfeiting future income tax ...


1

In general in Pennsylvania you have to be unemployed though no fault of your own. Though if your hours are reduced you can get a partial payment. There normally is a waiting week where you have to be unemployed for a week, but COVID legislation has addressed that issue. If you are working full weeks or getting full compensation you are unlikely to get any ...


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