Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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If the account that you put your shared rent payments into was only used for the purpose of paying rent, and you have proof of those transactions, and of the paying of rent, this should be sufficient in the case of an audit.


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You have two separate things going on here, income tax and self-employment tax. Income tax will be paid on your total income, just as if it was all reported on a W2. (But you probably will have to pay something with your return, instead of getting a refund, and may need to make estimated tax payments if you continue with self employment next year.) You ...


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You will pay income tax based on your total income ($70,000 in your example, less deductions). In addition, you will pay self-employment tax on the self-employment income. This is a separate tax, computed on Schedule SE, and added to your other taxes on form 1040. The self-employment tax rate is generally 15.3%. See schedule SE and its instructions for more ...


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So, if I should not fill out income/tax/payments etc. on page 1, where do I enter the amount $1410 that should be refunded? I'm not sure, but one possibility would be that it is not entered anywhere, and the IRS will look at how much you paid before, and calculate a refund based on that. Also, why should I file 8843? International students are "exempt ...


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For 3 years after the filing date, there's no such thing as "your negligence". You are allowed to amend your taxes using Form 1040X for any reason, or no reason at all. So if you see a deduction you missed, by all means! File a 1040X and claim it. After 3 years, you can amend it, but they won't pay you any more refunds. You should write a completely ...


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Assuming you are in the US, based on some things you have said. If you were self-employed, then expensing books related to your business is a no-brainer and would not cause you any problems with the IRS. As an employee, before 2018 you could deduct "unreimbursed employee expenses" as long as they were normal and "necessary" subject to a few restrictions. I ...


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