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2

The IRS probably would not consider the whole day as uninterrupted business use unless you could prove that the entire day was, in fact, spent driving passengers around. If you stopped off somewhere for lunch in between rides, and that was your only non-business stop of the day, you could possibly consider your entire day as uninterrupted business use, so ...


1

Yes, it seems that you can deduct legal expenses that are related to your employment. It should be entered on Line 21 of your return. There are more answers on ttlc.intuit.com/community/tax-credits-deductions/discussion/are-employment-related-legal-fees-still-deductible-in-california/00/174203


3

No. If the IRS believes that your church is being run for your private gain, it'll lose its tax-exempt status. And then you'll be liable for all the back taxes you didn't pay, plus fines and interest. For example, there was a very long-running set of court cases on the tax exempt status of Scientology. If you tried to create a church that acted as a ...


2

As Ben notes, post-2017 it is no longer possible to deduct expenses as an employee (Thanks for that correction!). However, you should consider whether your employer is required to reimburse you for your computer or other expenses. California state law requires businesses to reimburse employees for necessary expenses. As such, if you were not provided a ...


5

As an employee, you are not allowed to deduct any business expenses yourself. You can get reimbursed by your employer for business expenses, and that reimbursement will be tax free for both you and your employer. However, anything your employer chooses not to reimburse is not tax deductible on your return. Unreimbursed employee expenses used to be a tax ...


4

Losses are not part of itemized deductions. You can take the stock losses regardless of whether you itemize.


2

Also how would I prove to the IRS that I'm being truthful for both methods? The key to claiming anything on your tax form is documentation. If you have a receipt you have to keep it. So when you buy gas, or pay for parking or pay a toll you have to have a receipt. When you pay for your auto insurance you have to keep the receipt. For some things like tolls ...


8

As noted in the comments above by Dilip Sarwate - you'll have to depreciate your real estate. More specifically, you can review a couple of IRS publications such as Publication 535 (2019), Business Expenses which goes into some detail about what is considered a deductible expense. The shorter answer is in Deducting Business Expenses where the text explains ...


0

Each employer should specify what they will pay for, or if there is a maximum amount. they will pay. An employer might even give a flat amount no matter what your expenses. Before the 2018 tax changes it was very import to be able to document your expenses, and submit it to the company. If you followed the riles set forth by the company, and they followed ...


0

Legally you can likely claim whatever you want (I would not fake Fattie's advice, though). It depends on what proof (if any) your employer requires. Ethically I would say that one of you should claim the expense, or you each should claim half. It would be ethically wrong for both of you to claim the same expenses, or to claim expenses that were not part of ...


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