4

I understand you're trying to ask a narrow question, but you're basically asking whether you should time the market. You can find tons of books saying you shouldn't try it, and tons more confirming that you can. Both will have data and anecdotes to back them up. So I'll give you my own opinion. Speculation Market timing, especially in a macro sense, is ...


3

You are correct and the ATO is incorrect. Basically the ATO staff are as lazy as they can be. If you have entered the Parental pay leave at Item 1 - Salary or wages, as you correctly have, the ATO staff will not go into the background details of whom the payment is from by checking the ABN (i.e. finding out that the payment comes from Centrelink and not an ...


3

Your super fund should be able to provide the mix of investments and their weightings for the investment option you have chosen. It should be readily available on their website but may be hard to find depending on the fund. If you can't find this information you should call your fund and ask where to find it or for a copy to be sent to you. Here is an ...


3

You can make a start to learn how to make better investing decisions by learning and understanding what your current super funds are invested in. Does the super fund give you choices of where you can invest your funds, and how often does it allow you to change your investment choices each year? If you are interested in one area of investing over others, eg ...


3

For the difference of $8000/year, I would probably find a better use for the money. Where I live, I could buy an annuity that would make up the difference for a little over $100K. With your added numbers, a $650 monthly deposit in your savings account would net you a lump sum of $750K if you assume a 6% rate of return. Even with a 0% rate of return, you're ...


3

When you start accessing an income stream from your super there is a minimum amount you must withdrawal each year depending on your age. Basically the older you get the higher the percentage of your account balance you must withdrawal as a minimum. Under 65 - minimum 4% of account balance 65 - 74 - minimum 5% of account balance 75 - 79 - minimum 6% of ...


3

The long term view you are referring to would be over 30 to 40 years (i.e. your working life). Yes in general you should be going for higher growth options when you are young. As you approach retirement you may change to a more balanced or capital guaranteed option. As the higher growth options will have a larger proportion of funds invested into higher ...


3

It's not compound interest. It is internal rate of return. If you have access to Excel look up the XIRR built-in function.


2

It sounds like you're in a place where you can (almost) set-and-forget your super. As Victor said in the comments, you should choose an industry fund instead of a retail fund, so that fees don't eat up your balance (if you remember the TV ads, one of those funds with the logo looking like two hands covering something valuable!) You could take the option of ...


2

The main risks will depend on where your funds are invested. If you select a more aggressive allocation like shares and property your investment funds will be more susceptible to short term market risks, if however you select a more conservative allocation like fixed interest and bonds you will be exposed to less short term market risk. However, if you want ...


2

Yes you can't simply withdraw your super until you are aged 60 (and that may go up slightly on Budget night 13/05/14). But you can roll it over into a SMSF where you decide where you invest your super funds. However, I would advise against you starting a SMSF at this early age with a very small super fund account. The Admin. and audit fees would eat your ...


2

Here are your options. While you remain an Australian citizen you cannot withdraw super just because you are residing overseas. You could renounce your citizenship - just make sure you have another one to fall back on.


2

One thing you didn't mention is how long ago you moved to BAR. If it was recent, it's feasible that the data just hasn't made it through to the ATO yet. However, having said that, the ATO's general super search is a lost super search. It's meant to show you super that is in your name, but isn't in an account that you control. It's used to claim missing ...


2

The problem with small super account balances is that any annual returns would usually be eaten up by fees, especially if it was a retail fund (which usually have higher fees). That is why the best thing to do is to roll over any small super accounts into your main super account. If you change jobs you can either roll over your previous super account into ...


2

You have to compare the costs of various SMSF providers, which should be able to bundle the compliance audit in their costs. There could still be ambiguity around the cryptocurrency or blockchain asset within an SMSF under Australian regulation (or the lack thereof), and retirement plan consultants will likely be too risk adverse to have a real conversation ...


2

The $25,000 Concessional Cap includes the sum of your employer Super Guaranteed Amounts (currently 9.5%), any Salary Sacrificing Amounts and any Personal Contributions Amounts you make and claim a Tax Deduction for in your Tax Return. If your Concessional Contribution exceeds the $25K Cap, you may have to pay extra tax. In order to make sure you don't go ...


2

Just to clear a few things up first, if you are going to be a self funded retiree you can retire from age 60 and have up to $1.6M in a super pension fund earning you tax free income. If you want to get an Age Pension from the government then you will have to wait until age 67 (however this may rise further by the time you reach that age due to people living ...


2

It you salary sacrifice or claim a deduction on personal contributions, you will pay less tax for every dollar if you are in the 19% tax bracket or a higher tax bracket (as the tax on the contributions is only 15%). So the higher your income, the higher the tax bracket you will be in and the bigger the savings from any addition super contributions you make. ...


2

According to the ATO website: https://www.ato.gov.au/individuals/super/growing-your-super/keeping-track-of-your-super/ato-held-super/ They hold the money for you in a non-investment account for up to 10 years before they claim it as abandonded. It doesn't specify any interest, so it's likely that it doesn't accrue any. The interest rate is set to the ...


1

Note that you cannot contribute more than $25K per year into your super fund as concessional contribution (pre-tax contributions). You can however contribute an additional $100k per year in post-tax contributions (or $300k over a 3 year period - so if you contribute $300k now you cannot contribute any more for another 3 years). Saying that, your ATO link ...


1

The ICR is your annual fees as a percentage of the balance of your capital in the fund. The ICR provides a way for you to compare the fees associated with different retail funds. You can then compare that to what industry fund fees are, as in gerenral industry funds have lower fees than retail funds. An example of an industry fund is Australian Super.


1

Generally you should pay of your debt first, even thought the interest is not that high it is still not deductable, meaning your paying any interest accumulated on the debt with after tax dollars. If you are looking to buy property in Sydney you should wait a bit longer, prices are still on the way down and if Labor gets into Government next year (which is ...


1

Reading through the super rules, it looks to me like you would need to reach retirement age (65) and then you'd have access to your Super even if you're not formally retired in Australia. Here: https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Super/Accessing-your-super/ It says: You can access your super: when you turn 65 (even if you haven’t retired), or ...


1

SMSFs are generally prohibited from acquiring assets from related parties (whether it is purchased by the SMSF or contributed into the fund). There are some exceptions to the above rule for acquiring related party assets, including: • Listed securities (ie shares, units or bonds listed on an approved stock exchange, such as the ASX) acquired at market value....


1

My super fund and I would say many other funds give you one free switch of strategies per year. Some suggest you should change from high growth option to a more balance option once you are say about 10 to 15 years from retirement, and then change to a more capital guaranteed option a few years from retirement. This is a more passive approach and has ...


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