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In the Netherlands for a mortgage they expect that you pay 2% of your debt each month. For student debt (before 2015) it is 0,75% and for newer ones it is 0,45%. You can go to an Mortgage advisor and request and 'introduction meeting'*(These are free). You can ask the question an maybe they can answer them. Some (smaller) mortgage providers don't want '...


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Refinance the private and public loan into two low fixed interest loan. The first golden rules on real investments are never invest using leverage(loan money). By looking at your total debts, any investment is deemed (loan) leveraging, it is similar to borrowing $210K with 8% interest rate ($16,800 interest annually) and try to speculate on investment that ...


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Besides what @tuxtuxtux says... given the potential for a downturn in 401k/IRA accounts This demonstrates a misunderstanding about what Retirement Accounts are (which is "containers"). You can put high-risk, low-risk, medium-risk and any mix you desire (depending of course on what funds the plan administrators support). Thus, put money in 401(k) and ...


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It's hard to stay out of speculative investing, but given the potential for a downturn in 401k/IRA accounts, should I funnel what percentage of my liquid cash should I be investing in my student loans? How about all of it? You're averaging almost 8% in interest now, which is a fantastic risk-free rate of return. I certainly wouldn't funnel any after-tax ...


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Objectively, that is a lot to repay. Congratulations for acknowledging that it needs to be repaid quickly. Confirm that the refinancing is truly no-fee, that there are no origination fees, closing fees, or similar built into the loan. Given 1. is true, you should definitely refinance all the private loans. I would recommend refinancing all the federal ...


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I phoned SLC, they explained they now get regular updates from HMRC (but it sounds like they are not processed when received). The advisor checked and found a more recent update from HMRC which included my missing payments, from this he was able to recalculate my balance and advise me how to proceed from here. So the answer is phone SLC and get them to ...


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This won't work. Note I'm assuming your student loan works like a line of credit (because the question wouldn't make sense otherwise). The deal breakers are: Most lenders will not allow you to make loan payments with a credit card. If they did, it would cost them at least a 2-3% fee per payment and they would very likely pass this fee on to you. Those ...


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Your plan misunderstands how interest is most likely calculated. It will be calculated on the average daily balance over the period (month). So if you start with $10k on the 1st, pay off $3k with your credit card on the 25th and "take out" the $3k to pay back the card (if you can even do that), your average daily balance will be (assuming a 30-day month): ...


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My monthly minimum payment is under $200, and my employer contributes $200 on my loans each month. Is your employer contribution based upon your monthly minimum or will it always be $200 no matter what your monthly minimum is? How long do you plan to stay at your employer? Scenario 1 Employer contribution is always $200: I would just keep the student ...


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Understanding that not everything mentioned might apply to you, here's what I'd do, in this order: Put $1000 in an 2% Savings Account Emergency Fund. Fund your 401(k) up to the Company Match. (Otherwise, you're cutting your pay.) Learn where all your money goes. (Not knowing this is how we slowly drowned in CC debt without buying lots of extravagant stuff....


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Going to the official source, see IRS Publication 970 (2018 tax year link). The point of contention will be the official definition of "obligated". Per Publication 970, it has this to say: Don't Include as Interest You can't claim a student loan interest deduction for any of the following items. Interest you paid on a loan if, under the ...


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