New answers tagged

1

The reporting of financial data in round thousands is applicable only on the tabbed page headed "Financials". The tabbed page headed "Statistics", where you are reading the total shares outstanding, does not report figures in round thousands. Nor does the statistics page say that it is reporting in round thousands. For example, the reported earnings per ...


1

If i’m not mistaken, common stock under the balance sheet under shareholder equity is the cumulative amount of “the value” of the shares issued!! 45,972,000 * 1000 is the total value of shares issued throughout the history The previous quarter was: 45,174,000 * 1000 The difference is $798,000,000. No clue what is is though. I’m assuming its the amount of ...


4

Stock prices are not tied to current performance, they are tied to future performance that may be tied to current (and future) market conditions. So if the market thinks that a company will perform poorly going forward based on the current environment, then it's likely that it's stock price will suffer. The financial (i.e. ignoring voting rights) value of a ...


-1

Consider an individual company. Or, a portfolio of companies. At discount rate of 10%, and growth rate of 4%, one dollar of yearly income is worth 18.3 USD. (If you want the formula, open GNU Octave or Matlab and type sum(1.04.^[0:1000] ./ 1.10.^[0:1000]) into it). Now, if this year, income drops by 20%, instead of getting 1 USD, you get 0.8 USD, the ...


1

Option implied volatility begins rising 2-4 weeks before an earnings announcement, sometimes sharply. It then contracts when after the EA and option premium drops. Some buy the straddle up to several weeks before the EA in order to offset the time decay, hoping that the underlying may also move directionally resulting in straddle profits before the EA. ...


1

Short positions don't change the financial fundamentals or the business prospects of a company. Large short positions can only successfully respond to serious problems. A company with large investments in another company must disclose the investments and often needs government approval. If the approval happens quickly then it's probably just acknowledgement ...


2

Approach 2 is not really possible. Let's say you buy your initial 100 shares (let's say at $100 per share) and then the price goes up 1%. The only way to "take" that 1% profit is to sell 1 off your hundred shares. You now have $101 in cash and 99 shares left. Then the price zig-zags down and back up and you want to "take" that 1% profit again, ...


0

Person B keep his money in the stock but every time it’s up 1% he takes ONLY the 1% profits and leave the rest invested. You cannot take "ONLY the 1% profits and leave the rest invested" because each share has a 1% profit. In order to realize that 1% gain you must sell all 100 shares. Is approach 2 have a name, and is it better or worse than 1 ...


1

2 is called day trading or scalping depending on timeframe. It is better IF YOU CAN PULL IT OFF - which most people are woefully incompetent at. Actually on any trading. It also is not "being invested", it is "trading" - which means you will spend a lot of time doing it, which means you better earn more than you could otherwise earn. It is more a job than ...


7

The stock price you see listed is the price of the last trade executed on the stock exchange. It doesn't mean that you will actually be able to buy or sell the stock at that price. A stock market is a place which brings buyers and sellers together. People place buy offer "I want to buy X of this stock for at most $Y" and sell offers "I want to sell X of ...


3

The market is an auction. Volume moves price If the current price is $50.00 by $50.05 with a size of 40x50, it will take the purchase of 5,000 shares to take out all of the shares offered at the ask price of $50.05. Those 5,000 buy side shares could be 50 people buying 100 shares each or one person buying 5,000 shares. The number of buyers is irrelevant. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included