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255

This is clearly not the answer you’re looking for, but you went wrong by trying to pick stocks and time the market. It’s been shown to be a fool’s game. Furthermore: if you picked several stocks, and think you did something wrong because one of them went down, then you have some rough days ahead of you. There will be long stretches where most or all of ...


142

It's important to remember what a share is. It's a tiny portion of ownership of a company. Let's pretend we're talking about shares in a manufacturing company. The company has one million shares on its register. You own one thousand of them. That means that you own 1/1000th of the company. These shares are valued by the market at $10 per share. The ...


115

Stephen's answer is the 100% correct one made with the common Economics assumption, that people are rational. A company that never has paid dividends, is still worth something to people because of its potential to start paying dividends later and it is often better to grow now and payoff later. However, the actual answer is much more disapointing, because ...


98

You bought the stock at some point in the past. You must have had a reason for this purchase. Has the recent change in price changed the reason you bought the stock? You must assume your losses are sunk costs. No matter what action you take, you can not recover your losses. Do not attempt to hold the stock in the hopes of regaining value, or sell it to stop ...


88

Refresh the report. You'll probably see that dip gone. It was likely just a glitch in the reporting data when you happened to run it. Oddities like this happen from time to time. When you see something extreme like this, it's best to check multiple sources and re-run the reports again a bit later.


79

The first thing that pops up when you open your link is a disclaimer: 66% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work, and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money. 66% isn't a very reassuring number for blindly following anonymous strangers ...


63

It's tech-heavy because I am a tech guy and I always feel comfortable investing in a tech company. First, no you do not feel comfortable. You invested in an incredibly volatile company in a volatile industry and you're complaining about it on the internet to strangers in just a couple of months after investing when you've hit a relatively small decline. Re-...


63

Well, consider it from the other side. Why would a trader be willing to share trades? Consider the following scenario. The reference trader makes a trade in a low volume market. The trade is published so that everyone can see it. Multiple people copy the trade as best they can, but ... The price moves due to the uncommon level of demand. The ...


53

To expand on the comment made by @NateEldredge, you're looking to take a short position. A short position essentially functions as follows: Borrow a share owned by someone else Sell that share Wait for the price to fall Buy a share after the price falls Return the share to the owner from which you borrowed. Here's the rub: you have unlimited loss ...


47

I am voting you up because this is a legitimate question with a correct possible answer. Yes, you shouldn't buy penny stocks, yes you shouldn't speculate, yes people will be jealous that you have money to burn. Your question: how to maximize expected return. There are several definitions of return and the correct one will determine the correct answer. ...


41

Many news outlets ... are reporting that the current US stock sell-off is due to a stronger-than-expected jobs report in January... Had the market done well in the last few days those same people would have claimed it was due to the stronger than expected jobs report, and in fact oftentimes a strong jobs report does lead to a bump in the market. Furhtermore,...


38

It's got to be a bad chunk of data on Google. Yahoo finance does not show that anomaly for 1988, nor does the chart from Home Depot's investor relations site:


37

It's very simple. The low cost index funds are generally the best investments for investors, but - because of the low fees and the fact that the offerings of different companies are nearly identical - they are the worst for the investment houses. Therefore, the investment houses spend a lot of money convincing investors to choose other funds. If you ...


29

It seems to me that your main question here is about why a stock is worth anything at all, why it has any intrinsic value, and that the only way you could imagine a stock having value is if it pays a dividend, as though that's what you're buying in that case. Others have answered why a company may or may not pay a dividend, but I think glossed over the ...


29

It is not unusual for the acquiring company's stock to fall in any time of merger announcement. Some of it has to do with the fact the acquirer is going to either take on new debt to pay for the cost of the acquisition or they will need to issue new shares. Either is dilutive to shareholder value, so this is "baked into" the process. In the instant case, ...


28

tl;dr: The CNN Money and Yahoo Finance charts are wildly inaccurate. The TD Ameritrade chart appears to be accurate and shows returns with reinvested dividends. Ignoring buggy data, CNN most likely shows reinvested dividends for quoted securities but not for the S&P 500 index. Yahoo most likely shows all returns without reinvested dividends. Thanks to a ...


25

You are misunderstanding what makes the price of a stock go up and down. Every time you sell a share of a stock, there is someone else that buys the stock. So it is not accurate to say that stock prices go down when large amounts of the stock are sold, and up when large amounts of the stock are bought. Every day, the amount of shares of a stock that are ...


24

You are interpreting things wrong. Indian Infotech and Software Ltd (BOM:509051) clearly has volume and trades. The MoneyControl site says VOLUME 2,467,182 AVERAGE VOLUME 5-Day 3,387,212 10-Day 1,826,464 30-Day 1,178,923 Your words like "Nobody is selling the stock" and "no trade going on" are completely unfounded.


24

Check your price to earnings ratios and your price to book ratios for each of your assets. It has been an upward ride, so "foolish" stocks like Alphabet tend to rise faster. I would begin to consider purchasing, if it were me, at $225 per share. Whether I would pay that much would depend on a deep investigation of the firm's financials. I could see an ...


22

Instead of giving part of their profits back as dividends, management puts it back into the company so the company can grow and produce higher profits. When these companies do well, there is high demand for them as in the long term higher profits equates to a higher share price. So if a company invests in itself to grow its profits higher and higher, one of ...


20

Hope springs eternal in the human breast. No actively managed fund has beaten the indices over a long period of time, but over shorter periods, actively managed funds have beaten the indices quite often, sometimes quite spectacularly, and sometimes even for many years in a row. Examples from the past include Fidelity Magellan and Legg Mason Value Trust. So ...


20

I would recommend reading Intelligent Investor first. It was written slightly more recently (1949) than Security Analysis (1934). More important is that a recently revised edition* of Intelligent Investor was published. The preface and appendix were written by Warren Buffett. Intelligent Investor is more practical as an introduction for a novice. You may ...


20

You should spend zero on your stock research company. If the management of the company actually had persistent skill in picking stocks, they would not be peddling their knowledge to the retail market for a few hundred dollars. They would rake in millions and billions by running a huge hedge fund and buy themselves a private island or something. ...


20

This is an excellent question, one that I've pondered before as well. Here's how I've reconciled it in my mind. Why should we agree that a stock is worth anything? After all, if I purchase a share of said company, I own some small percentage of all of its assets, like land, capital equipment, accounts receivable, cash and securities holdings, etc., as ...


20

If there was an easy answer to your question, everybody would be millionaires. I suggest reading "One Up on Wall Street" by Peter Lynch. After you are done with that, read "Security Analysis" by Graham and Dodd. Professor Graham was Warren Buffet's mentor. The nature of many equities (like Google) is that their pricing far exceeds any possible value the ...


19

For example, on Jan 29th 2016 the price was reported as £178.21 when viewing over a 3M range, and £12,425.10 when viewing over a 5D range. The confusion is primarily arising because UK equities and stocks are quoted in pence and not pounds. 12,425.10 is in pence so it is £124.2510 And NAV is quoted in USD, so if you convert it back to GBP, you will ...


18

EDIT: It was System Disruption or Malfunctions August 24, 2015 2:12 PM EDT Pursuant to Rule 11890(b) NASDAQ, on its own motion, in conjunction with BATS, and FINRA has determined to cancel all trades in security Blackrock Capital Investment. (Nasdaq: BKCC) at or below $5.86 that were executed in NASDAQ between 09:38:00 and 09:46:00 ET. This ...


18

It sounds like the asker is looking for a rule of thumb about P/E. If only the market would be so kind as to have a simple rule of thumb. It unfortunately depends on the time and the range you are looking at. For instance, looking at US Equities, from 2012-present, and looking at each PE value (i.e. thepe=2 finds all stocks with P/E between 2 and 3), we ...


17

If you want to put in $1000 into penny stocks, I wouldn't be calling that investing but more like speculation or gambling. You might have better odds at a casino. If you don't have much money at the moment to invest properly and you are just starting out as an investor, I would spend that $1000 on educating yourself so that by the time you have more money ...


17

First: do you understand why it dropped? Was it overvalued before, or is this an overreaction to some piece of news about them, or about their industry, or...? Arguably, if you can't answer that, you aren't paying enough attention to have been betting on that individual stock. Assuming you do understand why this price swing occurred -- or if you're ...


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