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When you file your PA state taxes, you will get the appropriate refund. When they take withholding out of your paycheck, that is not tax. That is Your Money, and this is a great example of that. And the idea is that the withholding is to force you to put money into a "savings account" to pay your taxes. Even though it's your money, it's held in ...


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There are two parts: Future pay is handled by submitting a new state W-4. Past pay: you will have to file a non-resident form with Pennsylvania to get a refund. You will also have to file a tax return with Mississippi to pay them what they owe. The tax tables may differ so your refund is not likely to equal the amount you owe. This is an example of why ...


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Let me say first that I have no experience doing California taxes. However, I think I can make sense of the Schedule CA (540) instructions for you. First, it is important to understand how the instructions for Part I are organized. The Part I instructions are split into two groups: There is a relatively short section devoted to "Column A," and a ...


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Actually, it sounds like NY is one of the states that plays nice. Imagine that you had a warehouse in a state and no income was earned in that state. Also, imagine that all your sales were in an adjacent state. Imagine the state you sold in had no income tax. Is none of your income taxable in the state with storage? If the storage didn't exist, then sales ...


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Neither IRS's definition of residency1 nor Indiana's definition of residency for in-state tuition purpose should directly determine your residency for Indiana income tax purpose. 45 Ind. Admin. Code 3.1-1-21 defines residency for Indiana tax purpose: "Resident" Defined. An Indiana resident is: (a) Any individual who was domiciled in Indiana during ...


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