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2

My first thought is, "so what?" You want to be in a cap weighted index of roughly the largest 500 companies in the US public markets, you got it. So companies are entering and falling out of the index a bit more frequently, so what? But then you have to question some data. Taking a brief skim of your link you get bullet point 1: The 33-year average ...


3

Well it's certainly nothing new. If you look at the chart on that page, longevity is actually higher now that it was in all of the 2000s. They are just predicting that turnover will increase over the next 10 years, though I haven't read the paper in detail to understand why they predict that. I would also posit that turnover is a result of market ...


-5

Short answer: S&P 500 Index ETF returns will not be affected in the long run. Here are the reasons: S&P 500 index is balanced and spread across different industries, thus it is impossible for all the industries to perform badly the same time. There are 500 companies inside the index, that means individual company stock only weight 1/500 or 0.2% ...


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