87

In my experience when a salesperson says a particular deal is only good if you purchase right now, 100% of the time it is not true. Of course I can't guarantee that is universally the case, but if you leave and come back 5 minutes later, or tomorrow, or next week, it's extremely likely that they'll still take your money for the original price. (In fact, ...


60

There are few main reasons I can think of that the salesperson would do this: Time kills all deals is a cliche in sales. Once you leave the sale is much less likely. The owner is cash poor at the moment. Each of your dollars is worth more now than it will be tomorrow. For example, let's say they have a 10% 15, Net 30 financing deal with their supplier. ...


57

Two options you can try: Go to the store and ask them to refund the difference. They might not, but it doesn't hurt to ask. Often stores will do this if you are within the return window because it saves them some hassle over you returning the used item and then buying a new item at the lower price. Buy the identical item again at the new price, then ...


24

Depending on how you paid for the item, some credit cards have price protection insurance. There are always minimums (e.g. Must be more than 10% or €150 whichever is greater) and paperwork, and processing time, but it does not involve the retailer agreeing to your request.


19

Ultimately this is just bad luck. Prices change, especially for things like computers which become obsolete in a short time. At the end of the day a cutting edge PC is only cutting edge for about 6 months and will be old hat in 2 years, so there is bound to be some point where the price drops. After all, putting things on sale at the end of a season is ...


16

This is way too long for a comment, so I am posting this as an answer. My bet is that you're buying a new piano. It is the only instrument that makes sense. The rest of this answer are going to assume this, but this should apply well if you're going after a violin or marimba for example. For those readers that do not know, a piano is a very delicate and ...


15

Using your credit card: May earn points for your credit card rewards program Major credit cards usually have lower APR's than store credit cards, so smaller interest charges if it takes you a while to pay Convenience of all expenses appearing on one bill, easier to pay down Applying for a store credit card: May get one-time discount, or several months of ...


15

The US doesn't have a Value Added Tax, which is the one usually refundable upon departing the country... so sales taxes you pay in this country stay in this country and you don't get a refund. Just remember to treat the tax as an implied part of the price. (And be aware that state and local taxes may vary, so the total price may be higher in one place than ...


12

Unless you bought the phone in a duty free shop, probably not, and even then you may have to pay duties when you return. TripAdvisor sums this up nicely: Sales taxes are imposed on merchandise that you take with you from the shop. Unlike VAT schemes, there is no "export" price or system for a refund of the tax if you take the merchandise with you ...


12

Since you have a credit card, I recommend you use it for the purchase. It gets you two things at the very least: Gets the purchases reported as credit utilization. If you handle that correctly, you can improve your score Most card vendors give free extended warranty and return policies that a retailer or manufacturer does not without extra fees. I buy all ...


11

There are a couple of advantages that I can think of. Since the machines are less complicated because they don't have to handle cash, they are less expensive and require less maintenance. Machines that handle cash require lots of moving parts. Cash machines require lots of employee interaction. The machines need to be stocked with cash each day, and at ...


10

I often spend weeks or months (and sometimes even years) deciding whether to buy something. Certainly the dealer should recognize you by now if you take a third opportunity to look at the same instrument. You could politely remind him that you've twice declined his excellent prices. From there you can assert that you will purchase only when you are ready.


9

Amazon will not credit any different card. They cannot know that the different card number is in fact a replacement for the old one you used. Your card issuer, however, can. If receive the refund form Amazon, and can transfer it to the new card. However, you need to talk to them and ask them if and how will they do that. They may decide to apply it to the ...


8

To clarify: you're asking whether a store can refuse your 200 EUR for arbitrary reasons (i.e. not the reason that they would have to give you a large amount of change)? If so, then yes, this is legal pretty much anywhere. The EUR notes are legal tender in the Euro countries, but this only means that they must be accepted to settle debt. And a normal store ...


8

This seems like it should be an easy fix. If the license doesn't match due to a typing error, then presumably most of the information would be correct, or close to correct, so viewing what they have side by side with your info should nearly line up. If not, then maybe the typo was in the credit ID- meaning that your information got assigned to a different ...


7

Tax Refund: The US generally does not refund tax like other countries. For larger sales, you might want to try state tax refunds, check here: https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/373/~/how-to-obtain-a-refund-of-sales-tax-paid-while-visiting-the-united-states US Customs: You never pay US customs when you leave, they don't care about what you take out ...


6

Generally a "cash back" option at the time a purchase is made is only available to purchasers using a DEBIT card. Debit cards usually have no rewards. Assuming you are able to have a retailer charge you $100 for a $5 purchase you should earn rewards on the total charged to the card, i.e. $100.


5

I have a very simple rule. For anything other than trivial purchases (a small fraction of my monthly income), the only final decision I will make in the presence of a salesperson is "No". After I have the terms nailed down, and still feel that I am likely to buy the item, I leave the store, car dealership etc., and think about it by myself. Often, I go to a ...


5

I think you’ve already figured out the answer. The person wants the shoes, but realizes that they don’t now have the money to spend on shoes, and buying now was a mistake. So they return the shoes, get their money back, but put the shoes on layaway so they can pay for the shoes in installments. Of course, layaway plans usually involve a service fee, so ...


4

mhoran_psprep is spot on. By doing a strict debit/credit analysis, this seems like a golden opportunity. Spend ~$133 for $245 in gift cards. Presumably you could sell those gift cards at a 20% discount, or use them on the next trip. You received $1760 worth of merchandise for a positive income. Some of that merchandise could be sold. Sealed health ...


4

It can be done, but it takes a very special set of circumstances: You must be willing to buy only items that you can get for free or nearly free. You must be willing to buy as many items as the store will allow you to in a single visit The store must offer programs like double or triple manufacturers coupons. You must be willing to do everything you can to ...


4

In the US, you must rely on seller policies and manufacturer guarantees [citation needed]. In Europe, you additionally have certain buyer's rights which are very significant and virtually always preferred over the former. Since this is in Europe, let us first make a distinction between buying offline at a physical store, and remotely (e.g. online or via ...


4

They may stock items that frame the various price points. Of course they risk having the items go stale before they are sold. You also have situations where the store will advertise an item, but end up taking a loss on that sale because it will bring people in, and they will make other purchases. Determining what to stock, how to display it, and how to ...


4

My advice is to quit worrying about the salesman's tactics. They are a distraction. What do you want? How much are you willing to pay for it. If you want the instrument, decide how much you want to pay for it. Round down to the next even hundred. Take that much in $100 bills. Put the money in his hand and say, "This is what I have, take it or leave it"...


4

deductible (lower is better) Not always true. A low deductible costs more. So if the number of claims over the lifetime is small, then that low deductible can be costly. On to to your question: Customer service is a big issue. How has the current company treated you. Have there been any issues with billing, the website, or processing any claims. Many ...


3

No you don't have to be a member to use a gift card: http://lifehacker.com/the-best-things-you-can-do-at-costco-without-a-membersh-1591680306


3

The networks distinguish between the "purchase" component of a transaction and the cash back component. Issuers won't count the cash back amount toward rewards. Merchants also don't pay regular interchange on the cash back amount.


3

Call Amazon customer service and ask for a price reduction. As long as you are within the return period for your device, they will usually honor the request. It would be simple enough for you to return the device and go to the competition. As a relevant personal anecdote, I bought my girlfriend a Kindle Fire last year and the price dropped a week later. ...


3

Yes, you get a refund but only in a couple of states. If you are visiting Louisiana (e.g. New Orleans), there is sales tax refund on tangible items purchased at tax-free stores and permanently removed from the United States (http://www.louisianataxfree.com) . Clothes, shoes, makeup.. these are all items you can claim a tax refund for. Alas, I believe only ...


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