Hot answers tagged

98

It looks like "shipment scam" mixed with "bait and switch". There are few ways you can get robbed: So the "DHL" (not really) will say they have cash for you but they need to be paid for handling (or something like that). you pay the guy his fee, get cash and realize they're fake. You lost fee and stuff the "DHL" will contact you and tell you that you need ...


93

An uncle of mine fell for a variant of that scam last April. This is what happened in his case: He had a 2nd hand Apple laptop for sale for 250 Euro and advertised it on Marktplaats (the Dutch equivalent to Craigslist). Was promised a DHL swap. Envelope with the cash in exchange for the laptop. (He wasn't aware DHL doesn't do that sort of thing.) A ...


69

You're selling the shares to someone else (in exchange for cash), not exchanging the shares for company cash. Thus, the only way this could harm the company is by selling to someone who wants to take over the company (fine as far as it goes) but would poorly run the company.


64

Private companies don't have liquid secondary markets. There are no identified buyers of your shares. The next time there's a fund raising round at the company they will include some or all of your shares in the transaction at whatever valuation is being used for the transaction. What you need to calculate the value of the shares is a buyer for your ...


47

A "seller concession" is a good solution for a buyer with no cash who wants things done on the house. You keep the sale price the same, and give them cash back at closing, which they use for the repairs. This solves the buyer's problem of having no cash and needing a way to fund the repairs, and it reduces risk for you, the seller, since you're not paying ...


41

It depends on how the shares are sold. Let's say the share price right now is $10, exactly. Shares sold for $10.01 do not sell and shares sold at $9.99 are a loss to the seller. Chances are you won't be able to sell all shares at $10/share because there won't be that many buyers looking to purchase that many shares. So you decide to sell these shares at $9....


33

Does it make sense for me to keep the house Are you willing to be a landlord for $91 a month? What happens if your house goes unrented for 3 months? 6 months? How will you pay its mortgage? In my opinion, you don't have enough buffer to make this worth the risk. If you could afford for it to go unrented for 6 months then it might be a good investment in ...


23

You have no guarantees. The stock may last have traded at $100 (so, the market price is $100), but is currently in free-fall and nobody else will be willing to buy it for any more than $80. Or heck, maybe nobody will be willing to buy it at all, at any price. Or maybe trading on this stock will be halted. Remember, the market price is just what the stock ...


21

I am motivated to sell, should I agree to replace AC? There's no simple answer, home sale negotiation has a lot of variables. Here are some things I consider when deciding what I will/won't do to sell a house after receiving inspection objections: Time on market - If I blow up a deal, how long will I likely be waiting for another offer and how much will ...


19

Is my calculation correct? More or less. Your list of expenses is not complete and repair/maintenance expenses can vary wildly. You'll also depreciate the house (not the land), so with your current numbers you could be running a loss for tax purposes which can offset income tax on other income and basically act as a discount to your cost of equity, so ...


17

Before I answer, you should know a few things about me. I've paid to get into a couple of Network-Marketing/Multi-Level-Marketing (MLM) franchises, and I made a little money in it. I have worked in financial services sales. I later went on to get my Masters in Business Administration (MBA). I've been there, and I know MLMs and Business in theory and ...


13

You paid $352 for a $1000 bond, i.e.: you got $648 discount. So when the maturity occurs, you will get the $264 coupon payments and the $648 redemption value on top of what you actually paid - total $912. If your capital gain exceeds that $912 - definitely sell, ASAP. Obviously there's a risk that they will default, which judging by the discount you got ...


13

The term "unsettled funds" is a legal term, defined by legislation and judicial decisions and enforced/monitored by the SEC. The intuition is the idea that while a financial transaction on a security may be processed at one point in time, the "settlement" of the cash takes time and could end up reversed or delayed (such as for rule violations, investigation, ...


13

OP asks, if selling 3% share of a company would "harm the company." If this is a private stock buyback by OP's company, the company is spending cash to buy OP's shares. Simultaneously, the company is increasing its own shares by an equal amount. So the company balance sheet is not harmed. Consider, however, the impact on the company's cash position. ...


12

Most participants will win nothing, so your expected winnings are almost zero. You could donate the equipment to a local high school or college. It would wipe out all the income, and you would end up getting nothing, but you would owe no taxes. It would be easy to do, and you would end up with a nice thank you letter from the school, and maybe your name on ...


12

You could have the buyer go to the bank with you so that he can get evidence that the loan will be paid in full and that the lien will be lifted. The bank won't sign over the title (and lift the lien) until the loan is paid back in full. DMV.org has a pretty good section about this. (Note: not affiliated with the actual DMV) Selling to a Private Party ...


12

Another thing to be careful about is a scam where the scammer pretends to deliver a genuine shipment from the company, sent by someone as a surprise (flowers, box of chocolates... money?), but on the door, they first hand you the delivery in a friendly manner and then they say that the postage is not paid for it and ask for say EUR 1-2. The idea is that the ...


11

There are several factors that can help you make a decision. How friendly are the laws to tenants as opposed to landlords? How easy will it be for you to collect rent? How much management is needed? Do you desire to own rental properties? What does your schedule look like? Based upon pure numbers I would keep this property. It looks like you can earn ...


11

In order to see whether you can buy or sell some given quantity of a stock at the current bid price, you need a counterparty (a buyer) who is willing to buy the number of stocks you are wishing to offload. To see whether such a counterparty exists, you can look at the stock's order book, or level two feed. The order book for liquid stocks. The order book ...


11

All of the other answers concentrate on the impact on the share price or company value of selling some small fraction of the company's shares. Depending on exactly how the shares are sold, and how large the market for the shares is this can vary from "none" to "non-trivial". However the answers have all neglected the possible impact of the sale on investor ...


10

Four years into the mortgage, here is a table showing how much principal you would be able to pay off assuming a 30-year amortization with a fixed interest rate and a monthly payment. Rate Paid Off 3% 6992 4% 5989 5% 5096 6% 4308 The amount of interest that is paid each month can be easily calculated by ...


10

I don't have a formula for anything like this, but it is important to note that the "current value" of any asset is really theoretical until you actually sell it. For example, let's consider a house. You can get an appraisal done on your house, where your home is inspected, and the sales of similar houses in your area are compared. However, this value is ...


10

No one can answer this but yourself.... 1) Have you considered closing cost (you'll pay the closing cost for at least 1 property if you sell yours and buy another. 2) Assuming you didn't spend a bunch of money on renovations it would seem that your profit comes mostly from the average home price rising. As such a 3 Bedroom house will also be far more ...


9

This is actually a very complicated question. The key reading in this area is a seminal paper by Almgren & Chriss, "Optimal Execution of Portfolio Transactions" (2000). They show that there's a tradeoff between liquidating your portfolio faster and knowing the value with more certainty, versus liquidating more slowly (and likely for a higher price) but ...


8

I'm guessing PA means the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In the US, it may so be that your classic automobile is considered a collectible. Long term gain on sale of collectibles is taxed at the maximum 28% rate (see here for the IRS tax topic on this). This is regardless of your AGI. The 0% long term capital gain rate doesn't apply to collectibles. The ...


8

I don't know what country you live in or what the laws and practical circumstances of owning rental property there are. But I own a rental property in the U.S., and I can tell you that there are a lot of headaches that go with it. One: Maintenance. You say you have to pay an annual fee of 2,400 for "building maintenance". Does that cover all maintenance to ...


7

You need to get the current tax software, the 2013 filing software is out already, even though it needs to update itself before filing, as the final forms aren't ready yet. Then you will look carefully at Schedule E to understand what gets written off. I see you are looking at the $2200 rent vs your own rent of $2100, but of course, the tax form doesn't ...


7

There are lots of answers here, but I'll add my two cents... The best way to win is not to play. MLM is not a viable business model. Don't go in thinking you'll beat the system by trying harder than everyone else. The only way you'll make any money is by recruiting lots of people, and selling products that can be obtained for cheaper elsewhere at a normal ...


7

In the US, real-estate agents in many markets join a multiple listing service -- all members of the service list all the properties of the agents in the group on their own web sites, advertisements, etc., and try and sell them/bring them to the attention of their own buyers. These people usually charge 6% of the selling price as their commission, which is ...


7

The psychology of investing is fascinating. I buy a stock that's out of favor at $10, and sell half at a 400% profit, $50/share. Then another half at $100, figuring you don't ever lose taking a profit. Now my Apple shares are over $500, but I only have 100. The $10 purchase was risky as Apple pre-iPod wasn't a company that was guaranteed to survive. The ...


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