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I find your math very confusing, and you ignore any repairs and risks to your houses. Also, if you have 1 000 000 to start with, you can simply invest it, and draw about 5000 $ a month. If you find the stock market to unnerving, you can buy an annuity which will pay you (risk-free) 4200 $ per month for the rest of your life; or you can mix the two ...


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Without the exact numbers, nobody can tell. Depending on their age difference, it can be advantageous to draw two independant payment, or tag one onto the other (take 'half of spouse'), or delay one and/or the other spouse's benefits. Without all the exact numbers, it is impossible to say which option is optimal. You can download a little program from the ...


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From The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) they have a document which may address your question: Private Pensions: OECD Classification and Glossary and from that document there is a nice chart: which presents a way of classifying all of the different private pension plans/retirement income plans. For example in the United States ...


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Retirement benefits (social security) Only taxable Social Security benefits are used in the parental income calculation. The untaxed portion is ignored. The amount that is taxable depends on if you are an individual or married, and what your total income is. Dividends from a Roth IRA Assuming that you mean investment dividends that are not withdrawn ...


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There are a lot of articles out there with of course, differing opinions. A common theme of many (HERE'S ONE) is that because Social Security grows at something near 8% a year from 62 to 70 (plus an occasional COLA bump) then you're better off withdrawing money from your IRA. By doing so, you'll get a much larger check from SS when you claim benefits. ...


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Depending on their life's income history, and their life expectancy, there is a large number of different possibilities which combination would be optimal. There is unfortunately no easy way to find the best option; that's why many companies have complex software that can calculate it for you (basically by brute-forcing through all options). A good plan to ...


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There are active-managed high-yield-bond ETF's paying 2.3% to 2.7% at durations of four to six months. The point is that it's not likely for a bond to get into very much trouble when its only six months from redemption. But the ETF share price will float around a little. And short-term high-yield-bond ETF's can be found at durations of about twenty months ...


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CDs and money market funds are secure investments that preserve principal. If you want a better yield, you have to take on some risk. You stated that you don't trust the stock market at your age and probably won't live long enough to recover losses from a down-turn. If that's truly the case, you can stop reading this answer now. Investment grade ...


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I would be extremely skeptical of anyone pitching a no-risk return in excess of current CD/Money Market rates. Many people in retirement are okay with some risk, and will go with something like 80% bonds 20% stocks for their investment accounts while also having other holdings like a paid off house and cash in savings/CD's/Money Market accounts. The ...


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I thought I'd use this forum to reach out to see if anyone knows of a secure investment that always returns more than 1 or 2%. You most probably won't have such an investment. Some people have belief in real estate. Unfortunately, most real estate investments are not well diversified. A single serious water damage + mold problem and you see the value of ...


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