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One of the great things about these calculators you can play with the values and see the changes in the outcome. So to answer your own question what are the value changes when one does monthly, or daily? There will be a large-ish difference between monthly and yearly but the difference in the amount will diminish as the compounding period shortens. The ...


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the plan is to invest the money in an index fund that on average earns 5% and all dividends are reinvested. I believe 5% is very reasonable on S&P 500. Yes, 5% is a conservative estimate for the S&P 500. What value should I choose for Interest is compounded? Should it be Yearly? For the kind of rough hypothetical that is this exercise, Yearly ...


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Ben Miller addressed the Fool's claim nicely in the link. I'd add that there are specific circumstances where a surviving spouse has several options that can maximize survivor benefits. These can amount to $10k to $25k more, depending on the age of the survivor as well as the deceased. The short answer is that it may be a better decision to accept ...


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Based on the review in this video, it's not a "fraud", just clickbait to get you to sign up to their newsletters. The gist of the argument is that the longer you wait to start drawing Social Security, the more your benefits are. The difference seems to be more than just time value of money, though. It's a significant increase to delay benefit payments (...


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Per year that is $7,200 on a $30,000 investment, which is 24%. That's not the way to calculate the yield. If I spend $1 on a lottery ticket which wins me $100, then I deposit the $100 in a bank account which earns $5 per year, then that bank account is earning me 5%, not 500%. Let's look at the numbers again: This friend is buying property in Lincoln ...


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I can jump in on this as a family with a lot of property. First off, I personally wouldn't mortgage an investment like this. He got lucky with this duplex but it can still go south. Over the years, we have seen a wealth of horrors like you wouldn't dream of from tenants who have destroyed our properties over and over again. Everything from dead sea snakes, ...


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So the general rule for real estate investment (in North America) is this: only do it if you love the idea of doing it. If you love the idea of being a landlord and property manager, you think the Monopoly Guy had the right idea, and you think hours spent repairing units and analyzing property spreadsheets and browsing property listings are a really fun ...


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If you are a US citizen, Medicare will pay for services within the US and its territories. So there should be no problem unless you need emergency care in Mexico because: Some of the Medigap plans offer travel emergency coverage (80%) but usually only for the first 60 days of a trip. Some pay nothing. Some Medicare Advantage plans provide coverage ...


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The biggest problem your friend has isn't the risks associated with real estate per se, and the existing answers have covered those pretty well. The problem is that your friend is about to sink their entire net worth (or some appreciable fraction thereof) into a single asset class. Not a great plan. The problem is systemic risk: for example in this case ...


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Where is the risk? The short answer is... Property damage from weather, termites, tenants, whatever. How about tenants who stop paying the rent and you need to go through legal channels to evict them? It doesn't cost a fortune but you had better not need that rent to make the mortgage. How about another GFC (Global Financial Crisis) like 2008 when ...


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where is the risk? Losing renters Damage done by renters Unexpected maintenance Legal liability Capital losses Other factors that should be included in expenses: Routine maintenance Paying the landlord (essentially a part time job for him) I'm not saying it's a bad investment - and it sounds like he has a decent property for an amazingly cheap price, ...


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